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Old 09-04-2009, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,439,916 times
Reputation: 838

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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
Actually, I'm right. By your own source, it mentions that Pittsburgh lost a total of 2,967 people between 2007 and 2008 (the most recent years mentioned). There were approximately 24,000 births and 27,000 deaths...let me see...that's about 3000 people lost....my goodness Pittsburgh lost a total of 3000 people that year!

Two extra things to point out. (1) My previous statements to which you were retorting to were in the context of Pittsburgh's recent population loss; so don't pretend like old numbers have any bearing on this conversation.
(2) Your citation is not telling the whole story, as the numbers don't even add up. To be more precise, it says that we lost 2777 people in deaths (that there were 2777 more death in the MSA than births); then it claims that we lost 708 people in net in/out migration...which should yield a total 3483 missing from the Pittsburgh MSA. However, your source says that only 2,967 people were lost.

This strange discrepancy doesn't really matter though as I'm still right...most of our population loss was through higher death rates relative to birth rates. And the point of all this was: that Pittsburgh is turning the corner; people aren't fleeing the city in droves anymore.
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Old 09-04-2009, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,240,148 times
Reputation: 1164
Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
Actually, I'm right. By your own source, it mentions that Pittsburgh lost a total of 2,967 people between 2007 and 2008 (the most recent years mentioned). There were approximately 24,000 births and 27,000 deaths...let me see...that's about 3000 people lost....my goodness Pittsburgh lost a total of 3000 people that year!

Two extra things to point out. (1) My previous statements to which you were retorting to were in the context of Pittsburgh's recent population loss; so don't pretend like old numbers have any bearing on this conversation.
(2) Your citation is not telling the whole story, as the numbers don't even add up. To be more precise, it says that we lost 2777 people in deaths (that there were 2777 more death in the MSA than births); then it claims that we lost 708 people in net in/out migration...which should yield a total 3483 missing from the Pittsburgh MSA. However, your source says that only 2,967 people were lost.

This strange discrepancy doesn't really matter though as I'm still right...most of our population loss was through higher death rates relative to birth rates. And the point of all this was: that Pittsburgh is turning the corner; people aren't fleeing the city in droves anymore.
so, the previous 7 yrs dont count?

or the decade before that?
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Old 09-04-2009, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,439,916 times
Reputation: 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
so, the previous 7 yrs dont count?

or the decade before that?
Um no...I don't think you get the point.

The point from the beginning is that Pittsburgh's current population decline has nothing to do with people fleeing the city in droves.
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Old 09-04-2009, 07:36 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,583 posts, read 20,456,271 times
Reputation: 9077
Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
Um no...I don't think you get the point.

The point from the beginning is that Pittsburgh's current population decline has nothing to do with people fleeing the city in droves.
I think both the cities of Pittsburgh and Cincinnati and Louisville's old city limits are seeing gains in income and percent of college graduates even as they continue losing population (or staying the same in Cincy's case). I don't know spefically about Cincy and da Burgh, but the neighborhoods losing population in Louisville are places that people shouldn't have to live in anyway (high murder rates and terrible air pollution). The nice neighborhoods have steady populations.
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Old 09-04-2009, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,400 posts, read 19,038,260 times
Reputation: 11043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision-Quest View Post
All three cities are along the Ohio River and have beautiful hill sides and surroundings. Which one is your favorite?
Pittsburgh...hard to beat the Golden Triangle.
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Old 09-04-2009, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville,Florida
3,772 posts, read 9,357,165 times
Reputation: 1979
As much as I like Louisville,Pittsburgh is the most impressive,especially on the southbank looking onto downtown. I love the Duquesne incline that goes up Mount Washington.I love the confluence that forms the Ohio River that flows through these two other cities.
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Old 08-29-2011, 01:11 PM
 
37 posts, read 87,832 times
Reputation: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
I'm pretty sure U of Cincinnati and U of Louisville are incomparable to University of Pittsburgh Medical.



Our economy is not great, but I don't think it is easily the worst of the three...especially since it is the biggest. The idea that our economy is in shambles is a total myth that people across the country mistakenly believe. The reason for our population decline has nothing to do with "people leaving in droves" because of the horrific job situation. In the 1980s Pittsburgh lost 150,000 steel jobs. Today, Pittsburgh has one of the highest retention rates of its young people of any major city. However, since we lost so many young people in the 80s (and therefore their children), we have more people dying than being born--a phenomenon that will soon be corrected.
fanboy, lol. Pittsburgh economy is definitely the worst....
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Old 08-29-2011, 01:16 PM
 
Location: East End of Pittsburgh
747 posts, read 1,025,961 times
Reputation: 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by thomaspickles View Post
fanboy, lol. Pittsburgh economy is definitely the worst....

Actually it is the best!
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Old 08-29-2011, 02:36 PM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,337,835 times
Reputation: 4306
Quote:
Originally Posted by adam.g.harpool View Post
Three frigid, declining Rust Belt cities, yay :-)

Let's see...I live in Pittsburgh currently and have not become a huge fan of the place even though there are lots of good things to say about the area. Whether deserved or not, Cincinnati has a reputation of being somewhat backwards politically and a tad racist. I've visited there before and wasn't particularly impressed. Louisville is a nicely laid out, progressive city and probably has the best economy out of all three, but it's attached to Kentucky.

So I would say...Pittsburgh, if I had to choose from that group. But really "none of the above!"
It is not deserved. It is total BS. Maybe the establishment/those with the power structure there might be somewhat backwards or a tad racist, sure, but in terms of the people themselves, lets just say there are some great racially integrated neighborhoods as well as world class cultural amenities, etc, etc.

Cincy has one of the oldest and still a very active Jewish community. The majority (non-Orthodox) of Jews tend to be rather progressive and embracing of diversty. (As those who were mistreated minorities generally are), and although Appalachians have been known to backward, they were a discriminated and disadvantaged group in midwestern cities, and when a group is like that, they can sometimes relate very well to other groups in the same boat.

In Cincinnati, the Appalachian migrants in some respects were almost like white black people.

It is cities that are known for their highly localized ethnic neighborhoods where you actually see some of the least interaction with other ethnic groups.
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Old 08-29-2011, 05:26 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
12,994 posts, read 17,113,637 times
Reputation: 14300
Quote:
Originally Posted by thomaspickles View Post
fanboy, lol. Pittsburgh economy is definitely the worst....
Oh Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowedreally[/url] now?

MSA unemployment rate (June 2011)
7.4% - Pittsburgh
9.2% - Cincinnati
9.5% - Louisville

Year-over-year job growth percentage (June 2010-June 2011)
1.25% - Pittsburgh
0.92% - Cincinnati
0.78% - Louisville

Year-over-year income growth percentage (2009-2010)
3.4% - Pittsburgh
3.2% - Louisville
2.6% - Cincinnati

Oops! Looks like you're wrong!

Last edited by Yac; 01-24-2012 at 05:42 AM..
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