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Old 04-04-2010, 09:55 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
4,085 posts, read 7,449,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Oh, so we're becoming a warehouse for poor folks from Jersey. I get it.
I never said that - although that may be part of what NC is becoming, in reality.

Whether it's "poor folks" or just middle-income to lower-income people who want to get more house/property for their money, the fact is that yes, you are getting the people who leave NJ because they can't get that particular thing here but they can get it there. That is essentially all NC has to offer that's better. For some, maybe even for most, the weather is better in NC, but that's a personal decision; there are people, albeit not many, who prefer colder weather than even NJ.

So if you see NC as a warehouse for the poor of NJ who flee to NC like refugees (indeed, these same people use words like "escape" and "flee" when they talk about their leaving NJ) then I believe you, since you live there. But all I was saying is that the people who leave NJ for NC do so for the difference in cost of living, whether they're poor, middle-class, or very cheap upper-class people. The impetus for a move from NJ to NC is housing cost, that's really it.
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Old 04-04-2010, 10:06 PM
 
1,605 posts, read 3,315,671 times
Reputation: 595
Something I wanted to point out, NJ has mountains, maybe not quite as high as NC, but they're mountains none the less. Also, the cost of living in NJ varies wildly from county to county.
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Old 04-04-2010, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
315 posts, read 538,578 times
Reputation: 331
I see where you are coming from, but also people move to certain areas for luxury reasons also. I know people who left LA to live in the country in Georgia. It all depends on where that person wants to live too, not just on income and what they can afford. We have plenty of millionaires and billionaires in the US who live in the middle of nowhere. They could easily choose to live in a major city or a high populated state, but they decided on elsewhere.
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Old 04-04-2010, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 14,605,230 times
Reputation: 4457
Charlotte is trying very hard to be more progressive, modern, and urban, but the lingering NASCAR and Bible Belt culture is holding it back.
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Old 04-04-2010, 10:55 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,850,743 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Charlotte is trying very hard to be more progressive, modern, and urban, but the lingering NASCAR and Bible Belt culture is holding it back.
It's not at all. A city can be progressive, modern, and urban and yet still remain true to its roots and not try to disown them. We simply have those in place as two elements among many that contribute to our emerging "big city" identity. If some people are uncomfortable with or have inaccurate perceptions about those elements, that's their problem.
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Old 04-05-2010, 12:21 AM
 
Location: DC/Brooklyn, NY/Miami, FL
1,179 posts, read 2,411,266 times
Reputation: 391
New Jersey (Jersey City or Hoboken in particular, NC is too slow and country-fied
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Old 04-05-2010, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Historic Downtown Jersey City
2,705 posts, read 7,099,938 times
Reputation: 1191
Quote:
Originally Posted by toomuchtoolong View Post
People willing to pay more has no connection with the desirability of NJ. People are here for work. Actually the pay/cost of living ratio is much better in some other states. The professionals (doctors,lawyers,etc) know they could make a good living and their money would go further living in a lower cost of living state. Maybe people pay more to live here because they don't know the true value of money. And also you might try not being so snobbish and opinionated and realize that not everyone makes those "higher salaries" here.
Actually, that is the ONLY objective way to judge an area's desirability ... what people are WILLING to pay to live there. Living in NC may be more desirable for Joe Smith, and living in NJ may be more desirable for Jill Schmoe, but the only objective way to identify an area's overall, mass desirability is by what people are willing to pay to live there.

And in that regards, NJ blows NC out of the water. It's like the Yankees versus a little league team.
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Old 04-05-2010, 06:45 AM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
805 posts, read 1,191,183 times
Reputation: 724
Quote:
Originally Posted by BergenCountyJohnny View Post
I never said that - although that may be part of what NC is becoming, in reality.

Whether it's "poor folks" or just middle-income to lower-income people who want to get more house/property for their money, the fact is that yes, you are getting the people who leave NJ because they can't get that particular thing here but they can get it there. That is essentially all NC has to offer that's better. For some, maybe even for most, the weather is better in NC, but that's a personal decision; there are people, albeit not many, who prefer colder weather than even NJ.

So if you see NC as a warehouse for the poor of NJ who flee to NC like refugees (indeed, these same people use words like "escape" and "flee" when they talk about their leaving NJ) then I believe you, since you live there. But all I was saying is that the people who leave NJ for NC do so for the difference in cost of living, whether they're poor, middle-class, or very cheap upper-class people. The impetus for a move from NJ to NC is housing cost, that's really it.
Also Pennsylvania (mainly eastern) is getting a good number of ex-New Jersey residents as well, especially Pike County and the Allentown area.

Some see it as a blessing (population growth) and as a curse (attracting gangs and more violence, as some residents say).

I know a few New Jersey retirees here in the Pittsburgh region and they said cost of living was why they left.
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Old 04-05-2010, 08:11 AM
 
4,675 posts, read 7,810,078 times
Reputation: 1230
Quote:
Originally Posted by BergenCountyJohnny View Post
NJ is obviously the more desirable state for most people. The fact that people choose, of their own free wills, to pay much more to live in NJ makes that clear. The benefits of living in NJ include a higher salary to help offset the higher cost of living. People who are wise with their money can make the most of living here to further offset the higher cost of living.

NC is a great state with a lot to offer, but compared to NJ, NC just isn't as desirable a state for most people to choose.
As someone said earlier, it is not that obvious that NJ is the more desirable state. NC has recently passed up NJ when it comes to population. NC is not a backwoods, country-fied area as some suppose, even though there some areas like that as in NJ as well, and you have many professionals who make excess salaries that live comfortably here. So it is not like everybody in NC is lower-middle and below class income. I'm sure that is not what you meant, but your post could be interpreted that way.
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Old 04-05-2010, 08:13 AM
 
4,675 posts, read 7,810,078 times
Reputation: 1230
Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyc_37 View Post
Actually, that is the ONLY objective way to judge an area's desirability ... what people are WILLING to pay to live there. Living in NC may be more desirable for Joe Smith, and living in NJ may be more desirable for Jill Schmoe, but the only objective way to identify an area's overall, mass desirability is by what people are willing to pay to live there.

And in that regards, NJ blows NC out of the water. It's like the Yankees versus a little league team.
I'm not sure what you mean. How does NJ blow NC out of the water? What means are you using to quantify your answer?
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