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Old 04-16-2011, 06:04 PM
 
1,729 posts, read 3,845,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by west336 View Post
Minneapolis has more amenities than Portland and arguably as many as Seattle. .
Minneapolis isn't in the same stratosphere food wise as either Seattle or Portland. And it's not close. The availability of fresh produce, fruits, local wines, micro brews and seafood trumps Midwest Meats.
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Old 04-16-2011, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
1,309 posts, read 2,265,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Loney View Post
Minneapolis isn't in the same stratosphere food wise as either Seattle or Portland. And it's not close. The availability of fresh produce, fruits, local wines, micro brews and seafood trumps Midwest Meats.
Seattle pretty much ruined me for seafood anywhere else...being from the center of the country and all. Damn.

Although my micro-brew experience left me wanting...I wonder if you Seattle-ites are on a *teensy* high horse about your beer. I totally prefer the Colorado scene that made me fall in love with good beer. Could have just been my experience. I need to get back there.

Sorry, off-topic! (Although this thread devolved into a battle of one-upsmanship quite some time ago)
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Old 04-16-2011, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Oregon
292 posts, read 618,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Loney View Post
Minneapolis isn't in the same stratosphere food wise as either Seattle or Portland. And it's not close. The availability of fresh produce, fruits, local wines, micro brews and seafood trumps Midwest Meats.
I have to agree with you. From many places I have visited, Northwest produce is very fresh. Lots of them are organic. Oregon strawberries is tough to beat.
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Old 04-16-2011, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 8,898,310 times
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Given your criteria, I'd pick Seattle.

If you throw in personal economics, I'd try to move to Vancouver, Washington, although there may not be a lot of film activity there. You see, you wan work in Washington and pay no state income tax but shop in Portland, Oregon and pay no sales tax on most basic and grocery items. Just make sure you live in Vancouver so you can have that arrangement.

Minneapolis is a very viable choice, but the winters there suck. For that reason alone I can't recommend it unless you truly don't mind cold weather.
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Old 04-16-2011, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Limbo
6,458 posts, read 5,906,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EclecticEars View Post
Given your criteria, I'd pick Seattle.

If you throw in personal economics, I'd try to move to Vancouver, Washington, although there may not be a lot of film activity there. You see, you wan work in Washington and pay no state income tax but shop in Portland, Oregon and pay no sales tax on most basic and grocery items. Just make sure you live in Vancouver so you can have that arrangement.

Minneapolis is a very viable choice, but the winters there suck. For that reason alone I can't recommend it unless you truly don't mind cold weather.
Sucky winters is so subjective. Personally, I love Minneapolis for that cold and snow. Sure, around March I want it to go away, but I wouldn't move to a different climate because I'm a bit nippy at the end of the snow season.

I can see how people would get turned off by the prospect of a few months of cold, though. People in the south think 50 in the winter is cold too, I don't see them moving further south

Basically, all three are excellent places to live. No doubt about that. One just has a bit of the white stuff that falls from clouds.
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Old 04-19-2011, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Milwaukie, Oregon
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I would suggest Portland. I don't know much about Minneapolis, I've only been to the airport and train station there. I don't know Seattle very well either, but it feels very big whenever I'm there. The public transportation is decent, though, from what I've heard.

I live in Portland with no car, and it's been great. I ride my bike to and from work, with no problems. Most drivers are very courteous to pedestrians and bikes. The bus and MAX (train) are very convenient. Portland is the most bike friendly city in the country, and also has the best public transportation.

The cost of living isn't too bad here. If you are interested in living with roommates look at craigslist, that's how I found my place. Getting your own place might be a bit expensive, depending on what part of town.

Being a single female here, I have never had any problems. Just have to be smart, like anywhere else. There's a lot of great food here, very vegetarian/vegan friendly. A lot of music, very creativity friendly city. And I'm sure you could find language lessons, maybe look at craigslist for that too, or Portland Community College, depending on what language you want to learn.
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Old 04-19-2011, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Capitol Hill - Seattle
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Default Seattle

Speaking personally, Seattle would win out of the three. I like mild climates. Portland (though I love it) has a very weak economy. Even as we speak, Seattle has kicked back into high gear re: building new apartment complexes, etc, hiring (Amazon), while I see Portland sitting fairly stagnant. I honestly think in the next few years Seattle will outpace Portland more than it has been; it is truly establishing itself as the alpha city of the PNW. With almost 4.2 million people in the CSA, it is clearly the largest of the bunch. Our cosmopolitan neighbo(u)r Vancouver is much smaller in comparison. Minneapolis is probably one of the closest true competitors to Seattle in this country, but for me, the coastal allure and climate of Seattle win. I like being a couple hour drive from both Vancouver and Portland, though I go to both infrequently due to what Seattle can offer. Also fairly close by are the forests of the Cascades and Olympics. I think outside the sunbelt, this city is one of the up-and-coming places to be in the US.



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Last edited by DJKirkland; 04-19-2011 at 08:09 PM..
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Old 04-19-2015, 12:10 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,478,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Loney View Post
Minneapolis isn't in the same stratosphere food wise as either Seattle or Portland. And it's not close. The availability of fresh produce, fruits, local wines, micro brews and seafood trumps Midwest Meats.
I find the cuisine here pretty mediocre actually, especially the Chinese food (bleh). The produce is amazing though you are right.
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Old 04-19-2015, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 7,916,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emcee squared View Post
Sucky winters is so subjective. Personally, I love Minneapolis for that cold and snow. Sure, around March I want it to go away, but I wouldn't move to a different climate because I'm a bit nippy at the end of the snow season.

I can see how people would get turned off by the prospect of a few months of cold, though. People in the south think 50 in the winter is cold too, I don't see them moving further south

Basically, all three are excellent places to live. No doubt about that. One just has a bit of the white stuff that falls from clouds.
The cold in Minneapolis is a boon to the region for winter activities the same with the heat in the South/Midwest/Northeast/Southwest is a boon to the region for summer activities -- in both situations, the extreme weather allows for more fun outdoor activities, like skating and skiing during winter, and swimming and boating during summer. Precisely because it's below freezing 3 months of the year in Minneapolis, you can do almost anything you can think of for outdoor recreation and winter sports. Similarly, summer is warm enough so that swimming in the pools, lakes or rivers is actually enjoyable and sought after, whereas I would personally think 2 or 3 times before stepping a foot in the water during summer in Seattle (Portland is a little warmer, so water activities may be more bearable there).

Otherwise, winters can and do suck when it's too cold to enjoy being outside but not cold enough to enjoy outdoor winter recreational activities that make being outside bearable. There's a silver lining benefit to the cold.
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Old 04-20-2015, 05:01 AM
 
1,333 posts, read 1,154,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
Because of our crap weather Minneapolis didn't get overrun by yuppies the way Seattle did or the way Portland will in the near future. So we will still be cool in 20 years.
I though Minneapolis' main "hip" phase was in the 80s?

Strange thing I noticed when I was there was it seemed to have a big lgbt and hipster set, but the overall vibe didn't feel dominated by either group. If anything it felt like a healthy, outdoorsy, young professionals city.

As for the no car thing in Minneapolis it seemed doable, but you had to pick your area carefully and with the extra distance it seemed like no matter which of the three main areas you picked you were probably going to have to limit your time spent in one of the the three.

Dinky town and Uptown were a lot smaller than I was expecting.

I thought Uptown was going to be a lot closer (I think it's about 3 miles from downtown give or take).

A big surprise was how great the city is for bicycles. Before I went I figured it was going to be good, but also hyped up. After visiting I'd say it's not as extensive as Portland for bikes, but better designed overall.

Once the light rail adds a few more lines I may reconsider moving to the Twin Cities.
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