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Old 02-28-2009, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by si33 View Post
Are you 110% sure of this???..i believe that there are at least a couple species which ARE being grown outdoors as far north as parts of Canada...and this includes taking on the winter extremes there...
I think if those species should also be able to handle MOST of what Michigan might throw at them...

Great picture of Sabal palmetto!!..this is another great species for cooler areas..

I've seen quite a few in Canada, but they were all in British Columbia - super mild climate for up there.
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Old 02-28-2009, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Saint Petersburg, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by popalnet View Post
To make such a statement like that is inaccurate. All of downtown DC and most parts of DC, VA, and MD surrounding the potomac and chesapeake are a cold zone 8. Here's one of several links: Horticulture/USDA Hardiness Zones - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks

Atlanta is a solid zone 8 and you don't see palms all over Atlanta and you definitely don't see Mexcian and California palms in Atlanta. Even in the warmer east coast zones such as zone 9, 10, or 11 in south florida you don't see any Mexican or California palms.

I'm not saying DC has mild winters. DC winters are harsh. But even with its harsh winters parts of DC are classified as zone 8. Palms are not noticable at all, but some people are experimenting with them and they're having good luck with no protection, as some of the photos in this forum show.

This is very true, however, having been born and raised here in Washington, D.C. I would no longer classify our winters as being "harsh". True, this winter has been somewhat colder than average, and has been MUCH colder than any winter in the past 12 years or so. However, we just do not have the extreme harsh winters we had in the 70's/ 80's when I was a kid. The Potomac river hardly EVER freezes over at all anymore, and the last time we have seen a snow fall greater than 8 inches was back in 2003 I think. We did have one snow of 8" in feb of 06. We have been blow average in snowfall for quite sometime. It just does not snow here nearly as much anymore.

Also, keep in mind the urban heat island affect, that, coupled with being close to a good bit of water which never freezes anymore does moderate the temps here. In the past 10 years or so, I have had MANY plants which are planted as annuals here, survive winter just fine and regrow next spring. Things which usually seed, then die off, then grow from the seeds again next spring, are now not dying off at all. Also, there are more and more banan's being planted, which are now corm / root hardy here, as well as lots of things like Oleander, and more varieties of Camellia are being grown here as hardy. As you can see from my photos, the colder hardy palms are becoming more and more commonplace here as people are starting to lear about them, and that they will not only survive here, but thrive here given proper care and siting.

Also, people should remember that there are fairly big/ signifigant differences, even WITHIN the same zone. That is why at some point the USDA further devided the hardiness zones into a/b categories. DC and inner Northern VA, and parts of inner suburban MD would fall squarely into a cold zone 8A. Atlanta is much more of an 8B, as is Virginia Beach. There is a pretty big difference between temps and weather in Virginia Beachs zone 8, and DCs zone 8. Its much warmer there, and much less chance of any frozen percipitation annually. You can also tell by what grows there vs what grows in DC. Some colder hardy palms are fine here, where in Virginia Beach, Sabal Palmettos, while not native, are planted all over the place, and usually survive winters there just fine. Virginia Beach is also the northern most reaches of naturally occuring Spanish Moss.
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Old 02-28-2009, 02:48 PM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
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Huh..interesting..funny that many of the top authorities including the International Palm Society have published numerous articles..and books..about the cold tolerance of Palms..then again these people have spent 15-30++ years doing intensive research into all areas concerning these plants..

And no..i don't believe there are any species which could withstand the really cold/permanently frozen polar areas of Canada or Alaska..Then again,..they have found fossilized remains of Palms in those areas..could there be a modern day descendant species out there from this??...its a possibility..

United_caps, congrats!!..welcome to the world of palm addiction..lol..and id pass on the oleanders..very poisonous and just a pain in the..well you know..
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Old 02-28-2009, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Saint Petersburg, FL
414 posts, read 788,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by si33 View Post
Huh..interesting..funny that many of the top authorities including the International Palm Society have published numerous articles..and books..about the cold tolerance of Palms..then again these people have spent 15-30++ years doing intensive research into all areas concerning these plants..

And no..i don't believe there are any species which could withstand the really cold/permanently frozen polar areas of Canada or Alaska..Then again,..they have found fossilized remains of Palms in those areas..could there be a modern day descendant species out there from this??...its a possibility..

United_caps, congrats!!..welcome to the world of palm addiction..lol..and id pass on the oleanders..very poisonous and just a pain in the..well you know..

Thanks! I have been an addict of palms for most of my life, though I have just started growing them here within the last 8 years. Im not planning on any Oleanders. Oleanders im pretty sure are related to Plumeria, and I have one Plumeria, and that is enough for me. And no, my Plumeria does NOT winter outdoors. LOL!


In response to your comments and others about palms in Canada, there most certainly are palms in Canada. They are only located however in western BC, in places such as Vancouver, Victoria, Richmond... all very close to the coastal sections of BC. I have been to Vancouver and have seen Windmills growing all over the place there. They are definitely there. Do a google search on Palm Trees in Vancouver, and youll find tons of pics.

Palms also grow in Seattle, and Portland OR as well with no problems. They are easily a zone 8B, pushing zone 9 in all of those areas, and can grow more than just the super cold hardy palms. I have seen Canary Island Date palms in Portland and Seattle myself, as well as some King Sago's. The PNW in general is an extremely temperate climate, with most of the worlds remaining temperate rain forest occuring from SE Alaska down through western Oregon, and parts of Northern California.
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Old 02-28-2009, 05:12 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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I have seen palm trees in a garden in Duisburg, Germany Looks weird, but thanks to the changing climate palm trees can be planted along almost the entire Rhine valley as well as in NW Germany. But really, it looks odd because palm trees look stupid when the sun does not shine, let alone when it rains. Same goes for Ireland and Britain where palm trees have been planted for quite some time. But they do look nice near the Atlantic coastline.

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Old 02-28-2009, 08:33 PM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
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Nice picture!!..like the use of Hosta, Blue Poppies(Meconopsis betonicifolia) and the understory plantings of Gunnera scattered below those windmills..
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Old 02-28-2009, 11:01 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,451,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
I live in Michigan, and I've never seen a natural growing palm tree here. I really doubt any species could survive subzero temperatures and feet of snow.

of course there is no such thing as a natural growing palm tree in Michigan,if you ever get onto the gardenweb forums your will see people and their pics of palms they grow in cold cold regions, of course they protect the hell out of em but they are still there.

michigan palm tree







Chicago palm



there is also a guy on there from Minnessota that has grown a good sized windmill palm over the years, it looks really healthy, I just cant find a pic right now.
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Old 03-01-2009, 05:59 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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Actually, botanists in northern countries have been breeding more resistant palm trees for some time now. But palm trees growing in Michigan, amazing But I imagine they don't grow to great heights, do they? There probably won't be a Sunset Boulevard in Detroit
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Old 03-01-2009, 06:35 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
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here's some more

Northern Utah palm--



Southeast Minnesota palm


Delaware-


Kentucky--
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Old 03-01-2009, 09:39 PM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
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Again,..nice pictures..like the one from Minnesota.. The taller one in the Utah pict. is actually producing flower stalks too...neat..
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