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Old 11-23-2008, 02:07 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
135 posts, read 727,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
It's recognizeable only to people who live in Duluth...believe me, no one else would recognize the skyline of Duluth.
IMHO, I wouldn't even consider that a skyline. What skyline??

 
Old 11-23-2008, 03:01 AM
 
196 posts, read 566,518 times
Reputation: 106
From my personal experience, Houston, Atlanta, Dallas, Miami, and Charlotte have very pronounced skylines.
 
Old 11-23-2008, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,230 posts, read 11,626,749 times
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Dallas' skyline is quite recognizable.
 
Old 11-26-2008, 07:52 AM
 
4,677 posts, read 8,014,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Racial tension was part of life all over the U.S. - it wasn't and isn't something unique to the South.
I could sit here and go over history with you that would point out why the racial problems in the South were a little bit more severe but for short I will just mention the Jim Crow laws which had larger implications in apartheid in South Africa. But the Jim Crow laws I think still give the South a scar in a different light than other racial tensions in the country. But that is a nice point. But the South had its racial tensions systemized.
 
Old 11-26-2008, 09:48 AM
 
756 posts, read 1,691,948 times
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You only recognize things you see regularly and build into memory. Houston doesn't get enough exposure which is fine. It has three skylines basically forming a triangle. The first picture is downtown. Second picture is uptown/Galleria view from downtown. Third is the Texas Medical Center, about 3-4 miles south of downtown. Fourth picture is Greenway Plaza, a business park about a mile to the east of the galleria and in between downtown and TMC. Fifth is a foggy view of downtown from the Galleria.
Attached Thumbnails
Why are the skylines of Southern Cities so unrecognizable?-vfiles26234.jpg   Why are the skylines of Southern Cities so unrecognizable?-163003170_cb8354ccb8.jpg   Why are the skylines of Southern Cities so unrecognizable?-flighthoustontodallas086.jpg   Why are the skylines of Southern Cities so unrecognizable?-hdr-greenway-plaza-night.jpg   Why are the skylines of Southern Cities so unrecognizable?-sk1.jpg  

 
Old 11-26-2008, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,213 posts, read 9,993,860 times
Reputation: 5829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canine*Castle View Post
Dallas' skyline is quite recognizable.
Could the reason be the opening sequence from J.R.'s TV series and the flying zoom shot of the Reunion Tower in the forefront with the rest of downtown rising up from the Trinity River basin?

The reason many of the cities' skylines aren't recongizable to those outside their areas is because of lack of coverage. If we don't visit these areas, we are dependent on pictures in magazines or television. The Dallas TV show helped put the city of Dallas' skyline on display every week.

Houston and Atlanta have arguably better skylines than Dallas, but didn't have the weekly plug that Dallas had. Also, Dallas hasn't changed that much downtown since the 80s when the TV show was in prime time, at least to the amount of change that has happened to Atlanta and Houston in the same time period.

Of course the New York skyline is etched into anyone's head that peruses any form of media. It's just out there. Seattle and San Francisco have so much going gegraphically and have iconic monuments (space needle and Golden Gate Bridge) that makes them easy to spot. Take away the geographical features and the space needle, tho and Seattle is Charlotte or Minneapolis to anyone who hasn't been there.

But this thread is about the skyline and the skyline takes in the whole, the icons, the old, the new and the geographical features. So the new cities of the south as well as midwestern cities with no coast, lake, harbor or mountains, the buildings have to do all the work in this great skyline race.
 
Old 11-26-2008, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,213 posts, read 9,993,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coog78 View Post
You only recognize things you see regularly and build into memory. Houston doesn't get enough exposure which is fine. It has three skylines basically forming a triangle. The first picture is downtown. Second picture is uptown/Galleria view from downtown. Third is the Texas Medical Center, about 3-4 miles south of downtown. Fourth picture is Greenway Plaza, a business park about a mile to the east of the galleria and in between downtown and TMC. Fifth is a foggy view of downtown from the Galleria.
Atlanta is similar to Houston in that the downtown skyline gets competition within its own city from other areas. Downtown Atlanta almost is being dwarfed by midtown and with more new developments in midtown, it is the place in the city where the skyline is changing the most rapidly.

Further north, Buckhead is gaining a skyline itself that the majority of American cities would be envious of. The Perimeter district north of that is a fouth distinctive skyline and just to the west of that and northwest of downtown, the Cumberland area is nothing to sneeze at.

The skyline from downtown to midtown is developing linearly (if that is a word) along Peachtree and will one day unite. Really there aren't too many gaps as it is right now (wish I knew how to post pictures). If Atlanta continues to sprout upwards along Peachtree and midtown one day joins with Buckhead, when viewed from east or west, that will be a skyline to remember. Not too shabby right now anyway.
 
Old 11-26-2008, 10:25 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,204,126 times
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With the multitude of pyramids/cones/spires/flat tops/other distinct features and the variety of materials/glass/granite/masonry/etc., Atlanta's skyline is pretty easy to identify after seeing it a couple of times. There are several distinct, standout buildings that help as well, BOA/One Atlantic/191 Peachtree/Suntrust/Promenade/Westin/Georgia Dome...and the huge amount of tree cover.






In this photo it's possible to tell that the Downtown and Midtown skylines have connected...there are highrises and infill continuously, with the exception of where the connector cuts a huge path through the city.
 
Old 11-27-2008, 08:09 AM
 
756 posts, read 1,691,948 times
Reputation: 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
With the multitude of pyramids/cones/spires/flat tops/other distinct features and the variety of materials/glass/granite/masonry/etc., Atlanta's skyline is pretty easy to identify after seeing it a couple of times. There are several distinct, standout buildings that help as well, BOA/One Atlantic/191 Peachtree/Suntrust/Promenade/Westin/Georgia Dome...and the huge amount of tree cover.






In this photo it's possible to tell that the Downtown and Midtown skylines have connected...there are highrises and infill continuously, with the exception of where the connector cuts a huge path through the city.
Atlanta is similar to Houston but with fewer skyscrapers and less density. Like comparing New York to Chicago.
 
Old 11-27-2008, 08:45 AM
 
4,677 posts, read 8,014,654 times
Reputation: 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
With the multitude of pyramids/cones/spires/flat tops/other distinct features and the variety of materials/glass/granite/masonry/etc., Atlanta's skyline is pretty easy to identify after seeing it a couple of times. There are several distinct, standout buildings that help as well, BOA/One Atlantic/191 Peachtree/Suntrust/Promenade/Westin/Georgia Dome...and the huge amount of tree cover.






In this photo it's possible to tell that the Downtown and Midtown skylines have connected...there are highrises and infill continuously, with the exception of where the connector cuts a huge path through the city.
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