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Old 08-06-2008, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Midessa, Texas Home Yangzhou, Jiangsu temporarily
1,505 posts, read 3,839,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Not sure about NV and AZ....
Washingtonia filifera is native to desert oases in California, southern Nevada, and Arizona.
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Old 08-06-2008, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Midessa, Texas Home Yangzhou, Jiangsu temporarily
1,505 posts, read 3,839,156 times
Reputation: 931
Quote:
Originally Posted by illinoisboy View Post

I think they must have dones something to the second one to make it look that way.

Does anyone know what these ones are called?
Top pic: Mexican fan palm or possibly California fan palm (Washingtonia robusta or Washingtonia filifera)
Middle pic: Date palm or Canary Island date palm(Phoenix dactylifera or Phoenix canariensis)
Bottom pic: Canary Island date palm (Phoenix canariensis)
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Old 08-06-2008, 04:14 PM
 
Location: suburbia
595 posts, read 2,527,548 times
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Thanks Lucidus! The Canary Island palm has got to be my favorite. It's so BIG!

I guess the second one looks that way naturally, they didn't have to do anything to make it's leaves stand up like that. Those are pretty neat.
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Old 08-06-2008, 06:16 PM
 
8 posts, read 47,260 times
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I need to see a gentle palm tree and I won't wait too long....
I can feel that's it coming on strong...
The first cold winds of winter flapping in my clothes
Showing me the way in the direction that it blows
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Old 08-06-2008, 07:08 PM
 
Location: The NY, NJ, CT Tri-State Region
94 posts, read 124,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucidus View Post
You could give a go. Get a good cold hardy species. In the winter build a tomato cage around it and fill it with leaves, be sure to cover the crown. On warmer winter days check to make sure that there is no fungus or insect infestation.

Or you could try wrapping a pipe heater around the trunk and especially on the crown near where new fronds grow and wrap the whole thing with pipe insulation. Just be careful not to start a fire.

I grow robustas in West Texas ( zone 7b). Usually the temps are fine but every now and then we will have a bitter cold spell and I will use the pipe heater trick to protect them.

Here is a picture of mine in the snow a couple of years ago.



And here the following summer.




Last winter wasn't very cold so they look better now but I don't have any recent photos.
Wow thanks. I looked up robustas and their sister species filifera seems to be a bit more hardier (5-10F), so maybe I would have luck with that. Just brainstorming, but do you think christmas lights would help keep the plant warm? BTW I am in zone 6b, but the last 10 years have averaged about a zone 7a. The only "crazy" thing I have here are so. magnolias.
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Old 08-06-2008, 07:45 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,430,963 times
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JoeYanxfan-you would have to give a robusta or a filifera more protection than some x-mas lights, those palms would definetly be risky in NJ. The filifera from what I've heard is hardy to about 15 but Im sure can handle slightly lower than that but for a short while. They are desert palms(love sun), they dont like humidity and too much water when young can kill em. If the center spear of the palm gets moist in winter than it can die. A robusta would really be pushing the limits, it may survive a couple years with protection but I wouldnt get attached to it cause any winter could knock it out.
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Old 08-06-2008, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Floribama
14,768 posts, read 31,192,554 times
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The Sabal palms are the native ones in my area and the most popular. Saw Palmetto also grows wild here in some areas. I started my own Sabal palms from seed I collected four years, they are still not even 1ft tall. They are very slow to get started.
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Old 08-06-2008, 07:55 PM
 
Location: The NY, NJ, CT Tri-State Region
94 posts, read 124,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
JoeYanxfan-you would have to give a robusta or a filifera more protection than some x-mas lights, those palms would definetly be risky in NJ. The filifera from what I've heard is hardy to about 15 but Im sure can handle slightly lower than that but for a short while. They are desert palms(love sun), they dont like humidity and too much water when young can kill em. If the center spear of the palm gets moist in winter than it can die. A robusta would really be pushing the limits, it may survive a couple years with protection but I wouldnt get attached to it cause any winter could knock it out.
I live in CT and have only been to NJ shore (it's a blast, don't let people bad mouth it too much ) a few times. LOL I forgive you. I saw palms on Staten Island a few years ago.
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Old 08-06-2008, 07:57 PM
 
Location: The NY, NJ, CT Tri-State Region
94 posts, read 124,690 times
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What if I flipped a garbage can over it? Not the most attractive, but wouldn't it retain heat AND stay dry during the colder months?
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Old 08-06-2008, 07:58 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,430,963 times
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Southern New Mexico--


http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2406.jpg?t=1218073667 (broken link)
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2410.jpg?t=1218073692 (broken link)
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2378.jpg?t=1218073754 (broken link)


http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2367.jpg?t=1218073903 (broken link)

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2364.jpg?t=1218074006 (broken link)

Albuquerque,New Mexico---- a risky location but some palms make it
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2497.jpg?t=1218074064 (broken link)

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2508.jpg?t=1218074162 (broken link)

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2517.jpg?t=1218074186 (broken link)

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2591.jpg?t=1218074214 (broken link)

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2584.jpg?t=1218074257 (broken link)

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r90/jaredtorre/100_2925.jpg?t=1218074315 (broken link)
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