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View Poll Results: Which city is better?
St. Louis, MO 79 67.52%
Indianapolis, IN 38 32.48%
Voters: 117. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-06-2011, 12:55 AM
 
Location: San Diego
1,762 posts, read 3,050,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Bottom line, Greater St. Louis is safer than the Indianapolis metro area. So when people are comparing the two places, they should take that into account, not just the cities themselves. Most people take the metro area as a whole when dealing with anything, but when dealing with crime stats, they only wanna look at the city limits for some reason. Memphis metro is ranked 2nd most dangerous. To me, that's far less appealing than seeing that St. Louis city is ranked #1 in crime but the metro as a whole is ranked 103rd. I'll take the safer metro. In both Memphis & St. Louis, a good amount of my time is not spent within the city limits, but in other parts of the metro. So why wouldn't I take the safer metro area?
The real point is that crime statistics really don't matter until you boil them down to specific neighborhoods. Indianapolis may be considered to have a high crime rate, but if you wanted to live in Nora, Downtown, Broad Ripple, or near the Fashion Mall, the crime rate would be very low. When you base it on metro area statistics, the numbers are skewed even more. Just because there may be more crime overall in the entire MSA doesn't mean that Carmel and Zionsville aren't safer than all of the suburbs in St. Louis (and I'm not saying they are).
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Old 07-06-2011, 05:34 AM
 
3,008 posts, read 4,325,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Bottom line, Greater St. Louis is safer than the Indianapolis metro area. So when people are comparing the two places, they should take that into account, not just the cities themselves. Most people take the metro area as a whole when dealing with anything, but when dealing with crime stats, they only wanna look at the city limits for some reason. Memphis metro is ranked 2nd most dangerous. To me, that's far less appealing than seeing that St. Louis city is ranked #1 in crime but the metro as a whole is ranked 103rd. I'll take the safer metro. In both Memphis & St. Louis, a good amount of my time is not spent within the city limits, but in other parts of the metro. So why wouldn't I take the safer metro area?
Actually most people tend to take the city as a whole and base things with regards to that particular city such as QOL, COL, etc. No one thinks about moving to Atlanta and base it off of Cobb County. No one moves to Chicago and base their decision off of Cicero. When a person moves to Atlanta, Dallas, Indy, St. Louis guess what, they look at THE CITY. Do you think people base moving to Indianapolis on Brown County? Hendricks County? Heck no, they base it off of Indianapolis the city. They may choose to live elsewhere in the metro but their decision to move someplace is solely based on that major city. You know why, simple a suburb is a suburb, no matter where you go any any major area, a suburb is a suburb and they are a dime a dozen. A suburb might try to compete for tourist dollars within the media market of their primary city, BUT will not do a national or regional campaign on their own, it's always the primary city. They don't say come to the St. Louis metro area, it's Come to St. Louis
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Old 07-06-2011, 06:03 AM
 
976 posts, read 1,878,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msamhunter View Post
Actually most people tend to take the city as a whole and base things with regards to that particular city such as QOL, COL, etc. No one thinks about moving to Atlanta and base it off of Cobb County. No one moves to Chicago and base their decision off of Cicero. When a person moves to Atlanta, Dallas, Indy, St. Louis guess what, they look at THE CITY. Do you think people base moving to Indianapolis on Brown County? Hendricks County? Heck no, they base it off of Indianapolis the city. They may choose to live elsewhere in the metro but their decision to move someplace is solely based on that major city. You know why, simple a suburb is a suburb, no matter where you go any any major area, a suburb is a suburb and they are a dime a dozen. A suburb might try to compete for tourist dollars within the media market of their primary city, BUT will not do a national or regional campaign on their own, it's always the primary city. They don't say come to the St. Louis metro area, it's Come to St. Louis
i take issue with your assertions. people these days look at metro areas, not just central cities. that's what is used to calculate gdp, market size, importance, etc. and apparently you don't realize that st. louis county is not a "suburb" but rather, an adjacent suburban county. st. louis city is independent and unlike 99% of major cities in the usa, it is not part of any county. conversely, indianapolis annexed almost all of its suburban county to boost its numbers. what you have as a result is a primarily suburban "city" that lacks urban character. that may work on paper, but it's deceiving. for instance, indianapolis is a larger "city" than boston, washington, dc, seattle and miami. does anyone really believe that indy is bigger than these cities? no. i promise you, no. city boundaries are merely political designations that mean little in today's metropolitan society.
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Old 07-06-2011, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,015,870 times
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I've mentioned this before, but I find it funny how the city dwelling denizens places like St. Louis will always discount and turn their noses at their suburban dwelling neighbors.

Until they need their population numbers to bolster their claims that their city is actually bigger than it really is.
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:00 AM
 
976 posts, read 1,878,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
I've mentioned this before, but I find it funny how the city dwelling denizens places like St. Louis will always discount and turn their noses at their suburban dwelling neighbors.

Until they need their population numbers to bolster their claims that their city is actually bigger than it really is.
this coming from someone who purports to hate everything about st. louis, yet is still bizarrely addicted to threads relating to the city. your infatuation with a city you "hate" is really cute. you can't seem to get enough!
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,015,870 times
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Open general forum.

And since I still have a house in the St. Louis Area, I still have an interest there
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,340 posts, read 14,093,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
I've mentioned this before, but I find it funny how the city dwelling denizens places like St. Louis will always discount and turn their noses at their suburban dwelling neighbors.

Until they need their population numbers to bolster their claims that their city is actually bigger than it really is.
It's funny because its true.
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Old 07-06-2011, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,711,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxic Toast View Post
St. Louis has it's own style of pizza. You can't find it in Indianapolis. I don't care much for the STL style of pizza you find at Imo's, though I do like the standard thin crust pizzas you can find around Indianapolis.

STL is also know for toasted ravioli. It is incredible, I wish that was more available in Indianapolis. If you want to try it "homemade," you can get a box of frozen toasted ravioli from Super Target, I highly recommend it.

Indianapolis is known for its Pork Tenderloin.
Not to mention gooey butter cake, and at least 1/2 a dozen other dishes I can think of.
Also, the local wine scene cannot even be compared, as STL has far more within a 60 mile radius.
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Old 07-06-2011, 01:04 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,997,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
I've mentioned this before, but I find it funny how the city dwelling denizens places like St. Louis will always discount and turn their noses at their suburban dwelling neighbors.

Until they need their population numbers to bolster their claims that their city is actually bigger than it really is.
Even the most hardcore St. Louis urbanites on the STL forum usually have nice things to say about suburbs like Clayton, University City, Webster Groves, Kirkwood, and St. Charles (main street) Even the further out suburbs like Chesterfield & Wildwood have good qualities (beautiful natural setting) St. Louis city & county are a complete package to me. As for St. Charles County, I could take it or leave it. To me, it makes perfect sense to compare St. Louis city+county to Indianapolis because it still has a higher population density than Indy.
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Old 07-06-2011, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,340 posts, read 14,093,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
Not to mention gooey butter cake, and at least 1/2 a dozen other dishes I can think of.
Also, the local wine scene cannot even be compared, as STL has far more within a 60 mile radius.
I had that gooey cake at Park Ave Coffee, I think in Lafayette Square. It was real good, I didn't know that was an STL thing.
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