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Old 07-15-2009, 05:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
have the climate for Palm Trees, period.
I know. But nascarguy said palm trees don't look right in big cities like NYC. Size is irrelevant.
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Old 07-15-2009, 06:34 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucidus View Post
Depends on the type of palm. Washingtonia filifera and Washingtonia robusta are common in California and are native to dry climates. They will grow in humid areas but usually look much better dryer locales.

Washingtonia robusta in Los Angeles:



As for your other question, any state with zone 7 (pink zone) hardiness or warmer can usually support some kind of palm, but to have large palms probably zone 8 (green zone, not the bright green but the other one south of the pink) or warmer is required.
Shouldn't global warming have raised every "zone" north by 500 miles or so???

I'm convinced that within the next 5 years we will have successfully kept palm trees alive on the Jersey Shore - it might be the southernmost part of the shore, and it might take a few more winters, but I think soon NJ will have palm trees on the beaches. Go Global Warming! Use Aerosols to warm up NJ!!! We want Palm Trees!!!
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Old 07-15-2009, 08:17 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,744,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
Let's see what happens to those palm trees in Rockefeller Center around Christmas. Think they will still be there when they put up the tree and all the angels?????? Palm trees in the snow?

Bye, bye palm trees.
Yeah I agree, palms don't look good in snow. Good thing I hate snow.
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Old 07-16-2009, 03:16 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Yeah I agree, palms don't look good in snow. Good thing I hate snow.
It pretty much never snows in NYC anymore.
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Old 07-16-2009, 04:16 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,964,931 times
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Default But it was 9 degrees

Quote:
Originally Posted by BergenCountyJohnny View Post
It pretty much never snows in NYC anymore.
the end of last January when I was there. It may be getting warmer (old enough to remember decades ago), but the fact remains it still gets below freezing in the NY area.

I will have to ask my daughter what happens to those palm trees in that LI mall since it is right near where she lives. I am betting they won't be there around by Thanksgiving, let alone Christmas.

Why do you want to change a place from it's natural habitate? Go to Florida if you want palm trees and beaches. Leave the natural flora of NY alone.
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Old 07-16-2009, 09:06 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
the end of last January when I was there. It may be getting warmer (old enough to remember decades ago), but the fact remains it still gets below freezing in the NY area.

I will have to ask my daughter what happens to those palm trees in that LI mall since it is right near where she lives. I am betting they won't be there around by Thanksgiving, let alone Christmas.

Why do you want to change a place from it's natural habitate? Go to Florida if you want palm trees and beaches. Leave the natural flora of NY alone.
It definitely does get below freezing here, yes. It seems to go from too warm to snow to too cold to snow most of the time. The snow is rare. I would prefer a little more snow and a little less of the extreme below-zero temps.

I would think that palm trees in a mall are fine - a mall never gets cold inside. The palm trees in the malls in Jersey last as long as they want them to.

As for palm trees and Florida, there are no palm trees native to Florida, they were all planted by settlers who brought them from all over the Caribbean. I know what you mean - that they are natural in Florida where they can live and thrive, but it wasn't always like that. I still hold out hope for NJ to have palm trees adapting to our beaches in the not too distant future!
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Old 07-17-2009, 08:39 AM
 
2,414 posts, read 4,989,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BergenCountyJohnny View Post
It definitely does get below freezing here, yes. It seems to go from too warm to snow to too cold to snow most of the time. The snow is rare. I would prefer a little more snow and a little less of the extreme below-zero temps.

I would think that palm trees in a mall are fine - a mall never gets cold inside. The palm trees in the malls in Jersey last as long as they want them to.

As for palm trees and Florida, there are no palm trees native to Florida, they were all planted by settlers who brought them from all over the Caribbean. I know what you mean - that they are natural in Florida where they can live and thrive, but it wasn't always like that. I still hold out hope for NJ to have palm trees adapting to our beaches in the not too distant future!
Not true. There are 12 palm species native to Florida.

Centeral Florida Palm and Cycad Society (CFPACS) (http://www.plantapalm.com/centralfl/NewsNativePalms.asp - broken link)
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Old 01-11-2010, 08:29 PM
 
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If you go to the National Zoo in Washington DC, they have some growing outside. I saw some in late Decemeber growing fine outside the Ape House.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaBear View Post
Remember that the built up areas of DC are a tad warmer than outside the Beltway, especially the parts north or west of the city towards Dulles, Potomic, Rockville, etc.

Admittedly; I never saw a local palm tree while growing up in DC/NoVa over 30 years ago.
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Old 01-20-2010, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Saint Petersburg, FL
414 posts, read 788,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PITTSTON2SARASOTA View Post
That's funny...I call them Q-TIPS.......in coastal Sarasota we seem to get little rain and the "trees" are over pruned; so they generally never look lush nor tropical. Also, I am sure someone has already mentioned that palms are really NOT trees but are related to GRASSES, but they can grow tall...lol.

LOL! That is absolutely laughable and absolutely false. Palms are definitely NOT grasses, nor closely related to them. Bamboo, yes, Palms? No.
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Old 01-21-2010, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,037,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
What does the size of the city have to do with anything? Palm trees grow in a city based on climate, not size.
In my opinion, the I-20 corridor is basically the dividing line to where palm trees are appropriate and where they are not. They look tacky in a city like NYC but look awesome and compliment cities like Miami. I think palm trees need to stay unique to the gulf and west coasts and not spread throughout the entire US. I am real big on integrating urban development with an area's natural surroundings. The natural flora of an area has a ton to do with the feel of an area and what makes it unique every bit as much as the urban amenities the area offers, from NY to Atlanta to Albuquerque to Los Angeles. Why would I want to be in New Jersey and feel like I'm in Florida?
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