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Old 01-26-2019, 10:41 PM
 
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Detroit is as flat as the proverbial board.
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Old 01-27-2019, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
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Sacramento might be the flattest city over 2 million people, but I don't know that for a fact...
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Old 01-28-2019, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,387,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
Yes, this sub-tropical region that goes up to Philly and NYC gets a lot of play and you just shake your head. Once you've seen Florida and the Gulf Coast .... the rest but for right on the coast. Isn't going to cut it whether technically it is or not.

Some even claimed a Magnolia tree was some standard in able to survive in this subtropical region. But most of us expect much more a look of tropical in sub-tropical......
The Humid Sub-Tropical region in the US is not the Tropics--that is a false assumption for people that don't understand the climate zones. Philly/NJ/Delaware are the furthest Northern reaches of the region so there will obviously be some differences with Florida/Georgia, etc. Technically Miami may still be sub-tropical, but it is so close to the Tropics so there is much resemblance.


Even the Philly area is on the same Northern parallel as the island of Ibiza in Spain believe it or not.

Last edited by 2e1m5a; 01-28-2019 at 01:50 PM..
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Old 01-29-2019, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,567 posts, read 1,830,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyBanany View Post
Hilliest-
San Francisco
Seattle
Portland
Los Angeles
Pittsburgh
Omaha

Flattest-
Oklahoma City
Kansas City
Minneapolis
Denver (believe it or not)
Phoenix
Las Vegas
Sioux Falls
Disagree Denver would fall into the "very flat" category. When considering the metro area and not just Denver proper, there are plenty of hills (I've slidden down some of them in my car during snow.)

Chicago? Very flat.
Phoenix? Generally flat but has mountains scattered throughout the metro, so not VERY flat.
San Diego? Hilly to quite hilly

How come no one mentions how flat Florida cities are?
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Old 01-29-2019, 12:40 PM
 
3,220 posts, read 1,551,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
The Humid Sub-Tropical region in the US is not the Tropics--that is a false assumption for people that don't understand the climate zones. Philly/NJ/Delaware are the furthest Northern reaches of the region so there will obviously be some differences with Florida/Georgia, etc. Technically Miami may still be sub-tropical, but it is so close to the Tropics so there is much resemblance.

Even the Philly area is on the same Northern parallel as the island of Ibiza in Spain believe it or not.
The "Gulf Stream" from the tropes. Moderates western Europe and especially Great Britain to southern Norway. Like i said. throwing sub-tropical around even for Atlanta ..... which was my reply. For me is not seen in any degree for a boast. I merely noted its northern push technically goes much further north too.

But I'm clearly not going to see Southeastern PA as truly Sub-Tropical in attributes. I replied in that argument where a Magnolia tree surviving was some trait. None would survive our record cold tonight without protection. No one posted one living in Philly either. Still a odd assessment.

Again, once you see Florida and into the Gulf Coast as Sub-Tropical? But for coastal southeast perhaps? I see no boast for a Atlanta to Philly. Then the whole .... is Philly coastal too claiming the Jersey Shore.... So TROPICAL still needs some aspects to look too (for me to have value). We ALL KNOW it isn't really about BEING Tropical in traits. Only climates a bit more moderated.... and by its more northern technical climate terms for use reaches. Why it holds very limited weight in reality.

But it's C-D and things come into threads that whether technically true or inferred for reasons. But sometimes its a stretch too. The Rust-Belt reach is another that leaves out Philly as technically not in it.


All my opinion for much. But Philly clearly isn't labeled all flat for the thread. But far from hilliest.
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Old 01-29-2019, 01:59 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,161,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
The "Gulf Stream" from the tropes. Moderates western Europe and especially Great Britain to southern Norway. Like i said. throwing sub-tropical around even for Atlanta ..... which was my reply. For me is not seen in any degree for a boast. I merely noted its northern push technically goes much further north too.

But I'm clearly not going to see Southeastern PA as truly Sub-Tropical in attributes. I replied in that argument where a Magnolia tree surviving was some trait. None would survive our record cold tonight without protection. No one posted one living in Philly either. Still a odd assessment.

Again, once you see Florida and into the Gulf Coast as Sub-Tropical? But for coastal southeast perhaps? I see no boast for a Atlanta to Philly. Then the whole .... is Philly coastal too claiming the Jersey Shore.... So TROPICAL still needs some aspects to look too (for me to have value). We ALL KNOW it isn't really about BEING Tropical in traits. Only climates a bit more moderated.... and by its more northern technical climate terms for use reaches. Why it holds very limited weight in reality.

But it's C-D and things come into threads that whether technically true or inferred for reasons. But sometimes its a stretch too. The Rust-Belt reach is another that leaves out Philly as technically not in it.


All my opinion for much. But Philly clearly isn't labeled all flat for the thread. But far from hilliest.


The more moderate subtropical zone hits extreme SE Jersey (think basically the cape and De beaches)




Cape May (Which rarely gets snow and is as far south as DC actually) and is mostly due to the Gulf stream that come up to about there on the EC then heads east) also why Hurricanes can be as intense in NJ as they are at times


Philly is a little further in land (basically on a tidal river (salt line reaches Philly at times, but is usually a little south) at the mouth of the river and the DE bay, well a few miles north of that.


All that said Cape May is not really the metro (very much summer weekend land for Philly and much Philly influence etc but not really the metro from a commuter standpoint)


On the thread topic, area wise the Philly metro is about half very flat (including a lot of the city itself, though the NW sections begin the foothills of the Appalachians) including pretty much all of the NJ burbs and most DE burbs. The rest of the metro (basically draw a line 2-3 miles west of the De river to Trenton (to the falls line)) and everything west is very hilly and east is very flat. The Western part of Delaware and even more so Most of Montgomery, Bucks north and west of route 1, and basically all of Chester counties are very hilly and undulated. There are ski slopes with nearly 1000 foot verticals at the edge of the metro that direction. This is basically where the mountains hit the tidal plains on the coast, and the River itself came through the Delaware water and then runs along the edge of the foothills. (below is the De River Valley in Bucks)





NYC also has this dynamic, LI and most of the city and NJ counties closer to the coast are generally very flat, NW NJ, the Hudson valley in NY are very hilly (even a lot of CT is pretty hilly actually)


Below is the Hudson River Valley in West Chester County NY (not all that far from Manhattan actually)


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Old 01-29-2019, 02:04 PM
 
Location: The City
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oh Magnolia trees do survive in that part of NJ as an FYI
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Old 01-29-2019, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
637 posts, read 1,033,164 times
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We have needle palms and Magnolia in Cincinnati as well. Someone had a small palm tree in a courtyard downtown once, but it was dead by February.
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Old 01-29-2019, 04:51 PM
 
3,220 posts, read 1,551,871 times
Reputation: 2352
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
The more moderate subtropical zone hits extreme SE Jersey (think basically the cape and De beaches)
Cape May (Which rarely gets snow and is as far south as DC actually) and is mostly due to the Gulf stream that come up to about there on the EC then heads east) also why Hurricanes can be as intense in NJ as they are at times

Philly is a little further in land (basically on a tidal river (salt line reaches Philly at times, but is usually a little south) at the mouth of the river and the DE bay, well a few miles north of that.

All that said Cape May is not really the metro (very much summer weekend land for Philly and much Philly influence etc but not really the metro from a commuter standpoint)

On the thread topic, area wise the Philly metro is about half very flat (including a lot of the city itself, though the NW sections begin the foothills of the Appalachians) including pretty much all of the NJ burbs and most DE burbs. The rest of the metro (basically draw a line 2-3 miles west of the De river to Trenton (to the falls line)) and everything west is very hilly and east is very flat. The Western part of Delaware and even more so Most of Montgomery, Bucks north and west of route 1, and basically all of Chester counties are very hilly and undulated. There are ski slopes with nearly 1000 foot verticals at the edge of the metro that direction. This is basically where the mountains hit the tidal plains on the coast, and the River itself came through the Delaware water and then runs along the edge of the foothills. (below is the De River Valley in Bucks)


NYC also has this dynamic, LI and most of the city and NJ counties closer to the coast are generally very flat, NW NJ, the Hudson valley in NY are very hilly (even a lot of CT is pretty hilly actually)
Below is the Hudson River Valley in West Chester County NY (not all that far from Manhattan actually)
Honestly, those pictures you posted.... look nearly identical to the Susquehanna River valley in Central PA by me. I'm not sure why this helps any Sub-Tropical references.

Guess Magnolia trees are common in Jersey and Philly too and Cincy.
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