U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-15-2014, 07:38 PM
 
29 posts, read 52,191 times
Reputation: 44

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancoyote View Post
with the exception of the Miami Florida southern tip area with Sable Palm Trees.
They are very common here, Sabal and Saw Palms, needle palm isn't seen where i live but is actually seen further north in Florida about north of Orlando, Sabal Palmetto, Serenoa Rapens, Rostonea Regia, Needle Palm Cocothrinax and the Cherry Palm are all native to Florida.

Sabals grow here in wild stands of thousands, so do Serenoa Rapens, we also have wild Royal Palms (Rostonea Regia) not far from here on Jungle Trail in Vero.

Sabals are also common in South Carolina and it is the state tree.

We even have wild Coconuts grow behind the dunes in Brevard County where i live, when storms wash over the dunes they sprout there.

As for which state is best for growth, Hawaii is almost on the other side of the world so the reality would be Florida, Lake county south is where most do best, then there are more dry climate palms that do very poorly in Florida, Coconuts and Royals will thrive for the most part here because they like plenty of water.

Last edited by Dakotafl; 02-15-2014 at 07:50 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-09-2015, 10:25 AM
 
Location: PROUD Son of the South in Maryland
386 posts, read 547,689 times
Reputation: 189
Sorry to resurrect but had to set some records straight on Maryland. I went to OC around newyears and the sable palms there that Ive seen year in year out have stayed alive and flourishing for many years unprotected. Most people assume Maryland is colder then it actually is when in reality we are mostly a 7a-8a climate state. With western part being obviously mountainous and cold. I see all sorts of tropical plants grow unprotected in the Piedmont region and even more in coastal regions. Is it popular? Not really But I feel that is more to do with the general feeling of people thinking that Maryland is colder then it actually is.

What is common are these yucca endemic from coastal NC to the Yucatan that look like mini palm trees. They grow VERY well here in the Piedmont and I have seen many specimens go unprotected and growing 3-5ft in the 7a-7b zone. I love the way they look, but being obsessed with palm trees I wont be happy til Im living where they are endemic and not just naturalized... Oh and Ill take a few pics of the unprotected sable palms in OC next time Im out there to prove that palms do pretty well here.
Attached Thumbnails
Palm trees-20140623_135410.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2015, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
5,302 posts, read 8,030,978 times
Reputation: 2136
Aren't the Sabals just brought out to the beaches for the warm months? Besides, they are among the most cold-hardy palms out there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2015, 07:51 PM
 
Location: PROUD Son of the South in Maryland
386 posts, read 547,689 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
Aren't the Sabals just brought out to the beaches for the warm months? Besides, they are among the most cold-hardy palms out there.
Like I said I was there for new years and the sabals (not dwarfs) were unprotected and looking perfectly fine. Sure there are a few that didnt look as healthy but Id say 80% or more didnt have any yellowing or browning. What I think most refer to is Secrets who if Im not mistaken buy coconut palms and kill them each year or lease them. Which IMHO is dumb as the coconut palm can barely bear fruit north of miami let alone in a humid subtropic zone 8a.

Eitherway there are quite a few that survive the winters here unprotected and the pic I showed even grow like weeds in the piedmont region which is a solid 7a to 7b but damn close (20-30min drive) to a 8a zone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2015, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,365,608 times
Reputation: 2890
50 pages about a tree...the obsession with the palm has always been very perplexing to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2015, 08:29 PM
 
12,430 posts, read 10,363,777 times
Reputation: 17201
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
50 pages about a tree...the obsession with the palm has always been very perplexing to me.
Made me giggle

I like palm trees, but not this much. People on CD will use anything to boost their city/state/region as superior.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2015, 09:38 PM
 
14,109 posts, read 22,649,242 times
Reputation: 4202
^^^Some people love palm trees. To some people, the ability a states climate and soil has to support the growth of that tree, is viewed as a positive characteristic for that state. It is what it is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2015, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,062 posts, read 3,411,336 times
Reputation: 4298
Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
^^^Some people love palm trees. To some people, the ability a states climate and soil has to support the growth of that tree, is viewed as a positive characteristic for that state. It is what it is.
I've always been crazy about palm trees, ever since I was a little kid in Cleveland.

I lived in Florida for many years, now I live in Atlanta - where certain varieties can survive if they are well cared for, or in a little micro-climate. But they are still pretty rare here.

The bottom line is, people everywhere love palm trees including MANY places in the Northeast.

I see palm trees everywhere from the huge pots in front of the Capitol in D.C., to the courtyard at Rockefeller Center to shopping center parking lots, bar patios and private decks and balconies throughout the Northeast every single Summer.

For JerseyGirl415 (whom I like & respect, btw) to claim that people use palms to boost their city/state/region rings sort of hollow to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2015, 10:40 PM
 
12,430 posts, read 10,363,777 times
Reputation: 17201
Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
^^^Some people love palm trees. To some people, the ability a states climate and soil has to support the growth of that tree, is viewed as a positive characteristic for that state. It is what it is.
I love palm trees. They make me happy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
I've always been crazy about palm trees, ever since I was a little kid in Cleveland.

I lived in Florida for many years, now I live in Atlanta - where certain varieties can survive if they are well cared for, or in a little micro-climate. But they are still pretty rare here.

The bottom line is, people everywhere love palm trees including MANY places in the Northeast.

I see palm trees everywhere from the huge pots in front of the Capitol in D.C., to the courtyard at Rockefeller Center to shopping center parking lots, bar patios and private decks and balconies throughout the Northeast every single Summer.

For JerseyGirl415 (whom I like & respect, btw) to claim that people use palms to boost their city/state/region rings sort of hollow to me.
I guess you have not seen discussions about palm trees on city-data turn into arguments of "well my region is hot/tropical enough to support palm tree growth all year," "palm trees don't die here, they're natural here and DON'T grow naturally where you live, you just plant them each summer and then they die when it gets too cold," "palm trees look so much better in x state than in x state," "palm trees are taller, more beautiful in x state" ..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2015, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,062 posts, read 3,411,336 times
Reputation: 4298
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I love palm trees. They make me happy.



I guess you have not seen discussions about palm trees on city-data turn into arguments of "well my region is hot/tropical enough to support palm tree growth all year," "palm trees don't die here, they're natural here and DON'T grow naturally where you live, you just plant them each summer and then they die when it gets too cold," "palm trees look so much better in x state than in x state," "palm trees are taller, more beautiful in x state" ..
LOL! I have to admit I didn't see any of those. How bizarre, but not for around here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top