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Old 08-05-2008, 04:36 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 5,931,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattias View Post
What is the lowest temperature can palms survive?
If varies widely. Many of tropical palms rely just as much, if not more, on precipitation than temperature. For example the coconut palm relies on cold season temperatures that drop no lower than 32 degrees. However, they also rely on 60%-80% relative humidity a large amount of they year, a significant part of the year with temperatures between 82-99 degrees, and a high amount of rainfall. Many other tropical palms that you see in South Florida (WPB, Miami, Fort Myers, Key West) are right on the edge of their survival limit, so they're are really not good to experiment with outside of that area.

The most cold-hardy palm is the Needle palm, which can take very brief temperatures down to -6 degrees. The Sabal Palmetto, one of the most widely planted palms in the South can take brief periods of temperatures down to 7 degrees. The California Fan Palm, one of the more popular palm trees in California, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and extreme Southwestern Utah can take temperatures down to 14 degrees. The Mexican Fan Palm, another popular palm tree in the Southwest and along the Gulf Coast can take temperatures down to about 14 degrees, as well.
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Old 08-05-2008, 06:12 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,143,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Those palm tree photos were taken in the absolute warmest part of New Mexico. Areas around Carlsbad don't see average low temperature dip below 31 degrees any month of the year. That type of climate is conducive to growing Mexican Fan palms.

I dont think Carlsbad,NM has too many palms, they should though, my pic was of Las Cruces.
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Old 08-05-2008, 06:35 PM
 
3,408 posts, read 8,477,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Illinois too! LOLOLOL





I dont even know what it is... some type of fan palm? Anyways, a lot of people here use palms of different varieties from May until late September, then they go back inside, except this guys' palm that stays outside year round. LOL Does that count? HAHAHA
I recently saw a picture of the lakefront in Chicago with a few palms. I couldn't believe it when I saw it. I thought they were either fake or just there during the summer months, (or global warming is really taking effect, lol).

I was surprised to see palm trees (smaller ones) in the Metro Atlanta area when I went earlier this summer.
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Old 08-05-2008, 07:13 PM
 
Location: The NY, NJ, CT Tri-State Region
94 posts, read 117,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
How do these survive the winter? Do they pull them up and put them inside or cover them like in that VA beach pic?
Like dumb@sses, they just let them die. What a waste of $100-$350 dollars (per palm). The biggies are cabbage palms (I think), the state tree of FL and SC, and they do not protect them. Wouldn't matter anyway cuz they're planting straight into beach sand--IMO not a good place for a palm (or any plant) to grow and thrive. They're there as annual novelties. I suppose if they actually sited them next to buildings on south facing walls AND protected them, they could make it through the winter quite easily.

Here are palms in winter in NJ (no protection, but they would die anyway do to being in sand that dessicates root systems and too much salt water intrusion):



Better sited Cabbage palms might have a fighting chance. I would like to grow palms here in CT, but I know next to nothing about the purported legendary cold hardy palms that can survive below zero. Haven't seen any in nurseries around here either.
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Old 08-05-2008, 07:16 PM
 
Location: The NY, NJ, CT Tri-State Region
94 posts, read 117,511 times
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IMO they are really cool looking plants... if only I had the know how to cultivate them successfully here in CT! (You CAN do it, I have seen pictures of them looking great after winter)
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Old 08-05-2008, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Midessa, Texas Home Yangzhou, Jiangsu temporarily
1,505 posts, read 3,758,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeYanxfan View Post
IMO they are really cool looking plants... if only I had the know how to cultivate them successfully here in CT! (You CAN do it, I have seen pictures of them looking great after winter)
You could give a go. Get a good cold hardy species. In the winter build a tomato cage around it and fill it with leaves, be sure to cover the crown. On warmer winter days check to make sure that there is no fungus or insect infestation.

Or you could try wrapping a pipe heater around the trunk and especially on the crown near where new fronds grow and wrap the whole thing with pipe insulation. Just be careful not to start a fire.

I grow robustas in West Texas ( zone 7b). Usually the temps are fine but every now and then we will have a bitter cold spell and I will use the pipe heater trick to protect them.

Here is a picture of mine in the snow a couple of years ago.



And here the following summer.




Last winter wasn't very cold so they look better now but I don't have any recent photos.
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Old 08-05-2008, 08:45 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,143,654 times
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those West Texas palm look great,, post some new pics if you can get some.
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Old 08-06-2008, 09:19 AM
 
257 posts, read 990,662 times
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ahhh...a whole thread on palm trees. does not get much better lol
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Old 08-06-2008, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 67,942,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
I recently saw a picture of the lakefront in Chicago with a few palms. I couldn't believe it when I saw it. I thought they were either fake or just there during the summer months, (or global warming is really taking effect, lol).

I was surprised to see palm trees (smaller ones) in the Metro Atlanta area when I went earlier this summer.
Those palms on the beach are only seasonal. They bring them out for spring, summer and early fall, then they go back inside for the winter. There are a few species of fan palm that can survive here in winter, thats about it.
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Old 08-06-2008, 10:02 AM
 
Location: los angeles
5,031 posts, read 11,052,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Those palms on the beach are only seasonal. They bring them out for spring, summer and early fall, then they go back inside for the winter. There are a few species of fan palm that can survive here in winter, thats about it.
Can you identify which species of fan palms that can survive in Chicago? Thanks
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