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View Poll Results: New York City vs Hong Kong
New York City 36 53.73%
Hong Kong 31 46.27%
Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 10-30-2008, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,361 posts, read 7,062,697 times
Reputation: 3974

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank_Carbonni View Post
Uh, Hong Kong was a small fishing village for almost its entire history. It was small time up until the Brits took it over.
It still doesn't negate the fact that it has a longer history. Do you think all of the ancient civilizations had populations the size of NYC?

 
Old 10-30-2008, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Scarsdale, NY
2,775 posts, read 10,573,628 times
Reputation: 794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank_Carbonni View Post
Slums in Somalia are safer than than Brownsvill?!

Say what?!

Have you heard about the things that go on in Somalia? Do you know what a technical is? The warlords in Somalia would eat the UBN alive.
Ever heard of the Russian Mob, Chinese Mob, Italian Mob, Dominican Mob, etc?

You can get away with almost anything in a third world country... But in America you can be thrown in jail for the littlest things. we have advanced technology and we can figure out who killed who these days. But if you put NYC's Mobs out in Somalia, the Mob would be more dangerous. Russians, especially... Smuggling in grenade launchers, grenades, machine guns, etc.

Warlords vs. the Russian Mafia? The Mafia would win. The Mob is advanced, organized, and they'll kill you for a penny or even a bad tone of voice.
 
Old 10-30-2008, 03:00 PM
 
Location: NYC
190 posts, read 820,380 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by At1WithNature View Post
Does your crystal ball give the lotto results as well? j/k how did you know that though, farmer's almanac?
The News
 
Old 10-30-2008, 08:55 PM
 
Location: San Diego
217 posts, read 224,556 times
Reputation: 37
New york is the best no matter what
 
Old 10-31-2008, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,057 posts, read 29,742,612 times
Reputation: 10455
I imagine this will never end. New York versus this city...New York versus that city. Hey, you people from other cities: we're not in competition with you (and whether or not you know it, you should be thankful!)
 
Old 12-15-2008, 08:24 AM
 
1 posts, read 2,033 times
Reputation: 10
Futcha had better review his comments. Frankly, you haven't been to Hong Kong if you only set eyes on chewing gum on the streets and clothes dangling off the ends of hangars. It's not like New York is any better. At least Hong Kong doesn't have enough muggers and terrorists to rip off another ten-thousand 9/11s. Pah! Bush's half-corrupted regime hasn't helped anyone in the world either, with Bin Laden still on the loose and Bush's troops running halfway around the world just to find him... Down with America
 
Old 01-27-2009, 10:56 PM
HKL
 
20 posts, read 48,302 times
Reputation: 20
I just read this thread and decided to register and give a reply. Some of the points, mainly the ones in the beginning, were interesting. In case anyone from NY would like to visit or live in HK, here are some facts - I'll try to keep this factual. But just in case it sounds opinionated, the points below are from an asian who has lived in both cities. So keep in mind the point of view.

For visitors - please do visit. Both cities are great and worth the time (equally yet differently) if you have not been there yet. There really isn't much to argue. Somebody before mentioned the amount of "Art, Culture, History, Architecture" and (I'll add) Food in HK and NY. They're just different from a general perspective.

Art - there is art. No there are no museums like the Met. There aren't any graffiti either. The museums are good, but I don't think it does it justice and that's because I think a lot of the feel in the art of HK goes along with the historic architecture, the trams, ferries, the environment. I don't really know how to explain this. I think the best way to put it is that if you're looking for expensive collections of artifacts and ancient priceless art, HK will be able to show you that in a museum but nothing mind boggling. But things in general look better. For instance, there's a huge mural printed on the North Point subway station done by children. Trams and buses are painted in different color schemes. Once in a while you see one of those historical trams. There's a light show every day at 8pm if you go to avenue of the stars which has a great view of the harbour. I think the best way to put it is that HK's version of graffiti is done in a positive way around the environment.

History-wise, it does have a lot. I think main difference between HK history and NY history is that HK history happens very quickly, even today. Changes happen quicker in HK and I believe it has to do with the economy in HK being a lot more competitive. Local restaurants come and go more often. Development is also much quicker. Americanboy posted some photos of HK's slums and a couple of them are photos of the Kowloon Walled City which was torn down in the late 80's (I think?). A lot of history happened there. The HK history museum explains all of that.

However, if you are looking for pop culture, HK is garbage. There are a few good singers but for chinese pop culture I prefer taiwanese music.

Food wise, HK is much better for the price. From my experience, the seafood in HK is also a lot better. However, that point might be questionable since there are a lot of restaurants in NY that I cannot afford (nor can my parents). Regardless, I would have a hard time believing that people would be disappointed with the food in HK.

Architecture - In general, I like it. A lot of people like it. The people on this forum shows that a lot of people don't (this is new to me actually). I think this has more to do with what you grew up looking at. When I was in kindergarten I didn't draw the white house or empire state building or even know what the hell they were. I drew the Central Plaza in HK, and I think it's one of the prettiest buildings in the world. Really reminds me of the 90's. I also love the HSBC tower.

To Live - here are some of the most noticable differences

Transportation in HK makes NY's public transport look like a 3rd world country's transportation. The 2nd biggest difference between them are the frequencies of buses and trains. I live in Brooklyn and it isn't uncommon for me to wait 10 min for a train for non rush hour and about 6 min during rush hour. When I lived in Manhattan it was like 6 min normal and 4 min for rush hour. In HK island during non-rush hour it's more like 3 min for a train during non rush hour and 1 min a train during rush hour. But that's nothing compared to track work. I just can't accept service that takes me to my destination in 1 hr when it's supposed to take 30 min, and when they do track work, it's like almost a weekly basis for about 3-4 weeks. Not to mention when the tracks get flooded and other crap. I was also forced to accidentally witness an American women pissing on the stairs of canal street DURING RUSH HOUR when loads of people were walking by!!! What the heck!?!??!

Stores and stuff opens later. Eating/dining late is easier in HK. Therefore......People have to work harder. So it's a trade off.

There are many central park equivalents. If you look at the HK skyline, behind those mountains are an amusement park, beaches, nature stuff. Someone brought up that point that rollercoasters don't matter on a visit and I agree. But I think it would matter if you live there. There's a reason why Ocean Park is profiting and has been for as long as I remember. These locations are all within 10-15 min from downtown. There are more if you wish to travel further.

Air quality is much worse in HK. Period.

Crime rate is awesome in HK. I've never gotten into any problems in HK. NY on the other hand was problematic. In the first 2 years of living here, I've been: kicked for not buying candy from some kind trying to sell candy on the street (Bryant Park) and punched in the bloody face by two guys trying to steal my wallet (Downtown Brooklyn). My friend got mugged at gun point in downtown Manhattan. Stories like these go on and on.

Weather is great in HK. I think it's 80% sun? Winters can get cold because of the humidity, but there is no snow. It won't feel cold if you walk fast or run, but since it's humid, the cold comes in gradually.

Cleaniness - HK is a lot cleaner. Period.

I hope this gives everyone a good comparison of HK vs NY. Also, I'm not an expert in either city, or anything really, so visit/live in HK at your own risk.
 
Old 01-29-2009, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 12,722,789 times
Reputation: 1819
^^You experienced a lot more crime in NY than most people have in their entire lives here. I've been teaching in the south Bronx for 2 years and nothing has happened to me here.
 
Old 01-29-2009, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Boston
7,347 posts, read 15,324,434 times
Reputation: 8626
HKL, Welcome and thanks for a detailed response. I've been watching this thread for a while and have avoided responding due to the fact that the cities are SOOO different it's just tough to compare.

A few of my observations of your post are as follows (note: I've spent time in both cities):

1) Architecture. I love HK's architecture... I really do. Architecture is also subjective, everyone has a different opinion. I still like New York City better due to the diversity of architectural styles. HK is a beacon of modern, high-density architectural styles. They are gorgeous (Bank of China Tower and 2IFC are among my favorite modern highrises). I love the residential buildings in HK... simply incredible the massive size of them. THe difference is, since HK blossomed in such a short period, there are few remaining examples from other eras. One of the fascinating things about NYC is walking around and seeing the Flatiron Building, Art-Deco gems like the ESB, GE building and Chrysler Building, 60's and 70s boxes like the Citigroup Building. You also have ageless wonders like Grand Central and the Rowhouses of the Upper East Side. Then you have stunning modern examples like the NY Times building or Hearst Tower. I give NYC the architectural nod ONLY because of the diversity of styles represented within the city.

2) Food... HK by a landslide. NYC has some fanstastic fine-dining. I could go to New York and blow $400 on dinner for two and be more than OK with it because the food is that good. The difference, however, is that NYC has fewer options than HK in the realm of fast food and moderate-priced cuisine. HK has some excellent fine-dining establishments, but the street food and the ability to get QUALITY food in an instant is simply incredible. It's a testament to the pace of Hong Kong which is really much faster than NYC (just see you're post about subway service). You can get excellent meals for CHEAP right on the street in Hong Kong and it really beats what NYC offers in that regard.

3) Public Spaces. This is tough. I love New York city's public spaces because they're (for the most part) very aesthetically pleasing. Many of the parks and plazas are just supurbly set up and constructed in New York City. Hong Kong doesn't have that kind of detailing in public spaces. HOWEVER... people make better use out of public spaces in Hong Kong than they do in New York. It's amazing what you see in the way of vendors, children playing, people relaxing, etc in public areas in Hong Kong. I would take the vibrance of Hong Kong's spaces over NYC's aesthetics any day. It's all about how WELL parks and plazas are used, not what they look like (though looks can have an effect on use for sure).

4)Accessibility to Recreation. This goes to Hong Kong, but really at no fault to New York City. Hong Kong is FAR more densely populated than NYC... there's a lot of people in a very small space in HK. New York sprawls out so far that it takes a while to leave the urban area. One of the things I noticed about HK was that while it seemed SO packed within the urban core, 20 minutes away, you were in a serene, outdoor setting. It's truly amazing.

5) Mass Transit: This is tough. Hong Kong has a slight advantage in that the city is so compact, it's easier to build subways, buses and trains that reach all the people. New York being more spread out makes this more difficult. I still think NYC does a good job. I don't like that MTA trains don't cross into New Jersey, it's a pain, but NYC's system is good. It's also older than Hong Kong's which will make it appear dirtier and dated (hence the frequent track work). I've long said that Washington D.C. has the best subway system in the U.S. I would, however, like to see how Hong Kong's holds up over time. Will the city continue to invest money into it or will it need frequent repairs in the near future? New York (2nd oldest subway system in the U.S.) continues to need work, but it's impressively still running relatively smoothly. I would hope that improvements are made in the near future... my nod goes to Hong Kong here.... for now.

in the end, like HKL said, both are fantastic and both are ENTIRELY different.
 
Old 01-29-2009, 01:37 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 2,626,878 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
HKL, Welcome and thanks for a detailed response. I've been watching this thread for a while and have avoided responding due to the fact that the cities are SOOO different it's just tough to compare.

A few of my observations of your post are as follows (note: I've spent time in both cities):

1) Architecture. I love HK's architecture... I really do. Architecture is also subjective, everyone has a different opinion. I still like New York City better due to the diversity of architectural styles. HK is a beacon of modern, high-density architectural styles. They are gorgeous (Bank of China Tower and 2IFC are among my favorite modern highrises). I love the residential buildings in HK... simply incredible the massive size of them. THe difference is, since HK blossomed in such a short period, there are few remaining examples from other eras. One of the fascinating things about NYC is walking around and seeing the Flatiron Building, Art-Deco gems like the ESB, GE building and Chrysler Building, 60's and 70s boxes like the Citigroup Building. You also have ageless wonders like Grand Central and the Rowhouses of the Upper East Side. Then you have stunning modern examples like the NY Times building or Hearst Tower. I give NYC the architectural nod ONLY because of the diversity of styles represented within the city.

2) Food... HK by a landslide. NYC has some fanstastic fine-dining. I could go to New York and blow $400 on dinner for two and be more than OK with it because the food is that good. The difference, however, is that NYC has fewer options than HK in the realm of fast food and moderate-priced cuisine. HK has some excellent fine-dining establishments, but the street food and the ability to get QUALITY food in an instant is simply incredible. It's a testament to the pace of Hong Kong which is really much faster than NYC (just see you're post about subway service). You can get excellent meals for CHEAP right on the street in Hong Kong and it really beats what NYC offers in that regard.

3) Public Spaces. This is tough. I love New York city's public spaces because they're (for the most part) very aesthetically pleasing. Many of the parks and plazas are just supurbly set up and constructed in New York City. Hong Kong doesn't have that kind of detailing in public spaces. HOWEVER... people make better use out of public spaces in Hong Kong than they do in New York. It's amazing what you see in the way of vendors, children playing, people relaxing, etc in public areas in Hong Kong. I would take the vibrance of Hong Kong's spaces over NYC's aesthetics any day. It's all about how WELL parks and plazas are used, not what they look like (though looks can have an effect on use for sure).

4)Accessibility to Recreation. This goes to Hong Kong, but really at no fault to New York City. Hong Kong is FAR more densely populated than NYC... there's a lot of people in a very small space in HK. New York sprawls out so far that it takes a while to leave the urban area. One of the things I noticed about HK was that while it seemed SO packed within the urban core, 20 minutes away, you were in a serene, outdoor setting. It's truly amazing.

5) Mass Transit: This is tough. Hong Kong has a slight advantage in that the city is so compact, it's easier to build subways, buses and trains that reach all the people. New York being more spread out makes this more difficult. I still think NYC does a good job. I don't like that MTA trains don't cross into New Jersey, it's a pain, but NYC's system is good. It's also older than Hong Kong's which will make it appear dirtier and dated (hence the frequent track work). I've long said that Washington D.C. has the best subway system in the U.S. I would, however, like to see how Hong Kong's holds up over time. Will the city continue to invest money into it or will it need frequent repairs in the near future? New York (2nd oldest subway system in the U.S.) continues to need work, but it's impressively still running relatively smoothly. I would hope that improvements are made in the near future... my nod goes to Hong Kong here.... for now.

in the end, like HKL said, both are fantastic and both are ENTIRELY different.

2) Food. Im wondering how you can compare food when we have food from different cultures around the world. Hence NYC was named the resturaunt city of the US but you cant compare when food is totally different. Maybe if you judging it on the same types of food made in both places but that can be hard if they are not eaten a certain way.

3) Thats not true we use every little space like tey recently put a little public area in between a cross section where within a day people were already using them. But its not an understanding but with 150 parks. Hundreds of public areas in small possible places and more bike lanes im pretty sure that people are using them.
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