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Old 02-20-2009, 03:42 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Palm trees can grow pretty much anywhere. Of course they are native only to tropical areas but they can be grown, as Steve-o correctly pointed out, as far north as the Great Lakes. Chicago even has lined its beaches on Lake Michigan with palm trees. Here in St. Louis, a few palm trees exist on the SLU campus. Of course, since STL and Chitown are both the Midwest, palm trees are still pretty scarce. They are planted, not native. Palm trees are native to California, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and of course, Florida. I would imagine that Virginia has them too. They are mainly only native to coastal areas I think. I'm sure the Northeast has to have them since there is ocean there and possibly the Pacific Northwest.
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Old 02-20-2009, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Teaneck, NJ
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hahah, i noticed that FL palms are usually dead too.

I like SC and NC palms
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Old 02-20-2009, 08:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradly View Post
I like the palm trees at New Mexico State university.. they look awesome!
I might be going there for college in the fall.
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Old 02-20-2009, 08:55 PM
 
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We even have a scattering of palms as far north as Atlanta...I don't think they can survive the winter any further north, except on the coast.


Oakland Cemetery palms on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/h1113/2777307936/ - broken link) Cactus Car Wash on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nsaidi/387347466/ - broken link)



May 11, 2007 - Day 45 on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/tmac0381/494369183/ - broken link) P1221774-Patio-Light-Shadows on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/18814459@N00/3219166848/ - broken link)



Wigwam on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jcknight/2267814818/ - broken link)
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Old 02-20-2009, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,191 posts, read 2,260,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
States that have cities and towns with palm trees---

California
Arizona
New Mexico
Texas
Utah (I bet most people dont even realize this) St.George,UT
Nevada
Louisiana
Mississippi
Alabama
Georgia
Florida
South Carolina
I think even North Carolina
Virgina Beach has some but from what I have seen they look terrible
Arkansas can grow some but I dont think there are really any towns that do.
Virginia Beach Palm Trees: Look nice to me !




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Old 02-20-2009, 09:22 PM
 
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The most variety I see are in far south TX and south florida, both which can go all the way to coconut (although the occasional cold spells can destroy them).
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Old 02-20-2009, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Richmond
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BTW- I have seen Palm Trees in my neighborhood in Richmond,VA. Of course during the winter, they dry up, but come back to life around late May.
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Old 02-27-2009, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Purcellville, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucidus View Post
Actually, I think there would be quite a few. All of these states I believe have some native Palms:

North Carolina
South Carolina
Georga
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arizona
Nevada
California
Hawaii
Virginia

I added Virginia because there are a few stands of apparently native Sabal Minor in extreme souteastern costa lowlands and swampy areas. For those not familliar, Sabal Minor are very similar to the well known Sabal Palmetto, excpet they rarely if ever grow a true above ground trunk, and if they do, it is usually only several feet, and hidden by the foliage.

No one can be SURE if they are native or not, but they were definatly not planted by people in the middle of those areas, which are in usually in the middle of swampy/ marshy areas near the coast, away from population, and close to the VA/NC border. I suppose since they are common in eastern NC, birds could have deposited seeds in SE VA, and they grew. But wouldnt that make then "native"?
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Old 02-27-2009, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Purcellville, VA
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Default More Washington D.C. Palms

During a recent jaunt down town, I took these photos on 2/1/2009. These palms are in Downtown Washington, D.C., your nation's Capital City.

Trachycarpus Fortunei in front of the National Air and Space museum. I believe this and all the other palms in this very large "planter" have been there for 8-10 years. I know have have seen these palms since 2001.

This palm is mostly hidden from view from the street during the warm months as it is surrounded by a forest of Musa Basjoo (Bananas) that come back each spring, and usually grow as tall as, or taller than the palm. It is about 15 feet tall, and in my opinion needs to be "cleaned up" just a bit. It appears it has been several years since it last went to seed. This palm is unprotected, however it is on the south side of a HUGE building that is a couple city blocks long.



The view from across Independence Avenue.



Two larger Rapidophyllum Hystrix (Needle Palms)right next to the large Windmill. Also farther down you can see a "grove" of larger Sabal Minor.



View from the opposite end of the huge planter. Closest to the camera is the "grove" of larger Sabal Minor. Im not sure how many plants are in it, but I would guess somewhere around 15-20. Its pretty thick. In the distance is the Windmill. There are Sabal Minor seedlings spread all over the place, and in many of the near by planters as well. There are also Needle palm seedlings mixed in. Some of the seedlings appear to be at least a couple years old now and a few that are starting to produce fan leaves. You can see in the foreground all the babies. They look like large blades of grass, and those are just the ones that sprouted close by the mother plants.



This is at the corner of 3rd St. and Independence Aveneue, SW. It is just outside of the new "National Garden" section of the US Botanical Garden. It is a group of 5 Rapidophyllum Hystrix, varying in size from medium to large. I was here this past summer, and do not remember seeing these palms. The National Garden section is still relatively new ( 2 years or so) so they may have been there for just about that long, but probably not any longer. They even look like newer plantings to me.



Close up of one of the Needle Palms from above. This one stands about 4 to 4 and 1/2 feet from the top of tallest leaf to the ground. You do not often see the "trunk" of these palms, and this one appears to be even more rare as it is a single trunk with no apparent "pups" or suckers.




This Sabal Minor is one of the smaller ones in another "grove" that is at the corner of 1st and Independence Ave. SW. Note the label. In particular, the distribution. I am not sure that is entirely correct, as these palms I believe are native as far north as eastern North Carolina. There are large stands of these, and the individual palms are very large, in eastern NC, on the coastal plains, and in lowland coastal forests, and some native stands in the same areas of extreme southeastern VA.


A wider shot of the "Grove" from above. There are about 8 in this "grove". None of these are as large as the ones that are in front of the National Air and Space museum however.

Lastly, a lone Trachycarpus Wanigarus ( a variety of windmill palm) in the "childrens garden" section of the US Botanical Gardens. It is in one of a few outdoor sections that lie between some of the smaller conservatories that surround the large central conservatory. It remains unprotected. This palm has been there approximately 3 years. These outdoor areas were re done after the entire gardens underwent massive renovations about 3-4 years ago. In another outdoor area, there are many more needle palms, sabal minors, and Yuccas, and even Saw Palmetto (Serenoa Repens) growing outdoors unprotected for several years now.

Last edited by United_Caps_Skins_Fan; 02-27-2009 at 02:03 PM..
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Old 02-27-2009, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richmonder27 View Post
Virginia Beach Palm Trees: Look nice to me !



Those Va Beach palms are interesting to see. 15 years ago, none of them were there! I think each new hotel that opens there plants these hardy palms to try and give the place a more "tropical" appeal. I grew up in the Va Beach area and palms were certainly not a part of our experience. These things are new there.

Point Pleasant Beach in New Jersey has palms in the sand during the summer months, but they're pulled out at the end of every season. The winters here are just too cold. You have to go to the Winter Garden (an indoor atrium) to see palms here in Winter!
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