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Old 02-27-2009, 11:00 PM
 
367 posts, read 1,177,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Actually, we're seeing them more and more...there are a variety of palms that will grow here. They just aren't native to the area.
I agree. I think you will see more and more palms in Atlanta as years pass by. Atlanta is a warm zone 8 so no problems growing hardy palms there.

Palms aren't even native to California. I've read that palms in California started by man planting palms. As they were planted, California's mild weather supported seedlings. Before you knew it, it was spreading like crazy. Overtime some species got second names such as California palm.
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Old 02-27-2009, 11:07 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,452,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by popalnet View Post
All of downtown DC and most parts of DC, VA, and MD surrounding the potomac and chesapeake are a cold zone 8. Here's one of several links: Horticulture/USDA Hardiness Zones - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks

Atlanta is a solid zone 8 and you don't see palms all over Atlanta and you definitely don't see Mexcian and California palms in Atlanta. Even in the warmer east coast zones such as zone 9, 10, or 11 in south florida you don't see any Mexican or California palms. To make such a statement like that says that you're a dumbazz.

I'm not saying DC has mild winters. DC winters are harsh. But even with its harsh winters parts of DC are classified as zone 8. Palms are not noticable at all, but some people are experimenting with them and they're having good luck with no protection, as some of the photos in this forum show.


yes, I know what some people can grow, I've seen windmill palms being grown in Minnessota,Canada,NYC,Michigan,Salt Lake City and other cold places. I even grew a few in a zone 7b climate.

Southern NM is a zone 8 and plenty of CA and MX fan palms there along with St.George,UT,Las Vegas,Tucson,El Paso,San Antonio and a few other locals. I know they are more acclimated to a dry climate but I have seen pics of them in Florida also, so maybe your the dumbazz.
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Old 02-27-2009, 11:20 PM
 
367 posts, read 1,177,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
yes, I know what some people can grow, I've seen windmill palms being grown in Minnessota,Canada,NYC,Michigan,Salt Lake City and other cold places. I even grew a few in a zone 7b climate.

Southern NM is a zone 8 and plenty of CA and MX fan palms there along with St.George,UT,Las Vegas,Tucson,El Paso,San Antonio and a few other locals. I know they are more acclimated to a dry climate but I have seen pics of them in Florida also, so maybe your the dumbazz.
Of course the mexican and california fan palms you mention can grow in Florida if someone plants them. But why the hell would you grow such an ugly looking dessert looking palm in Florida when you can natively grow much prettier looking palms.

I didn't meant to be offensive by calling you a dumbazz, but to say that a zone 8 climate qualifies a place to have palms all over the place is a dumbazz statement. Maybe the areas that you're talking about are zone 8b which borders zone 9. Yes, it's common to have palms in those areas. DC is more of a zone 7, but because of the potomac river, chesapeake bay, and urban heat island effect, it's a freezing cold zone 8.
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Old 02-28-2009, 04:10 AM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,118,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
if DC is a zone 8 then they should have palms all over the city then, big ones like Mexican and California fan palms. It would be in the same gardening zone as El Paso,TX.
This isn't true USDA zones are based off of the lowest temperature a city will ever see. Believe or not El Paso has a record low of -8F while DC has a record low of only -5F. That qualifies them to be in the same climate zone.

El Paso sees an average of 59 days at or below freezing (usually no lower than 25) while DC sees an average of 71 days below freezing. While this doesn't seem like much of a difference, DC often sees winter days that don't get above 40, while that never happens in El Paso. The number of hours a day a city has temperatures below freezing significantly affects the type of vegetation that grows in a location. So while El Paso may experience freezing temperatures from 2AM to 7AM most winter mornings, the temperature doesn't stay cold all day, thereby allowing palms to grow well.
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Old 02-28-2009, 06:18 AM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
2,035 posts, read 4,523,062 times
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LMAO!!!!!!!!!!..who ever says that there are NO NATIVE species of Palms..in CA.. HAS NOT done their homework.....Washingtonia filifera IS VERY native to the desert areas of CA..and W. robusta is native to Baja CA..and parts of N. Mexico..

The reason that both of these species often don't "look as well in say Miami..is because of their genetics..IE they prefer hot dry heat over hot wet heat...yes they can do well and ARE OFTEN seen THROUGHOUT FL. but you are better off with species like Adonidia, Pinanga, Ptychosperma, Archontophoenis alexandrae, Roystonea, many of the Copernicias, Dictyosperma, Hyophorbe, most Pritchardias, Metroxylon, Licuala, and Johanesteijsmannia...just to name a few...

All of these are descended from similar-to Miami's climate..and would do better there, provided that their cultural conditions were met...

Most of these species don't do as well here in CA..(or flat out die..quickly..) because of our drier, Mediterranian type climate..where species like many of the Phoenix, Rhopalostylis, Hedyscepe, Howea, Ravena, Jubea, Butia, Brahea, many Dypsis, and many of the Livingstona species are supurb..A few of these,..mainly Butia, and Brahea are being found to be hardier to the cold than was once first thought..and may have potential in some of the cooler regions of the country...

Remember that while two areas of the country might have the same basic climate set up..there are regional, local, and micro climatical conditions you have to consider regarding how likely something might succeed in a given area...9B here is a wet/coolish winter, hot/dry summer..while 9B in Tampa is a mild/drier winter, hot/ humid/ and wet summer..not everything from either area will succeed if planted in it's regional opposite...I mean..while you may certainly succeed with An African Tulip Tree or Royal Poinciana in Tampa..You are lucky..if that same African Tulip Tree gets to and hangs around 10-12 feet here..and while it MIGHT..be possible..a Royal Poinciana here is going to have some very real challenges handling our cool wet winters...

Plants have the capacity to adapt..but attempting to push.. say a Johanesteijsmannia magnifica in our climate..or even Tampa's is a sure recipe at falure...to be 100% successfull would take decades of a slow continuous, progressive generational step northward into increasingly cooler territory..IE..obtain seed of J. magnifica from a Key largo source..and grow in Homestead..then start seed from the Homestead plants in Naples or say 20 miles north of homestead of the Atlantic side..and so on..out of the 100 plants you might get up and going..only a few will show genetic traits which will assure fruther adaptabillity to cooler temps..or drier air..

Ofcourse there are instances where a genus like Roystonea contains species which can do just as well in Phoenix..as in Port Charlotte..and this is an advantage when trying to push it further into cooler areas..like my back yard..Just wish i could get Adonidia and a nice lipstick palm to grow up here..guess a palm nut can dream....
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Old 02-28-2009, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Albany (school) NYC (home)
893 posts, read 2,517,916 times
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When I think of Palm Trees. I think of paradise. Clean, sunny, blue skies, little lizzards. AHHH I need a vacation.
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Old 02-28-2009, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
yes, I know what some people can grow, I've seen windmill palms being grown in Minnessota . . . Michigan.
No way. There ARE a few potted outdoor palms in Michigan in the SUMMER, but they're seasonal only - brought indoors for the winter. There's NO WAY any palm tree could survive a Michigan or Minnesota winter.
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Old 02-28-2009, 12:51 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,322,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
North Carolina--

Ummm, that's Riverfront Park in Charleston, LOL. But there are palmetto trees in Wilmington and along the NC coast.
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Old 02-28-2009, 01:10 PM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
2,035 posts, read 4,523,062 times
Reputation: 1094
Are you 110% sure of this???..i believe that there are at least a couple species which ARE being grown outdoors as far north as parts of Canada...and this includes taking on the winter extremes there...
I think if those species should also be able to handle MOST of what Michigan might throw at them...

Great picture of Sabal palmetto!!..this is another great species for cooler areas..
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Old 02-28-2009, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
Reputation: 3232
I live in Michigan, and I've never seen a natural growing palm tree here. I really doubt any species could survive subzero temperatures and feet of snow.
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