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View Poll Results: Seattle vs. Stockholm?
Seattle 33 56.90%
Stockholm 25 43.10%
Voters: 58. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-28-2010, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Kerkrade, Limburg, Netherlands
262 posts, read 444,447 times
Reputation: 162

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsimms3 View Post
True about Malmo, I was generalizing. The two December bombs were in Stockholm, but for the past 3-5 years Malmo has been subjected to a whole lot more. My family is all in Stockholm and in Varmland (Sunne...grandmother grew up at Rottneros) and in Uppsala; I have never even been to Malmo.

When I say weird, I am referring to the whole setup and feel of the city, as well as some of the people there. It just reeks uber Socialism to me with all of the commie looking buildings and the new homogeneous apartment buildings being built in bulk. It never gets hot there, ever, and I always get the sense that it's in another universe, being so far north and disconnected. Even the people seem a little off and disconnected. Religion is an absolute joke in Sweden, and that also plays a role in my sense of disillusionment with the place. "Church-burning" music was basically invented there. It feels like a very Nordic (not so much anymore with more Africans and Muslims moving there) Commie nation with some pro-Capitalist tendencies (not the same as China) and a place where all humanists and anti-religion people can congregate. It's just plain weird. Even the colorful buildings in Gamla Stan (Old Town) look a little weird. And don't forget the sun will be shining at 11 o'clock at night in the summer, but it won't be shining at all in the winter (kind of cool, but also weird!).
Hmm even though I agree on some points you say, I also have to disagree on some.

In my opinion people there are Always friendly and nice and haven't experienced any Weird Socialism things.

The things about the huge buildings, hmm they look rather stylish to me, however That is an opinion which I can not say anything about.

The Churchburning aka Black metal comes from an English band called Venom. The second way of this music was from Norway. Norway also had the biggest problems with attacks on churches. I do admit that this sort of music also is big in Sweden, however it has nothing to do with the style looks and feeling of Stockholm.

Never gets hot? I was there quite some times already, and have experienced temperatures over 25 degrees there. That's a major generalisation about Sweden, its in the north it doesnt get hot. Thats wrong. I have worked there also for two months (summer job when I was 17) and 4/5weeks where over 25 degrees.

For the rest, it does stay an opinion ofcourse which one you like more and we have to respect that from eachother.

 
Old 12-28-2010, 12:58 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
2,112 posts, read 5,128,090 times
Reputation: 898
^^^I grew up in Florida. Maybe since you are from the Netherlands it can feel hot to you (??). 25 degrees is 77 degrees here in the states. That is a low nighttime temperature for the summer where I grew up. I don't think I have felt temps above 90 in Sweden (maybe it happens, but it doesn't feel like it). Seattle is kind of cool in that respect, too, but its winters aren't brutally cold, extremely dark, and very long (haven't been to PacNW, so maybe I shouldn't speak too soon, but I know based on lattitude and location they can't be like Sweden's winters).

Also, growing up in the US, more specifically the conservative state of Florida, Sweden seems to be what I would consider borderline Communist. The last few years have brought tax breaks and deregulation, and each income bracket pays exactly their fair share of taxes (as opposed to the top fifth here paying 1.35x more than their fair share as specified by the progressive bracket rates), but it's still heavily socialist, very expensive, and not an ideal place to live imho. I have spent a summer in Spain and visited several other Euro countries, and none "seems" as socialist as Sweden (though Spain is up there...better climate and prettier buildings to warm that up though).

I still have a good amount of family left there, but here is where my Swedish family has moved to in the past 30 years to "escape" Sweden. Keep in mind my family is very business oriented and very economically conservative, even from Sweden. None are religious (all atheist).

Austin, TX (my mom's cousin there is Sandra Bullock's neighbor )
Chicago, IL

Barranquilla and Medellin, Col. (my late uncle down there was actually Norwegian, married to my Swedish aunt, they have two children there still making dough and avoiding the 61% income/municipal tax, the 26% corporate tax on their family business, the 25% VAT tax, 30% cap gain tax, 2% transfer tax, 40% surcharge for non-disclosure or tax avoidance, another 20-30% for social security, bla bla bla)...they forfeited residency in Sweden because otherwise Sweden would have dealt them the same taxes down in Colombia because they deal in imports/exports with ties to Sweden and all Euro countries.

Cyprus
Hong Kong
Jacksonville, FL

Basically anywhere to avoid those taxes, brutal winters, and leftist ideologies.
 
Old 12-28-2010, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Sweden
22,868 posts, read 64,904,878 times
Reputation: 17823
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsimms3 View Post
True about Malmo, I was generalizing. The two December bombs were in Stockholm, but for the past 3-5 years Malmo has been subjected to a whole lot more. My family is all in Stockholm and in Varmland (Sunne...grandmother grew up at Rottneros) and in Uppsala; I have never even been to Malmo.

When I say weird, I am referring to the whole setup and feel of the city, as well as some of the people there. It just reeks uber Socialism to me with all of the commie looking buildings and the new homogeneous apartment buildings being built in bulk. It never gets hot there, ever, and I always get the sense that it's in another universe, being so far north and disconnected. Even the people seem a little off and disconnected. Religion is an absolute joke in Sweden, and that also plays a role in my sense of disillusionment with the place. "Church-burning" music was basically invented there. It feels like a very Nordic (not so much anymore with more Africans and Muslims moving there) Commie nation with some pro-Capitalist tendencies (not the same as China) and a place where all humanists and anti-religion people can congregate. It's just plain weird. Even the colorful buildings in Gamla Stan (Old Town) look a little weird. And don't forget the sun will be shining at 11 o'clock at night in the summer, but it won't be shining at all in the winter (kind of cool, but also weird!).
What does a commie building look like?
How do you see the difference between a communist building and a capitalist building?
 
Old 12-28-2010, 01:11 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
2,112 posts, read 5,128,090 times
Reputation: 898
I don't think I need to explain myself there BigSwede. Hötorgsskraporna and sergels torg give off those vibes. I actually like Sergels Square, and I don't know the names of individual commie blocks, but once you get out of the center city, they are everywhere just like they are in many European cities.

One thing I'll happily and easily give Stockholm over Seattle is its public transport, which very effectively connects all those commie blocks, LoL. No, but really it is one of the best systems and it somehow works for a city that is a bunch of islands and disjointed neighborhoods/blocks.
 
Old 12-28-2010, 01:35 PM
 
1,694 posts, read 4,952,920 times
Reputation: 689
Love Seattle but Stockholms in another league..
 
Old 12-28-2010, 07:42 PM
 
254 posts, read 416,929 times
Reputation: 229
Those old buildings may look pretty from the outside, but inside they suck. 800 year housing technology isn't great during the cold winter months or the humid summer months. And call me biased, but I go with Seattle. I don't want to live in a European museum....
 
Old 12-29-2010, 12:07 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
2,112 posts, read 5,128,090 times
Reputation: 898
Just watched a CNBC special on Howard Schultz of Starbucks fame. It was a little sentimental because I was able to meet him and hear him speak at my alma mater last year. A lot has come from Seattle, and I wouldn't sell Seattle short. Stockholm is breathtakingly beautiful around the harbor/Gamla Stan, and so is definitely a place to *visit*, but I feel like Seattle probably has a lot more to offer being that it is a much bigger city and has a decent history on its own. Both cities are liberal and green, but Stockholm is a very very expensive city without a lot of high paying jobs and a miserable climate and Seattle is a decently priced city with a ton of really high paying jobs and lower taxes.
 
Old 12-29-2010, 03:49 AM
 
Location: LA, US / Malmo, SWE
314 posts, read 733,980 times
Reputation: 246
True about the jobs jsimms3 but that has to do with Stockholm being in socialist Sweden and is a matter of political opinion. Stockholm doesn't have as many mentally disturbed people walking the streets, and would in my opinion be a better place to raise kids. Seattle isn't a much bigger city either, I guess if you count all the suburban sprawl that surrounds it but Stockholm actually feels a lot bigger if you're walking in the inner-city.

Seattle does have a great skyline I'll give you that, but if you like highrises you can look at all the beautiful commieblocks surrounding the city while you're in a dense downtown area which in itself has a lot more to offer compared to Seattles, which mostly contains office buildings and gets pretty dead after dark.

Also Stockholm isn't very expensive, these last 10 years the swedish economy has declined drastically and is cheap compared to the rest of Western Europe. Los Angeles for example is twice as expensive at pretty much everything, from rent to groceries.
 
Old 12-29-2010, 04:58 AM
 
Location: Sweden
22,868 posts, read 64,904,878 times
Reputation: 17823
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsimms3 View Post
I don't think I need to explain myself there BigSwede. Hötorgsskraporna and sergels torg give off those vibes. I actually like Sergels Square, and I don't know the names of individual commie blocks, but once you get out of the center city, they are everywhere just like they are in many European cities.
You do need to explain,because I don't understand what is so communistic about Hötorgsskraporna.
American cities also have lots of equal looking buildings outside the city center.
Does that mean that american suburbs is communistic?
 
Old 12-29-2010, 05:08 AM
 
5,816 posts, read 9,775,569 times
Reputation: 4492
Basically anywhere to avoid those taxes, brutal winters, and leftist ideologies.

And, more and more, brutal immigrant thugs and islamists, especially in Rosengarden near Gothenburg.
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