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View Poll Results: Which has the best upscale shopping in Texas?
Dallas 37 61.67%
Houston 23 38.33%
Voters: 60. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-26-2010, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
I agree with this, but I feel Dallasites are behind in Fashion. They offer more upscale stores, but it's "Fashion Capital" title isn't represented well out on the streets. The average person in Houston dress better (Imo) than the average person in Dallas.
Well that's why I said that there is a difference in being fashionable and a city being a fashion capital. I do agree with Lanative10 that Houston's black population is alot more fashionable than Dallas' black population. You can see it in indmix. But I will take his word for it when it comes to Whites, Asians, and maybe Hispanics. I say maybe because I don't think there is a huge difference.

 
Old 05-26-2010, 10:48 AM
 
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Besides the leadership of the late Stanley and Lawrence Marcus (still living), Dallas is known for fashion also because of its wholesale apparel markets - the Dallas Market Center was created by the late Trammell Crow, who at one time was the largest landlord in the world.

Dallas Market Center

Fashion Industry Gallery | The Boutique Wholesale Fashion Venue in Dallas, Texas

I'm proud to say that Lawrence Marcus and Trammell Crow went to my high school, Woodrow Wilson, in the Lakewood area. Stanley Marcus was too old to go there and attended Forest Ave. (now Madison) High. Aaron Spelling, who went on to shape a lot fashion with his many TV and movie productions, also went there (and was a cheerleader at SMU).
 
Old 05-26-2010, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 29,784,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Well that's why I said that there is a difference in being fashionable and a city being a fashion capital. I do agree with Lanative10 that Houston's black population is alot more fashionable than Dallas' black population. You can see it in indmix. But I will take his word for it when it comes to Whites, Asians, and maybe Hispanics. I say maybe because I don't think there is a huge difference.
I agree. I just don't see a significant difference to where I can say the people of Houston/Dallas are more fashionable.
 
Old 05-26-2010, 04:42 PM
 
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Kim Dawson: Former model helped put Dallas on the runway | News for Dallas, Texas | Dallas Morning News | Breaking News for Dallas-Fort Worth | Dallas Morning News

"With her business savvy, people skills and knack for identifying talent, she propelled the Kim Dawson Agency into an internationally recognized, multimillion-dollar enterprise that mirrored Dallas' development as a fashion destination"
 
Old 05-26-2010, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAnative10 View Post
Sorry if this comes across the wrong way, but I feel the statement above is only true for black people who do seem to dress better in Houston. In Dallas, white people, Hispanic, and Asians seem to dress better. The reason I include Asians in that statement is that Koreans and Japanese tend to dress alot better than the other Asian cultures and there are alot more of those in Dallas than Houston.
The Japanese population in D/FW & Houston is distributed evenly; about 3,000 in each metro...hardly anything to write home about. People in LA, SF, & Seattle would laugh.

Yes, Dallas has the larger Korean, Thai, Cambodian, & Laotian populations. Houston has a much larger Vietnamese, Chinese, & Filipino presence.

That said, Japanese Americans don't tend to bring their fashion sense with them when they come here as most aren't from Tokyo, the fashion capital of Japan & the Far East.

Dallas is however the fashion center of the South Central United States. Nothing more, nothing less. Being home to Neiman's is really the only reason for this.

Last edited by Metro Matt; 05-26-2010 at 06:39 PM..
 
Old 05-26-2010, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R1070 View Post
I dont understand this northern snobbery toward malls. Miami, LA, Phoenix, Houston, Dallas, Las Vegas, Atlanta all have major shopping malls and one thing in common is hot weather. When it is over 100 degrees in the southwest no one wants to be outside. Heck I consider Washington DC a northern city and it even has its main shopping areas in malls. Who cares if its in a mall or not? A mall is actually considered more density because you can fit more stores, restaurants and amenities into a smaller space. I thought density is what got northerners rocks off? I dont care if its in a mall or on a street upscale is upscale. I think its just an excuse for people to crack on the south and try to make it look inferior but the funny thing is every city across this country has malls. Lucky for the north the whole urban lifestyle is back in style because for all of those decades prior it was considered out dated and major city centers were in decline and sunbelt cities were growing with the latest trends and to this day they are too because there is a lot of urban infill going into these cities. So please get over the pretentiousness, the more everyone screams "OMG its a mall" the less we care. There is no argument there, different regions, different climates, different styles.
Nice little rant and tired excuse bringing up the weather. I see people in Chicago walking on Michigan Avenue in the middle of December when it's 4 degrees outside in the middle of the afternoon. So I don't care to hear that it's so hot. In the end, it's still a mall and I'm far from a northern snob as I am not even from the north. A giant building surrounded by a sea of parking. How nice. They still suck and I laugh at the notion that just because they are in one building it somehow equals density. And most people from DC will tell you that one of the best shopping experiences in the area is in Georgetown on M Street and lower Wisconsin Avenue or one of the many streetfront stores in downtown.
 
Old 05-26-2010, 08:42 PM
 
Location: America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Nice little rant and tired excuse bringing up the weather. I see people in Chicago walking on Michigan Avenue in the middle of December when it's 4 degrees outside in the middle of the afternoon. So I don't care to hear that it's so hot. In the end, it's still a mall and I'm far from a northern snob as I am not even from the north. A giant building surrounded by a sea of parking. How nice. They still suck and I laugh at the notion that just because they are in one building it somehow equals density. And most people from DC will tell you that one of the best shopping experiences in the area is in Georgetown on M Street and lower Wisconsin Avenue or one of the many streetfront stores in downtown.
but you do know that cities like new york and chicago do have malls, right? of course, they aren't surrounded by parking lots but a MUCH more urban environment. the shops at columbus circle (manhattan) seems awesome. in fact, why don't sunbelt cities just build big malls in their downtowns
 
Old 05-26-2010, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Houston
182 posts, read 272,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
but you do know that cities like new york and chicago do have malls, right? of course, they aren't surrounded by parking lots but a MUCH more urban environment. the shops at columbus circle (manhattan) seems awesome. in fact, why don't sunbelt cities just build big malls in their downtowns
Big indoor malls aren't being built anymore, every development is being built as a lifestyle center that of course tries to imitate a "downtown" and is located nowhere near a real CBD... LOL
 
Old 05-26-2010, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
but you do know that cities like new york and chicago do have malls, right? of course, they aren't surrounded by parking lots but a MUCH more urban environment. the shops at columbus circle (manhattan) seems awesome. in fact, why don't sunbelt cities just build big malls in their downtowns
My beef is usually the suburban style malls that cater to the car and surrounded by parking. Downtown Houston actually has a mall and it's the Pavilions and I have no problem with that development. In fact, i think Houston is the only city that has built basically a mall in it's downtown in Texas.
 
Old 05-26-2010, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Austin/Houston, TX
128 posts, read 229,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missionhome View Post
That would make them closer to places like South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa, CA or King of Prussia Mall in suburban Philadelphia.
I've been to the Houston Galleria and King of Prussia Mall and they have very different feels to them, but you are correct in that it is a similar concept.


As far as which of these cities wins, I have to give it to Houston. The Houston Galleria has the 4th-highest number of stores of any shopping center in the US with some nice anchors like Nordstrom, Neiman Marcus and Saks Fifth Avenue. Dallas probably has more malls, but this is about upscale over convenient shopping, so I have to give Houston the edge.

Neither city is known for shopping, but a lot of people don't realize how good a lot of things are in either city, leading to a lot of perceived "hype" on here when anyone wants to talk about them.
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