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Old 01-05-2011, 09:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsimms3 View Post
Very impressed by far South Texas. I never get to see any pictures of if, let alone of palm trees.

Before this record cold winter and last year's absolutely brutally cold winter, NE FL was beginning to look fairly tropical itself. People were planting foxtail palms, royal palms, and even coconut palms in micro climates all over the place. For tropical looking palms in today's harsh winter reality, we are limited to Bismarck Palms (becoming really popular...we have one by our front drive), all of the various date palms, all of the fan palms, all of the sabal palms, and Queen palms (one of the most popular).

Here are some tropical foliage pictures I have taken (during the winter) in the past year. Wish I got actual plant photos before the winter of 2009-2010 before everything died. I love gardening and plants, but I never really take any pictures of them. These are taken mainly in Jacksonville city proper (inland) and a few in St. Augustine. The beaches are warmer during the winter months, and they are beaches, so they look a lot more tropical and have far more palm trees/tropical plants.





King Sago (Jacksonville area is about as far north as it can grow)


The following pictures are survivors of the worst winter in the last 50 or so years.




Not a palm, but a common tropical Florida non-native tree called a Norfolk Island Pine:




No idea what this is.


Most riverfront homes in Jacksonville are more toned down with northern/European style gardens. The following 3 homes didn't get the memo.










Happened to catch a small baby Bismarck in the ancient Springfield neighborhood.




Queen = 3rd most popular palm tree in Jacksonville.




A lone Washington Fan Palm. Looks kind of like a scene from urban LA to me.










So typically Florida with the 120 year old with those huge glasses and a track suit walking by.


Here is a medium sized Pony Palm (not a true palm, but tropical nonetheless).




















Australian Pine. Extremely invasive, Jacksonville is only warm enough in the winter for one of the three species. Australian pine has ravage coastal Florida from the Keys all the way up to Atlantic Beach, Jacksonville.


Foxtail palm barely holding on after last winter. Don't know what spurred me to take this.




Very common palm in NE and Central Florida. Senegal Island Date Palm.


More Australian Pine.


Majesty palms are also fairly popular and are relatively cold hardy (down to about 28-29 degrees for short bouts), but I don't have any pictures of them.
What neighborhoods are the 15th and 24th pictures at?
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Old 01-05-2011, 11:50 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
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15 = Klutho Park between downtown and Springfield and 24 = Riverside near 5 Points.
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Old 01-06-2011, 01:03 AM
 
Location: Orlandooooooo
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My Favorite Type OF Tree.
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsimms3 View Post
Most of the FL Peninsula is pretty inundated by non-native, invasive tropical species. I doubt TX has the same problem or at least the same extent of the problem we have here. Jax may be colder in the winter than most of the Peninsula (warmer than the Panhandle, though), but it's still warm enough in many areas to see these plants and animals drift up. Australian Pine was first planted in Cape Canaveral area just 1.5-2 hours south of Jax.

Jacksonville Beach and much of Jacksonville are zone 9B, meaning that it never gets below 25. Inland areas of Jacksonville like up by the airport or out on the westside or even down in Gainesville are zone 9A because it can get down to between 20-25 (rarely, but definitely the past two winters). There are 10a microclimates at the beach, along the parts of riverfront, and in much of the area around St. Augustine. It can be 27 in Jacksonville while it will be only 33-34 in these areas. I have a 10a microclimate in my yard on the river, and we have foxtails, fishtails, majesty palms, schefflera (2 varieties), bananas, and a rubber tree (that did freeze back the past 2 years). My mother who is a major gardener hates these plants, so I planted them away from view. I don't live at home anymore, though.

I checked the climate for SA, and Jax is a little warmer. The average low in Jax in January is 45.6 whereas it is 38.6 in SA. Just a few degrees can make a huge difference. Jax also receives an average of 50-55 inches of rain per year (about 20 more inches than SA) and 250 more hours of sunshine a year (~20 more sunny sunny days). The climate in Jax is more stereotypically humid subtropical.

Brownsville is even more subtropical, but doesn't seem humid. It's average low in January is 50.6 and has a longer period of heat than both cities, but still only receives less than 30 inches of rain a year. Brownsville has about the same climate as Cocoa Beach, 2 hours south of Jacksonville. I would guess Cocoa Beach receives more rainfall, though. Sarasota has the same climate, but north of Sarasota, St. Petersburg is actually considerably warmer. St. Petersburg, FL is almost as "tropical" as SE FL and warmer than anywhere in Texas.
South Padre Island and the southernmost barrier islands in Deep South Texas can probably hold their own with St. Petersburg. Cocoa Beach, Florida may be slightly cooler then St. Petersburg, but is about as warm as St. Petersburg due to effect from the ocean. The official airport for St. Petersburg is literally next to Gulf and is usually about 4-5 degrees warmer then inland St. Petersburg.

Here are the lows from last winter from the 3 locations:
South Padre Island, Texas: 32F
Cocoa Beach, Florida: 32F
St. Petersburg, Florida: 33F(inland locations saw close to 28F)

And here is a coconut on South Padre Island after last winter compared to St.Petersburg cocos..
Sorry about the quality..
South Padre Island, Texas
(with me for scale)

crown of the above palm


St. Petersburg, Florida
Source:South Texas Palms - PalmTalk
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rstrstx View Post
I'm surprised Jacksonville Beach has Australian pines there (it's Casuarina glauca by the way, the same one you see in South Texas and the upper 2/3 of the FL peninsula). They freeze to the ground in severe cold but can regenerate by root sprouts. One on the north side of San Antonio last winter surprisingly only froze back to the main trunk.

And yes South Texas is full of palm trees
WOW..I dream of seeing those kind of things lol...
Would love to see more pics of S. Texas...
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:15 PM
 
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Did you know that oddly Palm Trees are not native to Florida? Even though the heat can definitely support them. Henry Ford had the idea of planting various palms around the state, but they naturally refurbished throughout the state, because of the continuous heat throughout the year. He apparently loved Palm Trees and funded some program in the early 20th century for Palms.
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:17 PM
 
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with the exception of the Miami Florida southern tip area with Sable Palm Trees.
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Old 11-05-2011, 10:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancoyote View Post
Did you know that oddly Palm Trees are not native to Florida? Even though the heat can definitely support them. Henry Ford had the idea of planting various palms around the state, but they naturally refurbished throughout the state, because of the continuous heat throughout the year. He apparently loved Palm Trees and funded some program in the early 20th century for Palms.
Alot of palms are native to Florida. Alot of them aren't, but alot of them are.
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Old 03-14-2012, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melchior6 View Post
They're pretty much like a trade mark of So Cal.
I read an article in the L.A. Times a few years ago (when I lived in SoCal) that said all these really tall palms are nearing their life span. Apparently they were planted all over L.A. in the early 20th Century, but not so much anymore. The article pointed out that since they're so tall, they're kind of part of the overall "skyline" in L.A. and that will change once they all start dying.
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Old 03-14-2012, 02:48 PM
 
Location: where u wish u lived
897 posts, read 889,800 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I read an article in the L.A. Times a few years ago (when I lived in SoCal) that said all these really tall palms are nearing their life span. Apparently they were planted all over L.A. in the early 20th Century, but not so much anymore. The article pointed out that since they're so tall, they're kind of part of the overall "skyline" in L.A. and that will change once they all start dying.
You're actually right, most Palm trees that die off will be replaced with less water thirsty native oaks, hopefully this starts happening soon, I hate Palm trees, imo they're ugly and provide no shade, the only ones I like are in beverly hills
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