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Old 01-31-2012, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,093,488 times
Reputation: 688

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Hilliest:

San Fran
Seattle
Duluth, MN had some incredibly steep hills
Pittsburgh
Gatlinburg, TN

Flattest:

Chicago
Miami
Phoenix
Kansas City
Columbus
Columbus is hillier than Chicago, Miami, Phoenix, Indianapolis, New Orleans, for sure and maybe Kansas City (haven't been enough)

It is not the least hilly, but the center of the city (downtown) is located where the region really faltens out. Thus most visitors would never be in the NE, NW, and East side areas with more elevation changes.

Why? It technically is a the end of the "Appalachian plateau" The east, NE and NW sides has ravines and very small elevation changes in many subdivisions, neighborhoods (like Clintonville, Worthington, some of Dublin). The eastern side of the metro is hilly.

Yet, this is in stark contrast to the west side which is totally flat. Columbus is literally straddling the end of the Appalachian Plateau and the plains heading toward Indiana. All these pics were taken from Rhodes Tower Downtown

http://urbanohio.com/CentralOhio/Col...rs/Rhodes1.JPG

Leveque Tower looking SW
http://urbanohio.com/CentralOhio/Col...Downtown32.JPG

http://urbanohio.com/CentralOhio/Col...illage/GV9.JPG

Columbus Neighborhoods like this are examples of the very small, hilly, ravine like areas (much of the central north side and NW side). Areas further east in the metro are more hilly.

http://static3.bareka.com/photos/medium/18739382.jpg

http://static2.bareka.com/photos/medium/18739417.jpg

http://static2.bareka.com/photos/medium/18739445.jpg

what these areas look like from far away, literally small hills
http://urbanohio.com/CentralOhio/Col...Downtown35.JPG

http://urbanohio.com/CentralOhio/Col...East/OTE65.JPG

Last edited by JMT; 09-08-2012 at 10:56 AM..
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Old 01-31-2012, 09:17 PM
 
515 posts, read 821,268 times
Reputation: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpipkins View Post
You must travel to Pittsburgh. The Hills are never ending and we have some of the steepest streets anywhere.
I have traveled to Pittsburgh and its quite hilly. However, I still think San Francisco is hillier - partly because they were determined to overlay an orthogonal grid over extremely hilly terrain.
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Old 01-31-2012, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Reading PA
172 posts, read 192,972 times
Reputation: 217
HILLY
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
LA
Seattle

FLATTEST
Houston
OK city
Las Vegas
Miami
Atlantic City
Long Beach
San Jose
Phoenix
San Antonio
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Old 01-31-2012, 09:36 PM
 
515 posts, read 821,268 times
Reputation: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by chocisful View Post
HILLY
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
LA
Seattle

FLATTEST
Houston
OK city
Las Vegas
Miami
Atlantic City
Long Beach
San Jose
Phoenix

San Antonio
San Jose and Phoenix aren't particularly hilly, but I wouldn't list them among the flattest. For example, East San Jose is pretty hilly, its right and the foot of some pretty significant hills. This LINK demonstrates what I'm talking about in San Jose. There are parts of Phoenix that are similar (although not as green!)
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Old 01-31-2012, 10:47 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,484,897 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by chocisful View Post
HILLY
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
LA
Seattle

FLATTEST
Houston
OK city
Las Vegas
Miami
Atlantic City
Long Beach
San Jose
Phoenix
San Antonio
San Antonio may not be one of the hilliest, but it's far from one of the flattest. Someone lied to you.

http://stonewallestatestx.com/images...n/downtown.jpg

Last edited by JMT; 09-08-2012 at 10:57 AM..
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Old 02-01-2012, 01:26 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,311 posts, read 4,131,220 times
Reputation: 1429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
San Antonio may not be one of the hilliest, but it's far from one of the flattest. Someone lied to you.
Yeah, considering part of the area is in the "Texas Hill Country", I'd say you have a point.
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Old 02-01-2012, 08:51 PM
 
4,360 posts, read 4,226,113 times
Reputation: 3335
Quote:
Originally Posted by portlanderinOC View Post
Hilliest: San Francisco or Seattle
Flattest: Houston or Atlanta
Atlanta among the flattest let alone flat LOFL, Atlanta is some where in the top ten hilliest.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
I was just in Atlanta and drove around it extensively...it is not at all flat...it is very hilly. Not a single flat part of the city that I could find, and many of the hills were steeply sloped.
That's because outside of Downtown there's not, Piedmont mean foot hills. You wasn't trippin.

http://landcovertrends.usgs.gov/east...s/image001.jpg

12 of Atlanta northern suburban counties are include in Appalachia, Which is probably not too fall off Pittsburgh MSA population. But Most people wouldn't think part of Atlanta as Appalachia even though the Appalachia Regional commission do. But I'm just stressing the hills.

Counties in Appalachia - Appalachian Regional Commission


http://www.umich.edu/~econdev/arc/appalachia.jpeg

Anyways I think we need to look at hilly in two ways.

Large hills, with a lot of homes on one large ridge, in a slope.

Smaller rolling hills every where, with homes on different grades.

Which brings another question are we counting undeveloped mountains in MSA's or just develop areas?

Last edited by JMT; 09-08-2012 at 10:57 AM..
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Old 02-01-2012, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Reading PA
172 posts, read 192,972 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbarn View Post
San Jose and Phoenix aren't particularly hilly, but I wouldn't list them among the flattest. For example, East San Jose is pretty hilly, its right and the foot of some pretty significant hills. This LINK demonstrates what I'm talking about in San Jose. There are parts of Phoenix that are similar (although not as green!)
OK, I stand corrected about San Antone, San Jose and Phoenix. However traveling through phoenix, it did seem quite flat except for the mountains in the distant north and east
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Old 02-01-2012, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
1,376 posts, read 2,442,050 times
Reputation: 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
Atlanta among the flattest let alone flat LOFL, Atlanta is some where in the top ten hilliest.


That's because outside of Downtown there's not, Piedmont mean foot hills. You wasn't trippin.


http://landcovertrends.usgs.gov/east...s/image001.jpg

12 of Atlanta northern suburban counties are include in Appalachia, Which is probably not too fall off Pittsburgh MSA population. But Most people wouldn't think part of Atlanta as Appalachia even though the Appalachia Regional commission do. But I'm just stressing the hills.

Counties in Appalachia - Appalachian Regional Commission



http://www.umich.edu/~econdev/arc/appalachia.jpeg

Anyways I think we need to look at hilly in two ways.

Large hills, with a lot of homes on one large ridge, in a slope.

Smaller rolling hills every where, with homes on different grades.

Which brings another question are we counting undeveloped mountains in MSA's or just develop areas?
I realise I've gotten a lot of back-lash for putting Atlanta there. If I remember correctly I meant to say Miami, but somehow typed Atlanta. When I noticed this, it was too late to change it.
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Old 02-02-2012, 09:29 PM
 
434 posts, read 427,147 times
Reputation: 153
Duluth, Minnesota is built on a bug hill. It's not really a major city, with only about 85000 residents. You have to go down about a 6 percent slope on the main street to get downtown. It can get pretty crazy with the snow in the winter.
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