U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which city is better?
St. Louis, MO 79 67.52%
Indianapolis, IN 38 32.48%
Voters: 117. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-21-2011, 02:36 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,659,464 times
Reputation: 1385

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by msamhunter View Post
It's pretty simple, name ONE style of housing St. Louis has that Indianapolis does not? That should be pretty simple correct? And again, no major us city has anything any other major us city doesn't have. Believe it or not, cities are like sport franchises in the same sports, it's copycat, again aloof thinking that city A has this to offer that city B does not.

Indianapolis and Unigov was formed in 1967 and even before unigov, Indy still took up more space then St. Louis so what's your point? Indianapolis was designed to be a state capital, as that's the ONLY reason Indianapolis was formed to get a state capital more centrally located in the state than Corydon. St. Louis wasn't designed to be a large city, it's an area people flocked to that became a large city, it was designed to be a city based off of the population trends and times of the era. And even if you went back to the old city limits, Indianapolis would still have more people than St. Louis.

Sports, St. Louis has Hockey, Baseball and Football. Baseball and Hockey are now second tier behind basketball and Football. Indy has Football and Basketball. Unfortunately professional sports isn't what just makes a sports town, hence the term SPORTS in sports town. Indianapolis has St. Louis beat, Amateur sports, of course no contest, collegiate sports, again Indianapolis, the greatest spectacle in racing, the Indianapolis 500 which I stated is the largest single day attended event on the planet, and the Brickyard 400 which is the second largest single day attended event. You do realize those two events alone will have more people than St. Louis proper has people and that's just inside the track, that doesn't count the thousands outside the track. On the professional level, Indy doesn't have professional baseball and hockey so sure, St. Louis would be better as Indy only has minor league. Football, as of today, the Colts are better and since St. Louis doesn't have NBA, the Pacers win out no matter how bad they suck so it's a wash for professional sports.
Says the Indy fan whose town doesn't have baseball and hockey. Sorry, but MLB beats the NBA in just about every way. The NBA is nothing more than 6 months of boredom leading up to crowning whatever glamour franchise star player's turn it is to win it this year.

That being said, I'll take Indy. At least it's closer to the eastern cities. St. Louis is far too isolated. If it's just city vs. city though, I'd go with St. Louis. It just has far more of what makes a city big league.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-21-2011, 03:13 PM
 
3,008 posts, read 4,173,692 times
Reputation: 1524
Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralCarmel View Post
The bolded part could not be further from the truth. I live here and I'll be an advocate for Indy but I'm not going to sit here and lie.
Carmel? Didn't know Hamilton County residents ventured south of 56th St especially now that Carmel has grown and built up as much as it has. A lot that I knew didn't go south of 71st but I digress. All the of same style houses can be found in Lockerbie, Woodruff, Irvington, Cottage Home, Fountain Square, Fletcher Place, and some over in Ransom Place and the Old North Side. With the exception of Woodruff which has always been quiet and safe even though everything else around it wasn't for the most part were in "undesirable" locations in and around downtown, only through gentrification has these areas started coming back to life but until then once they fell into despair no one would dare venture there as if these areas were the meadows or haughville.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Location: East Side, Indianapolis
191 posts, read 152,173 times
Reputation: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by msamhunter View Post
Carmel? Didn't know Hamilton County residents ventured south of 56th St especially now that Carmel has grown and built up as much as it has. A lot that I knew didn't go south of 71st but I digress. All the of same style houses can be found in Lockerbie, Woodruff, Irvington, Cottage Home, Fountain Square, Fletcher Place, and some over in Ransom Place and the Old North Side. With the exception of Woodruff which has always been quiet and safe even though everything else around it wasn't for the most part were in "undesirable" locations in and around downtown, only through gentrification has these areas started coming back to life but until then once they fell into despair no one would dare venture there as if these areas were the meadows or haughville.
Get a clue. You're stereotyping is getting old very quickly.

All of those are great neighborhoods and a few of them do have some good residential architecture, but you're displaying your ignorance of much older cities like St Louis and Cincinnati if you think that what we have to offer can compare.

But don't think for a minute that it makes those older cities universally superior. They're just different, that's all. At the end of the day I wouldn't trade Indy for St Louis, but I wouldn't blame anyone for feeling the opposite way either.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 03:30 PM
 
3,008 posts, read 4,173,692 times
Reputation: 1524
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Says the Indy fan whose town doesn't have baseball and hockey. Sorry, but MLB beats the NBA in just about every way. The NBA is nothing more than 6 months of boredom leading up to crowning whatever glamour franchise star player's turn it is to win it this year.

That being said, I'll take Indy. At least it's closer to the eastern cities. St. Louis is far too isolated. If it's just city vs. city though, I'd go with St. Louis. It just has far more of what makes a city big league.
I personally can't stand the NBA but it is more watched than MLB which if you goto a MLB game you can have a great time, on TV different story. I prefer high school basketball, then college.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 04:02 PM
 
Location: The City of Shoes and Booze
136 posts, read 213,560 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by msamhunter View Post
It's pretty simple, name ONE style of housing St. Louis has that Indianapolis does not? That should be pretty simple correct?

St. Louis wasn't designed to be a large city, it's an area people flocked to that became a large city, it was designed to be a city based off of the population trends and times of the era.
I don't think Indy has Flounder Homes or Second Empire Homes. If you do please correct me because I have never been to Indy.

St. Louis was designed to be a large city it was built for a million people and the founding fathers Chouteau and Laclede said this land is going to have the greatest city in the world built here, but did it happen...no. St. Louis wasn't some podunk cow town that so happen to be a top ten city for 110 years (1850-1960) by accident.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 05:25 PM
 
3,008 posts, read 4,173,692 times
Reputation: 1524
Quote:
Originally Posted by masterwood89 View Post
I don't think Indy has Flounder Homes or Second Empire Homes. If you do please correct me because I have never been to Indy.

St. Louis was designed to be a large city it was built for a million people and the founding fathers Chouteau and Laclede said this land is going to have the greatest city in the world built here, but did it happen...no. St. Louis wasn't some podunk cow town that so happen to be a top ten city for 110 years (1850-1960) by accident.
There are only a few second empires left on the old north side and out in irvington. Only flounder I can think of is in Lockerbie. It's it's not a flounder per designation is awefully close with the long windowless side.

Indianapolis wasn't designed to be some podunk cow town either as it was built to be a state capital and the city grid designed to handle a large population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 05:41 PM
 
Location: The City of Shoes and Booze
136 posts, read 213,560 times
Reputation: 84
Can you give a link on googlemaps if you know where that flounder is in Lockerbie, and if is indeed a flounder I am shocked as I have only seen flounders in three cities.

I hope you didn't think that I was calling Indy a cow town it's just you said St. Louis wasn't designed to be large I was just explaining that the whole point of the founders of St. Louis building the city at the confluence of two major rivers was that they intended St. Louis to be large by design not by population trends.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,844,196 times
Reputation: 619
As far as the walkability, saying that Indy is more walkable is interesting, because I found St. Louis to be far more walkable.

And can you please post links to the Indy 500 being the largest single sporting event by attendance on the planet? I am from Anderson, and everyone made a big deal out of it then, and we always made sure we were in Indy when it was in town, but it never seemed like it would take a world record or anything like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,269 posts, read 13,562,821 times
Reputation: 5828
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
And can you please post links to the Indy 500 being the largest single sporting event by attendance on the planet? I am from Anderson, and everyone made a big deal out of it then, and we always made sure we were in Indy when it was in town, but it never seemed like it would take a world record or anything like that.
The attendance at IMS for the Indy 500 is around 400,000. If you know of a bigger single day event, feel free to post it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2011, 03:22 PM
 
Location: San Diego
1,760 posts, read 2,942,863 times
Reputation: 1230
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Says the Indy fan whose town doesn't have baseball and hockey. Sorry, but MLB beats the NBA in just about every way. The NBA is nothing more than 6 months of boredom leading up to crowning whatever glamour franchise star player's turn it is to win it this year.
I could honestly say the exact same thing about MLB, but it's just a different opinion. NBA at least has action and people moving around constantly, while half of a baseball game is a bunch of people standing there doing nothing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top