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Old 08-15-2008, 05:00 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
251 posts, read 634,167 times
Reputation: 71

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Very!
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Old 08-15-2008, 06:08 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,454,095 times
Reputation: 1942
Quote:
Originally Posted by NEsananto View Post
Very!
Yeah, sorry to the Okies, but there's really no comparison.

Maybe someone needs to start a thread. Minneapolis vs. OKC!!! And Tulsa!!
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Old 08-16-2008, 02:50 PM
 
769 posts, read 2,011,428 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigOkie View Post
Hmm...last time I checked, Tulsa has a world acclaimed Performing Arts Center, complete with a recent visit by, you guessed it, Phantom of the Opera. I know several people who went. We also have three world acclaimed art museums.

And as far as roads are concerned, we are probably about the same. Seem to recall something about a bridge in MSP last year....and bars/clubs. Tulsa has the Blue Dome district, Brookside, OKC has Bricktown. You obviously didn't get out a whole lot during your 'stay'.

So just how backwards are we again?
Sorry dude, that was one bridge collapsing. That was a tragedy, but, thankfully, not an every day thing. Also, yes, MN loves to clean its roads, and they don't hire immigrant labor to do it.

Plus, most people don't get much during their stay in Oklahoma. Once again, you guys aren't that open to visitors.
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Old 08-16-2008, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
14,975 posts, read 13,339,243 times
Reputation: 4579
Well, Minnesota is just too cold and covered with snow all winter for a lot of people to live in, whether they're from other states just as cool to live in or not.

Speaking of bridges, thank God, a chunk of concrete hasn't fallen off one of the many dilapidated Interstate bridges in Oklahoma and killed someone in a good while.
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Old 08-16-2008, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 6,888,070 times
Reputation: 1701
Quote:
Originally Posted by richboy View Post
Conservative cities are gross.
Hahaha.
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Old 08-16-2008, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,205 posts, read 67,351,355 times
Reputation: 15854
I can't believe someone took a jab at the perceived quality-of-life in Minneapolis by bringing up that tragic bridge collapse that affected so many people. Shame on you!
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Old 08-16-2008, 09:32 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,324,812 times
Reputation: 1589
^^ Agreed

Quote:
Originally Posted by richboy View Post
Conservative cities are gross.
you probably haven't been to any
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Old 08-16-2008, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,205 posts, read 67,351,355 times
Reputation: 15854
Getting back on-topic, the reason I don't personally like any socially conservative cities has absolutely nothing to do with the people who dwell within them. On the contrary I live in a swing state (Pennsylvania), and while I'm typically an outspoken social liberal, some of my closest friends are conservatives. When it comes down to it the places you listed don't appeal to me because I oppose urban sprawl, and as another poster upthread excellently pointed out, you merely need to consult Google Earth, Virtual Earth, Wikimapia, etc. to see the stark contrast in aesthetic desirability for very socially liberal cities replete with history and charm (Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, etc.) as opposed to typically conservative Sunbelt cities oriented around the automobile, with surface parking lots, fast-food restaurants, gas stations, and strip malls appearing on the periphery of their downtowns like dandelions.

I'd much rather depart the "T" at the Boston Commons station and walk the Freedom Trail around Beantown than I would take a stroll through "historic" Downtown Oklahoma City, Virginia Beach, or Phoenix. I made a comment in the past inquiring as to why Phoenix, our nation's fifth-largest city, has such an embarrassingly small downtown, and I was met with mostly shrugged shoulders. Why? The people living on the cul-de-sacs of North Scottsdale couldn't care less about Downtown Phoenix and feel no identity towards their host city. Contrariwise when I have friends visiting my suburban homestead from out of the area, I make sure to showcase all that Downtown Scranton has to offer in order to impress them with our historic brick facades, Steamtown, "The Office", etc. Somehow I don't get the feeling that people living in Virginia Beach or Tulsa show off their "downtown" to visitors as a hot spot. I'd garner a bet that there's more culture and history embedded within merely one block of Alexandria, Virginia, for example, than in several neighborhoods of Phoenix, Cary, Tulsa, or Wichita.

Ordinarily I'd give these cities a pass, since they've obviously had less time to mature and acclimate to their newfound success as America's next great cities; however, my confidence in them EVER becoming decent places to live slips when I see that sprawling low-rise lifestyle centers and their accompanying chains (Bass Pro Shop? UGH!) are being encouraged to come downtown to devour prime real estate that may otherwise be opportune for mixed-use projects such as ground-level independent stores and restaurants with loft-style housing overhead. What's next? A cul-de-sac in the middle of Phoenix? (Or do they already have that?)
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Old 08-16-2008, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,428,775 times
Reputation: 13010
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Colorado Springs, CO
Salt Lake City, UT
Oklahoma City, OK
Tulsa, OK
Little Rock, AR
Virginia Beach, VA
Wichita, KS

The one thing all these cities have in common is they are all known for being conservative cities. You never see anybody mention these places unless its something negative yet the Seattles and Austins get nothing but praise. All of these cities have a lot to offer, yet get no respect especially on this forum. Why is this? Do conservatives really bother people so much they can't look beyond their elitism into what these cities really offer, or are these places just that bad?

P.S. I probably left some cities off this list that should be included. Feel free to add some.
Another thing this cities have in common is that they are all relatively small, for big cities. If you quickly scan the names of the cities, yes you know what and where they are, but what exactly is there?

Colorado Springs: Pikes Peak, Garden of the Gods, Church, Military
Salt Lake City: Utah Jazz, Mountains, Mormons
Oklahoma City: Bombing Memorial, uh, tornadoes?
Tulsa: ?, The Colorado Rockies AA baseball team
Little Rock: ? again, Arkansas State Capitol, a river?
Virginia Beach: Military, a beach, case study of suburban sprawl
Wichita: Planes.......planes........planes.....???

This is all that came off the top of my head when thinking of these places, but I've only been to the first two. The fact that many people probably can't equate name with anything known, special or popular is the reason why these places don't get much love.

Conservatives, for the most part tend to live in cities like those, or in suburbs of major cities, small towns, or in rural areas. Most big cities are liberal, even if they are in red counties or states. Many conservatives don't live in cities, which is why I think their "cities" don't get much love to begin with, because they are mostly suburbs, or cities designed with a suburban template, which IMO isn't enough to garner "love", because for the most part they are designed to be functional, not interesting.
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Old 08-16-2008, 10:31 PM
 
Location: RVA
2,418 posts, read 4,196,898 times
Reputation: 1195
Another reason is that most cities are populated by forward-thinking individuals who don't care about things like who marries whom. Life would be ten times more interesting without social conservatives. I guess it's just a matter of time.

Salt Lake City is the creepiest place I've ever been.
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