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Old 05-10-2008, 02:52 PM
 
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And no I don't think Chicago stacks up to Manhattan.
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Old 05-11-2008, 01:10 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
2,806 posts, read 14,967,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
I beg to differ. NYC, Los Angeles, and Chicago are the best.
Chicago and LA? Please....
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Old 05-11-2008, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Originally Posted by coldwine View Post
And? That doesn't disprove of anything I've said.
"People live in Chicago but move through Manhattan"

1.8 million people live in Manhattan, and 8 million in all of NYC.

I think its fair to say that people live in New York, even if you couldn't make it there. There's just so much hyperbole in your post, it kills whatever point you were trying to make.
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Old 05-11-2008, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,887 posts, read 12,190,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
There's been threads before comparing Chicago and New York. The similarities/differences/pros/cons. Comparing neighborhoods, etc.
Boston,Philly,SF way way closer to Chicago than Chicago is to NYC.

Please stop trying to compare Chicago with NYC
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Old 05-11-2008, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
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Lots of people live in Manhattan, they're just really rich. The Upper East Side has some of the wealthiest zip codes in the country. Lots of old money & new money living there.

Manhattan has always had a high percentage of transients as part of the population than is normal. However there is still a large number of people who live their entire lives in Manhattan, work down on Wall Street or Midtown, send their kids to expensive prep schools, and just generally live the high life.

I would assume that the same thing occurs in Chicago, just on a smaller scale?
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Old 05-11-2008, 12:56 PM
 
16 posts, read 9,603 times
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Originally Posted by mead View Post
Lots of people live in Manhattan, they're just really rich. The Upper East Side has some of the wealthiest zip codes in the country. Lots of old money & new money living there.

Manhattan has always had a high percentage of transients as part of the population than is normal. However there is still a large number of people who live their entire lives in Manhattan, work down on Wall Street or Midtown, send their kids to expensive prep schools, and just generally live the high life.

I would assume that the same thing occurs in Chicago, just on a smaller scale?
It occurs in Chicago in a much smaller scale.

The major reason why Manhattan has a pretty large transient rate is because most people cannot afford to live in Manhattan their whole life. Manhattan is the most expensive place in the country when you compare price per sq ft, far ahead even the poshest suburbs in the country like Greenwich, Palm Beach, Beverly Hills, etc. For example, if someone wants to start a family (while living comfortably), it is nearly impossible for them to live in Manhattan unless they are pretty well off and can shell out 2 million dollars + for a large enough place for their family, and $20-50,000 a year for private school, etc., etc..

In comparison, a couple can afford to start a family and stay in Chicago because Chicago is affordable.

People that move from Manhattan usually move to the boroughs, New Jersey, Westchester or Connecticut.
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Old 05-12-2008, 02:45 PM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,337,835 times
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Heres the thing.

Chicago (or Chicagoland) has this cohesiveness about it, which for all practical purposes is a good thing. People say their from Chicago, even way far about in the suburbs. They think of it as one entity. Thats good for a LOT of reasons.

The one problem (not really a problem) is that everyone, including natives/locals as well as transplants/visitors alike don't understand the huge differences within "Chicagoland"

reality that parts of Chicago (the city) are as vastly different from one another as it might be between the five burroughs of New York, or the differences between San Francisco and Oakland.

So when you say that people can't afford Manhattan so they move to the outer burroughs or to New Jersey, weheras Chicago is affordable.

The better way (that accounts for understanding the variation and huge differences in Chicago) is that: Gold Coast, Lincoln Park, Near North side, etc., etc., is too expensive (even though thats what a lot of people are looking for) so we move to the outlying edge of the city or the suburbs.

We have the same differences as you would have between Fort Worth and Dallas, Ann Arbor and Detroit, Los Angeles and Orange County, Washington D.C. and north Virginia.

Its just that "Chicagoland"

1. Has hardly any natural barriers: The Des Plaines River and Chicago river you could almost spit across, but I love the forest preserves! We don't have mountains, bays, WIDE rivers, state lines, etc. to break apart the sense of identity.

2. A HUGE downtown FAR bigger than anything else in the metro area.

3. No other BIG cities in Illinois

4. Almost the entire metro area (except for Kenosha(and thats debatable) and towns in Lake and Porter County, IN.

So there is the all-encompassing cohesiveness that doesn't take into account the differences.

Those are like "Chicagos Manhattan" Most of the visitors, transplants, as well as natives don't factor in the suburban city neighborhoods (Beverly, Edgebrook, etc.), the clannish (and kind of dirty (the buildings not the people))ethnic enclaves in places like Albany Park, Rogers Park, the devastated, Detroit-like west side, west of the medical district, or the segregated (either ghetto or the steak and potato, Superfans culture) of the south side.

Bottom line is: Chicago (and I haven't even discussed the rest of Cook County or the collar counties) has the same variation and distinction as anywhere else, we just don't have wide rivers, bays, mountains, and state lines to break apart that cohesiveness.
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