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Old 08-13-2008, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,299,772 times
Reputation: 6669

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Older, denser cities are generally more likable, at least upon first impression, because of their history, culture, and density. That's right - density promotes walking and biking, it often promotes nicer architecture (as opposed to strip malls, big box stores, and free-standing chain restaurants), and those are two things that create a "lovable" atmosphere. Older, denser cities also tend to be liberal.

Conservatives, in my experience (and I'm quite socially conservative - but don't necessarily share these views) tend to dismiss dense cities as crime-filled, communistic bastions of filth, while idealizing the "American dream" in the suburbs, sometimes calling those who criticize suburbia on aesthetic grounds "elitist". I haven't been to OKC or Virginia Beach, but I know both of them are very sprawled without a strong urban reputation (and supposedly, character). Virginia Beach I believe is one huge suburb - at least that's what I heard about - and looking at OKC on Google Earth, I see a lot of big parking lots. Those kind of things do not make for a place with character, and one likely to get a lot of love (again, on first impression - they may be in fact good places to live long-term due to cheap prices, low crime, etc.).
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Old 08-14-2008, 10:42 AM
 
769 posts, read 2,008,648 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by StillwaterTownie View Post
What good beer, especially in Minneapolis. If I'm right the state of Minnesota can be just as damned backward as Oklahoma when it comes to beer because they got 3.2% beer there, too.
Nope, MN and OK are far from being on equal terms of backwardness. I don't want to get into how wrong you are because it would start a pointless MN vs OK war.
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Old 08-14-2008, 10:47 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,439,511 times
Reputation: 1942
Quote:
Originally Posted by What! View Post
Nope, MN and OK are far from being on equal terms of backwardness. I don't want to get into how wrong you are because it would start a pointless MN vs OK war.
Sweet! We could use a new war! Scranton vs. Omaha... Chicago vs. NYC/L.A.... Houston vs. everywhere else on the planet... it's getting old!

j/k
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Old 08-14-2008, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
14,817 posts, read 13,280,963 times
Reputation: 4496
Quote:
Originally Posted by What! View Post
Nope, MN and OK are far from being on equal terms of backwardness. I don't want to get into how wrong you are because it would start a pointless MN vs OK war.
But you still can't escape from the fact that both states have 3.2% beer. Hopefully, in MN as in OK you can freely buy that weak beer in grocery and convenience stores.
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Old 08-14-2008, 10:00 PM
 
769 posts, read 2,008,648 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by StillwaterTownie View Post
But you still can't escape from the fact that both states have 3.2% beer. Hopefully, in MN as in OK you can freely buy that weak beer in grocery and convenience stores.
Sure, both have 3.2% beer, but our beer laws are nowhere near as strict as OK. And yes, in MN you can buy 3.2% beer in grocery and convenience stores 24/7.

But even if our beer laws are the same that hardly qualifies MN for being as backward as OK. Minneapolis has been trying hard to attract people from other parts of the country and the world. Minneapolis is a sanctuary city. Oklahoma and Tulsa are conservative and are not open to newcomers as much. There aren't any hardcore bars and restaurants anywhere in OK. In Minneapolis, there are many cool bars and clubs. Oklahoma has a terrible public transportation system. Minnesota keeps trying to improve our public transportation system, heck, our transportation system in general. Oklahoma is known for its crappy roads and lack of adequate public transportation. In MN, road construction is constant, seriously. I am amazed when I drive out to some distance town and see road construction.

Minneapolis has many theaters for intellectuals. Oklahoma City council members approved an investment of 19 million to build a Bass Pro Shop in the heart of Bricktown, Oklahoma City's crummy excuse for an entertainment district. Now in MN, the money would have gone toward education most likely. Or to some sort of art gallery. In OKC, they spent the money on a gun and fishing store........ They put this in the heart of their downtown.........

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...n16159371/pg_1

I could go on and on about how extremely far apart OK and MN are, but I don't think citydata has enough disk space. I just want to say, once again, MN is NOWHERE near equally backward as OK.
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Old 08-14-2008, 11:27 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,412 posts, read 7,688,732 times
Reputation: 3054
Quote:
Originally Posted by What! View Post
Sure, both have 3.2% beer, but our beer laws are nowhere near as strict as OK. And yes, in MN you can buy 3.2% beer in grocery and convenience stores 24/7.

But even if our beer laws are the same that hardly qualifies MN for being as backward as OK. Minneapolis has been trying hard to attract people from other parts of the country and the world. Minneapolis is a sanctuary city. Oklahoma and Tulsa are conservative and are not open to newcomers as much. There aren't any hardcore bars and restaurants anywhere in OK. In Minneapolis, there are many cool bars and clubs. Oklahoma has a terrible public transportation system. Minnesota keeps trying to improve our public transportation system, heck, our transportation system in general. Oklahoma is known for its crappy roads and lack of adequate public transportation. In MN, road construction is constant, seriously. I am amazed when I drive out to some distance town and see road construction.

Minneapolis has many theaters for intellectuals. Oklahoma City council members approved an investment of 19 million to build a Bass Pro Shop in the heart of Bricktown, Oklahoma City's crummy excuse for an entertainment district. Now in MN, the money would have gone toward education most likely. Or to some sort of art gallery. In OKC, they spent the money on a gun and fishing store........ They put this in the heart of their downtown.........

Bass Pro in OKC sales down from 2005 | Journal Record, The (Oklahoma City) | Find Articles at BNET

I could go on and on about how extremely far apart OK and MN are, but I don't think citydata has enough disk space. I just want to say, once again, MN is NOWHERE near equally backward as OK.
Ok, but one thing is clear: you're definitely backward even if your state is not. (Evidence: see ignorance above in post.)

Oh, have fun dabbing your eye at Phantom of the Opera. I'll be @ Bass Pro buying a new fishing rod!!!
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Old 08-15-2008, 01:08 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,418 times
Reputation: 11
Conservative cities are gross.
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Old 08-15-2008, 07:54 AM
 
769 posts, read 2,008,648 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
Ok, but one thing is clear: you're definitely backward even if your state is not. (Evidence: see ignorance above in post.)

Oh, have fun dabbing your eye at Phantom of the Opera. I'll be @ Bass Pro buying a new fishing rod!!!
LOL. I'm sorry I hurt your feelings. Sometimes the truth is a harsh mistress.
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Old 08-15-2008, 08:05 AM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,412 posts, read 7,688,732 times
Reputation: 3054
Quote:
Originally Posted by What! View Post
LOL. I'm sorry I hurt your feelings. Sometimes the truth is a harsh mistress.
ROTFLOL....yeh Bud whatever.
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Old 08-15-2008, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK, Traffic Circle Area
687 posts, read 2,108,745 times
Reputation: 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by What! View Post
Sure, both have 3.2% beer, but our beer laws are nowhere near as strict as OK. And yes, in MN you can buy 3.2% beer in grocery and convenience stores 24/7.

But even if our beer laws are the same that hardly qualifies MN for being as backward as OK. Minneapolis has been trying hard to attract people from other parts of the country and the world. Minneapolis is a sanctuary city. Oklahoma and Tulsa are conservative and are not open to newcomers as much. There aren't any hardcore bars and restaurants anywhere in OK. In Minneapolis, there are many cool bars and clubs. Oklahoma has a terrible public transportation system. Minnesota keeps trying to improve our public transportation system, heck, our transportation system in general. Oklahoma is known for its crappy roads and lack of adequate public transportation. In MN, road construction is constant, seriously. I am amazed when I drive out to some distance town and see road construction.

Minneapolis has many theaters for intellectuals. Oklahoma City council members approved an investment of 19 million to build a Bass Pro Shop in the heart of Bricktown, Oklahoma City's crummy excuse for an entertainment district. Now in MN, the money would have gone toward education most likely. Or to some sort of art gallery. In OKC, they spent the money on a gun and fishing store........ They put this in the heart of their downtown.........

Bass Pro in OKC sales down from 2005 | Journal Record, The (Oklahoma City) | Find Articles at BNET

I could go on and on about how extremely far apart OK and MN are, but I don't think citydata has enough disk space. I just want to say, once again, MN is NOWHERE near equally backward as OK.
Hmm...last time I checked, Tulsa has a world acclaimed Performing Arts Center, complete with a recent visit by, you guessed it, Phantom of the Opera. I know several people who went. We also have three world acclaimed art museums.

And as far as roads are concerned, we are probably about the same. Seem to recall something about a bridge in MSP last year....and bars/clubs. Tulsa has the Blue Dome district, Brookside, OKC has Bricktown. You obviously didn't get out a whole lot during your 'stay'.

So just how backwards are we again?
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