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View Poll Results: Which is your favorite: Rocky or Appalachian mountains
Rocky 210 56.45%
Appalachian 162 43.55%
Voters: 372. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-21-2019, 10:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post

Completely agree. Tennessee tends to get more publicity on its mountains, largely due to Great Smoky Mountains National Park, but NC peaks are higher and IMO, much more beautiful overall than Tennessee.

Another thing about Tennessee is that there is relatively little available land to build on above 3000' or so. I don't know how many posts I've seen over the years on the TN boards for people looking at a higher elevation retreat, but most of the land in TN where you get relief from summer heat and humidity is either national park/forest or state park, or otherwise not able to be developed. There is much more usable land at higher elevation on the NC side.

That's not even mentioning the crowds associated with GSMNP and the whole Gatlinburg mess during prime season. I live in Johnson City. I'm within a couple miles of the Cherokee National Forest. The Pisgah and Jefferson National Forests are within an hour. There are a lot of outdoor options here that are virtually unused compared to the congestion around the national park.

TN winters are wet, mild, and cloudy. It has rained virtually nonstop since Monday. We are now heading into our eighth weekend of the year. Only two have had at least one sunny day in my location. We've basically been stuck in this pattern all winter.

If winter sun is at all important to you, you need to go somewhere other than Tennessee.
I'm currently in the mountains of North Georgia. Right down the street from me, is the state line of North Carolina. I did live in the mountains of North Carolina for a while also, and intend to move there again, but to a higher altitude. I'm looking at a couple of towns at 3,500 to 4,100 altitude, which will give me summer temperatures mostly in the 70s! And those towns are in the only temperate rain forest in the east.

We've had rain all this week, but it's part of the storm that's over the eastern U.S. The northern states are getting snow and we are getting rain. Usually, when we get rain in the winter, it isn't thunderstorms, but these rains have been full of thunderstorms!

Normally, the only word I'd use to describe our winters is "VARIABLE" . . . we have cloudy AND sunny days . . . we have bitter cold AND days with spring temperatures. There are years of frost, but no snow, like this year, and years with two or three snow events - most melting in a day or two, but sometimes snowing deeper and lasting longer. It's constantly changing. At least there are enough sunny days that I don't go crazy.

I think you do get rainier winters though in the Tennessee mountains.
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:33 AM
 
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The Rocky Mountains are more majestic, but not as accessible. I prefer the Appalachian Mountains.
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Old 02-21-2019, 12:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post

The Rocky Mountains are more majestic, but not as accessible. I prefer the Appalachian Mountains.
For me . . .

The Rocky Mountains have awe-inspiring beauty.

The Appalachian Mountains have pull-on-the-heartstrings beauty.
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Old 02-21-2019, 12:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post



TN winters are wet, mild, and cloudy. It has rained virtually nonstop since Monday. We are now heading into our eighth weekend of the year. Only two have had at least one sunny day in my location. We've basically been stuck in this pattern all winter.

If winter sun is at all important to you, you need to go somewhere other than Tennessee.
Can't argue with stats, though. Winters in East Tennessee are still sunnier than those of the Pacific Northwest, i.e. Boise, Spokane, Seattle, Vancouver, and Portland. Go look up their winter average sunshine. Absolutely abysmal and even worse than Chattanooga or Knoxville.
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Old 02-21-2019, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado
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Yep, the Pacific Northwest has very crappy Winters and Springs. Spring is usually even cloudier than Winter time and much rainier.. It is also the time we get those dreadful wind storms that knock power out sometimes for days and blow trees into people's houses or cars. However, there is more sunshine east of the Cascades and less rain.. Although, I would still say it is pretty overcast (although not as rainy, but more snowy) East of the Cascades.


Wow, from what people are saying here it sounds like Tennessee's winters are identical to that of Seattle and Portland. Although, I would say Seattle and Portland averages 38 to 45 in winter months and Tennessee is probably a little warmer on average. Unfortunate, but at least you don't have 7 to 8 months of overcast like in the Northwest.
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Old 02-21-2019, 04:27 PM
 
1,150 posts, read 352,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RotseCherut View Post


Wow, from what people are saying here it sounds like Tennessee's winters are identical to that of Seattle and Portland.
In terms of temps and snow, probably, but in terms of cloudiness and gloom winter gloom, Seattle and even Spokane and Boise are definitely drearier than Tennessee.
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Old 02-21-2019, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,044 posts, read 993,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Can't argue with stats, though. Winters in East Tennessee are still sunnier than those of the Pacific Northwest, i.e. Boise, Spokane, Seattle, Vancouver, and Portland. Go look up their winter average sunshine. Absolutely abysmal and even worse than Chattanooga or Knoxville.
Actually, you can, since stats don't paint a complete picture. Clearly you dislike the NW (and need a better tour guide in the Cascades) and you're drawn to the SE, and that's fine. But have you visited or spent time in either region in the winter?

I'm just saying that the reality of what you experience on the ground is substantially different than the averages that you read about on the internet. The reality is more complicated, and there are trade-offs, positives and negatives for both.

Here are a couple other things to consider... First of all, for both regions, it's hard to generalize the weather. WA and OR have a huge variance in climates, from Oceanic maritime to alpine to desert, and the SE (let's say TN) is 450 miles long and varies from Gulf Coastal Plains to some of the highest elevations on the east coast. So just writing Spokane and Boise as "definitely" drearier than TN doesn't make that much sense and isn't all that accurate.

Regarding the amount of sunlight per day, it's also worth mentioning that at this far north in latitude, you may actually be more affected by the shorter days than the clouds or rain. Speaking of rain, you don't get nearly as much west of the Cascades in the winter as you think. Rain is more likely in Fall or Spring. And you generally don't get systems that frequently lay down large amounts of rain over several day periods, as is common in much of the SE. Another posted pointed out that's certainly been the case this winter. As RotseCherut mentioned, the form of precipitation you get east of the Cascades in the winter is generally snow and the air has much lower humidity than west of the Cascades or anything in the south. Again, preferences are subjective. The Southeast sounds like it will give you more of what you want, climate-wise, but I'm just not sure I'd give Knoxville or Chattanooga much of an edge in the "non-dreary winter" category. Again, they're big regions with big variations.

Back to the topic of this thread, for me it's a draw. I love the old, lush feeling of the Appalachians, but I also love the remote and more rugged feel of the Rockies. I've lived in both, and the winner for me is....the Cascades.
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Old 02-21-2019, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Im going to be honest. I never thought the Appalachians would do so well.
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Old Yesterday, 09:15 AM
 
Location: IN
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I plan on retiring in the Appalachian Mountains, buying a parcel this year, and then gradually improving on the parcel to add the drilled well, septic, electric, and then a maybe a house years down the road. It is close to the Ossipee Range, near Lake Winnipesaukee, and tons of other national forest lands and trails nearby. Why there? Price for land is about 1/4 as much as more desirable areas of the Rocky Mountains, less extreme climate, not very drought prone, and closer proximity to services and amenities. Downside, summer bugs and ticks due to warming climate and rapid decline of bat population.
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Old Yesterday, 12:00 PM
 
157 posts, read 49,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I plan on retiring in the Appalachian Mountains, buying a parcel this year, and then gradually improving on the parcel to add the drilled well, septic, electric, and then a maybe a house years down the road. It is close to the Ossipee Range, near Lake Winnipesaukee, and tons of other national forest lands and trails nearby. Why there? Price for land is about 1/4 as much as more desirable areas of the Rocky Mountains, less extreme climate, not very drought prone, and closer proximity to services and amenities. Downside, summer bugs and ticks due to warming climate and rapid decline of bat population.
Oh wow! That area is beautiful! Sounds like an awesome plan!
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