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Old 02-14-2009, 08:58 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,289,681 times
Reputation: 2698

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^I don't tend to think so. The height limit works against it, IMO.

I think Atlanta has the most recognizable Southern skyline.

 
Old 02-15-2009, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Oahu
731 posts, read 1,817,436 times
Reputation: 299
We can all say "Well, you're ignorant if you dont recognize this building or that building" but the point remains some things are instantly recognizable to most people- and many cities don't have those things.

SF: Golden Gate, TransAmerica Building (the pyramid one!)
Seattle: Space Needle, Mt Rainier
New York: Empire State, Brooklyn Bridge, Statue of Liberty
St. Louis: Arch
Chicago: Lake Michigan, Sears Tower, John Hancock
DC: Washington Monument

Then things get sticky:

People recognize LA only because they see it often (I guess that counts for NY and Chicago too). The US Bank building is more or less recognizable, but it can look like many other buildings. The mountains are beautiful, but if you see a palm tree in the foreground, that setting could be Denver or SLC.

Charlotte has the BoA building, but...that could be anything, again. It's not iconic. Yes, I know what it is, but...would most people?

Atlanta has the Peachtree, but from many angles you can't see it, since other, less identifiable buildings have surrounded it. You can sorta tell if you get a wide shot and you can see the multiple skylines, because most cities of Atlanta's size won't have them, very spread out like that.

Dallas is instantly recognizable at night because of the building with the green edging. During the day? Not so much.

Houston has the building that looks serrated, but you can't see that from every angle.

Miami has the ocean and the bridge to Miami Beach, but otherwise?

I'm sure I can recgonize any metro areas skyline if it's over 1-2 million- basically the 'major league' cities. But most people? After the most easily identifiable 5-6 it gets very muddy.
 
Old 03-21-2009, 01:01 AM
 
2 posts, read 3,655 times
Reputation: 10
Default To lammus

First of all, you should know your facts before you make a statement. As far as the Bank of America buildings in Charlotte and Atlanta, Bank of America bought C&S bank based in Atlanta in 1991. At the time, C&S was already building what is now the Bank of America tower in Atlanta. So Bank of America did not build the building. The only thing that makes it taller than the one in Charlotte is a tall spire on top of the roof, so as far as floors, Charlotte's is taller. Secondly you obviously have never been to Charlotte, because it appears that you are reporting from Knoxville and if you are, how could you possibly call any place outside of your city boring?

Note:Take the picture of the skyline from the Interstate (there are a lot more buildings, and take it at night like some of the other skyline shots from other cities.
 
Old 03-21-2009, 01:14 AM
 
2 posts, read 3,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
True, it wasn't BOA who built Atlanta and Charlotte's towers, sort of. It was NationsBank, based in Charlotte, who built the two towers. NationsBank eventually bought Bank of America in SF, moved the HQ to Charlotte and renamed the entire company--including those two skyscrapers--Bank of America.
Nationsbank bought C&S in Atlanta, so it was a C&S tower FIRST!
 
Old 03-21-2009, 01:27 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,231,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linerman View Post
Nationsbank bought C&S in Atlanta, so it was a C&S tower FIRST!
Actually...NCNB bought C&S/Sovran while the tower was about half finished in 1991, and the newly merged bank was renamed NationsBank...so at the tower's completion in 1992 it was NationsBank Plaza.
 
Old 03-21-2009, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Alabama
50 posts, read 224,597 times
Reputation: 63
Few southern skylines are as bland as this one.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...hest_point.jpg

Birmingham, Alabama. I yawn every time I see it.
 
Old 03-21-2009, 08:09 AM
 
1,967 posts, read 1,576,833 times
Reputation: 844
I would say Miami is the most recognizable skyline of the south. The strip of neon hotels along South beach is an instant "thats Miami!"

Other than that, the average person probably couldn't name the city if you showed them the skyline of say Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, New Orleans, Jacksonville, Tampa, etc...
 
Old 03-21-2009, 10:48 AM
 
Location: St Louis
1,117 posts, read 2,587,434 times
Reputation: 363
I would say most southern skylines are unrecognizable. STL has one of the most recognizable skylines along with CHI, NY, Sea, and SF. They are in my opinion the most recognizable skylines.


St. Louis skyline at Sunset








This image has been resized. Click this bar to view the full image. The original image is sized 1200x581.
 
Old 03-21-2009, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,484 posts, read 16,102,491 times
Reputation: 5615
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linerman View Post
First of all, you should know your facts before you make a statement. As far as the Bank of America buildings in Charlotte and Atlanta, Bank of America bought C&S bank based in Atlanta in 1991. At the time, C&S was already building what is now the Bank of America tower in Atlanta. So Bank of America did not build the building. The only thing that makes it taller than the one in Charlotte is a tall spire on top of the roof, so as far as floors, Charlotte's is taller. Secondly you obviously have never been to Charlotte, because it appears that you are reporting from Knoxville and if you are, how could you possibly call any place outside of your city boring?

Note:Take the picture of the skyline from the Interstate (there are a lot more buildings, and take it at night like some of the other skyline shots from other cities.
First of all, check the thread again. lammius didn't say those things.
 
Old 03-21-2009, 11:22 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,231,130 times
Reputation: 2780
Which city skylines COULD the average person recognize? I don't think it's a problem with skylines in the South only...but with city skylines in general. I don't really believe that someone who can't recognize Nashville or Dallas would more easily recognize San Francisco or Philadelphia.

If someone has a general interest in skyscrapers or urban issues, he will recognize most large U.S. city skylines - no matter where they are located. Also, if someone has traveled to a city and actually seen the skyline in person, he is more likely to recognize it - no matter where it is located. It's not that southern skylines are less recognizable, but all skyline recognition depends on a person's exposure to skylines in general and/or to specific skylines.
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