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Old 01-27-2012, 01:11 PM
 
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Saint Paul, Minnesota

The glorious Cathedral of Saint Paul


Rice Park and Landmark Centre Pics







In Saint Paul, on Cathedral hill, on Summit Avenue there are row after row after row of Victorian mansions.


Does this not look similar to the Paris photo posted before and others of European cities with the church or cathedral as the highest point? It is by design...





Saint Paul, Minnesota, very European

Last edited by glendog; 01-27-2012 at 02:01 PM..
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Old 01-27-2012, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glendog View Post
Saint Paul, Minnesota

Very European, no building is higher than the Cathedral...







In Saint Paul, on Cathedral hill, on Summit Avenue there are row after row after row of Victorian mansions.









Nice photos
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Old 01-27-2012, 01:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
Nice photos
Thanks, Saint Paul totally bowled me over starting with the circular park in downtown, Rice Park, which as anyone who has been to Europe knows is essential to many European cities circular grid systems. The streets in Saint Paul, date back to the early 1800's with a grid of sorts tying into that original lay out in the 1850's. Saint Paul, like Paris or London is a river city and ties it's history to it. In the 1850's this rough grid system began to tie into the older narrow streets that were based on the natural topography of the Mississippi river, the roads follow the high river bluffs and breaks and the result is a city of "town streets" that follow the river and "river streets" that go to the river. This leads many to many finding it to be a baffling collection of roads, with 6 and even 7 point intersections, and due to the original surveying being done so long ago leaves some very narrow major roads that meet with the "newer" (1850's and on) roads. So when all put together, this circular park, the cobblestones streets in many neighborhoods, the Cathedral at the high point of the city (which is again very truly European) and then row after row of old well maintained Victorian homes and Neo Classical buildings everywhere combined with this odd grid system give it very much a true European feel. I actually got shivers outside the Saint Paul hotel my first night there, not from the cold but from an eerie feeling that I was actually back in some European country, super cool under rated city.

BTW I correct myself, the Cathedral isn't technically the tallest anymore, but from pics it still appears to be near the highest point.

Last edited by glendog; 01-27-2012 at 02:46 PM..
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Old 01-27-2012, 01:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kagicre View Post
Yeah, I am from Europe (Germany) and I lived in Portland, and there is nothing European about it, but a few brick stone houses though. And I have been to Seattle and there isn't any European feel to it either.
I've lived in both Seattle and Portland as well and traveled around Europe a lot and I totally agree. There is absolutely nothing European about them.

Last edited by glendog; 01-27-2012 at 02:28 PM..
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Old 01-27-2012, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
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Very nice pictures of Saint Paul, but I don't think a few cathedrals or older, ornate buildings make for a "European-like" city. The layout and culture of many European cities is just vastly different from the cities in the U.S. In all of North America, only Quebec City really comes close to approximating a European-like city, and even there it's only in the Old City that you get that.

Boston's North End has it a bit, and looking back at San Francisco from the marina gives it a bit of a Mediterranean flair. But I find most U.S. cities to be, well, distinctly American. And that's neither necessarily good or bad, but just a reflection of how the city's developed and grew.
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Old 01-27-2012, 02:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lldd11 View Post
I lived in 3 European countries and actually was born in Europe... Some say here Boston looks European? Except for Newbury st, and some part of Cambridge nothing European about it... And certainly not the atmosphere, - cold, rude, unfriendly.. Maybe some part of California and NYC can make feel familiar someone from Europe, but I don't think anywhere else in USA you gonna find that feel... Some here ask - what you count European... If you never live in Europe its hard to explain.. Its the feel, when you can get out and actually walk in the city, look at vitrines of boutiques, sit in nice cafe outdoor, catch a cab, go to visit your friend without making plan 1 week ahead... Where you can get out and find things to do after, right there on the street.. Where people can talk to you and you can talk to them anywhere without afraid they can sue you for harrasment .. Where you can dress like fashion queen, put on your best hills and walk the streets without people thinking you are crazy... There is so much to it... You got to live it and feel it to understand.. Its not only architectural thing lol.
I'm been looking for place like that in USA for long time... even if its small town.. but I haven't find yet..
Your experience of people in Europe is very different then mine....

I loved the people, they were great.. especially if we were all drunk. Other then that, it seemed most people don't talk to other people unless they know them, certainly not strangers.

Here I find it very easy to strike up small talk with people, or just meet someone new.... its one of the most common things ever. Also the fashion while better overall in Europe, is certainly only in some areas.... LA and NYC has more fashion than Paris IMO
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Old 01-27-2012, 02:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 14thandYou View Post
Very nice pictures of Saint Paul, but I don't think a few cathedrals or older, ornate buildings make for a "European-like" city. The layout and culture of many European cities is just vastly different from the cities in the U.S. In all of North America, only Quebec City really comes close to approximating a European-like city, and even there it's only in the Old City that you get that.

Boston's North End has it a bit, and looking back at San Francisco from the marina gives it a bit of a Mediterranean flair. But I find most U.S. cities to be, well, distinctly American. And that's neither necessarily good or bad, but just a reflection of how the city's developed and grew.
Yeah I mostly agree and totally agree with Quebec City, it really is unto itself in this category. But I have to correct you and say it's not "a few cathedrals or older ornate buildings" by any stretch in Saint Paul, it's by far and away the vast majority of buildings in the city, I just don't have the time or patience to post every pic I can just the best examples. Every neighborhood is packed with these old ornate old buildings. It's layout, with the old giant cathedral near the high point of the city, the circular park at the center with the old cobblestone streets spiraling out from it like in many European cities, the old "grid" and all the old buildings and homes everywhere make it very unique amongst US cities and by comparison, very European in feel, but yes, by strictly American standards! Saint Paul is a much looked over city and totally different than say...Minneapolis. Many people don't know that.

Last edited by glendog; 01-27-2012 at 02:57 PM..
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Old 01-27-2012, 06:51 PM
 
192 posts, read 383,625 times
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Originally Posted by 14thandYou View Post
Very nice pictures of Saint Paul, but I don't think a few cathedrals or older, ornate buildings make for a "European-like" city. The layout and culture of many European cities is just vastly different from the cities in the U.S. In all of North America, only Quebec City really comes close to approximating a European-like city, and even there it's only in the Old City that you get that.

Boston's North End has it a bit, and looking back at San Francisco from the marina gives it a bit of a Mediterranean flair. But I find most U.S. cities to be, well, distinctly American. And that's neither necessarily good or bad, but just a reflection of how the city's developed and grew.
However it's not just old buildings...There are so many different places in Europe and the US it's so hard to say this is European or that is American. Not all European buildings and cities are just old especially after WWII and now some US have older buildings than say Berlin, which is strikingly like Minneapolis in terms of old and brand new modern architecture. I lived in Seattle for 15 years and San Francisco for 4 years and neither ever felt like Europe to me, even the marinas..very cool (albeit expensive cities0 but not European. I've traveled all over Europe and the US and Canada as well. I've been from Greece to Norway and into Russia and I can tell you there's a wide range of people and cultures in Europe as well as mass transit systems, good and bad just like the US. But the article wasn't what city is European, it was what US city is the most European and I still maintain, aesthetically, culturally, and in general feel of old world meets new Saint Paul is the most European US city I've ever been to in the US for all the reasons I stated above. The overall feel, culturally is very European, and last week the Dutch and Norwegian skaters at the Red Bull Crashed Ice event in Saint Paul agreed. Check the youtube videos. I think it will only continue to grow in that regard as well as people on the coasts wise up and realize how much value there is in places like Saint Paul and Minneapolis and others up to the hilliest city in the USA, the world's largest inland port serving sea going vessels from all over the planet, Duluth. Now that place is almost surreal in it's uniqueness!
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Old 01-27-2012, 07:08 PM
 
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I'd say Providence Ri, Hilly, cities with thin windy roads, plazas, public squares, an insane amount of churchs, and in Most neigborhoods, Churchs dominate the skyline with seas of Tudor housing (particually in College and Federal hill) and several prominate rivers (4)
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Old 01-28-2012, 12:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
KC and Seville!

Kansas City, MO













Seville, Spain




Actually other than the half scale replica of the Torre, the plaza feels in scale, design and layout more like a Mexican or southwestern city, not the tight Medieval streets and back alleys of Seville. The detailing is not as rich reflecting the time and culture in which it was built.

If anything KC is one of the most "American" cities I know, grided streets, some garden city, and city beautiful touches, the foward thinking Louis Curtiss (ironically Canadian) , big lawns even in older historic areas, the streamline of art deco, plain detailing, lots of American craftsman examples.

In the midwest lots of places including some small towns have bits and pieces that you can visulize in Europe. Even the great American machine, Chicago, can feel like Europe just due to detailing and density. But as far as having those qualities that make Europe feel like Europe, street morphology, density, neighborhood centers, (as opposed to large centralized downtown districs) walkability, building detailing, etc... I would have to say Cinci and St. Louis lead the way with Milwaukee following up. I have not been to St. Paul in 20 years so my memories of it are not accurate to comment.
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