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Old 08-21-2008, 07:02 PM
 
Location: RVA
2,418 posts, read 4,105,015 times
Reputation: 1189

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Quote:
Originally Posted by beenaround View Post
I am a native of western Maryland, which is in Appalachia. I have been and lived in the surrounding areas of Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and those areas are defintely Appalachian too. I actually find your postings quite rude. You want to go down and take pictures of the poverty and show them to everyone? There aren't any poor areas in Michigan or the midwest to take pictures of? What if I posted pictures of the worst areas of Youngstown, Cleveland, or Detriot and said it represented the midwest?
Better yet, why not go to Gary, IN and take pictures of the "ghetto- leroys"?

Before anybody reports me for "racism", allow me to point out the fact that I just used the nearest black equivalent to "hillbilly".

"Poor white trash" is the last ethnic group in the country that it's cool to laugh at/treat like animals in a zoo. See "Cletus the Slack-Jawed Yokel" on The Simpsons and just try to imagine him as any other color.

BTW, for the OP...go anywhere there was/is a coal-mining industry. I'm sure you'll find what you're looking for.
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Old 08-21-2008, 07:26 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,136 posts, read 21,121,261 times
Reputation: 23163
I have really enjoyed this thread. I feel that I got to know some of the posters better and now know why I feel so close to some of them. I think poverty is a term that is used by those who do not understand proper values.

I noticed Ashe County and part of Wilkes County, NC, on the income chart of the map. How much a person makes has nothing to do with whether they are rich or poor. In my opinion this area is one of the richest in the nation in friendship and human values. I heard several mentions of stiff upper lip and proud heritage. These people are the backbone of America. These were my ancestors and my parents. My dad started out a sharecropper and accumulated more than 150 acres and enough money for my mother to take care of herself for more then 25 years after his death. Not in high style, but she never went hungry. And when someone mentioned to her that she could get food stamps, her answer was that she didn't need the government to take care of her. She could take care of herself and had a garden until she died a week before her 85th birthday. You can't buy good food like that with food stamps.

The rest of the United States could learn a lot from these good Christian people. Check the crime rate of some of these places. Ashe County's crime rate has gone up considerably since the influx of many mega houses. Years ago I was reading one of the North Carolina fact books and one of the statements in the book still sticks in my mind. I wish I knew where I read it.

The statement was that Ashe County, NC, had the lowest income and the highest standard of living of any county in NC. The last time I checked, this was no longer true, but it was when I was a child. The county was full of very conservative people who spent their money wisely. If I won the lottery and could choose anywhere to live in NC it would probably be in Ashe County, NC far above the New River. The far above comes from the fact that the New River can have flash floods when it rains a lot in the mountains. I would like to see it, but I don't want to be too near it.

If you are looking for real proverty, look at the center of New York and Chicago, etc.
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Old 08-21-2008, 08:30 PM
 
5,419 posts, read 8,201,788 times
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Thank you so much for reminding us that income does not equal quality of life.
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Old 08-21-2008, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Middleton, Wisconsin
4,229 posts, read 15,065,444 times
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If there are folks in poverty in Appalachia then they have very rich souls because there living in one of the most beautiful places on earth... Ya really can't beat some of the views from the Appalachian Mountains... The folks in poverty are usually the ones who will go the extra mile to help that stranger out.. It's sad, but true.


So where there may not be money there may be rich souls, nonetheless.
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Old 08-21-2008, 09:04 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 57,213,700 times
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video from my recent applachian trip 2 weeks ago. Around Cutshin Kentucky.
The town was named after a coal miner cut his shin.
just click below
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Old 08-21-2008, 09:12 PM
 
Location: RVA
2,418 posts, read 4,105,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
video from my recent applachian trip 2 weeks ago. Around Cutshin Kentucky.
The town was named after a coal miner cut his shin.
just click below

Growing up in Virginia, I always loved the Appalachians, and kind of wanted to live there, but also wanted to live in a bigger city. Imagine my surprise when I discovered Pittsburgh!
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Old 08-21-2008, 09:15 PM
 
204 posts, read 655,346 times
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Probably deep, deep, deep, deep into West Virginia or Kentucky over an hour from any interstates.
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Old 08-21-2008, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Middleton, Wisconsin
4,229 posts, read 15,065,444 times
Reputation: 2279
love the video SunnyKayak!
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Old 08-22-2008, 06:06 AM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 57,213,700 times
Reputation: 14868
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoshB View Post
love the video SunnyKayak!
Thanks I hope to go back this autumn when the leaves are changing it's fabolous views. The video within the mountains is Lynch Mountain and it is very high and loads of hair pin curves which didnt capture to well on video.
There is this one curve if you look in your side mirror you can see the rear bumper.
During the winter months even though it can be tretcherous to drive due to inclimate weather or fog but the 1 story size icicles on the rocks are amazing.
I agree with above posters the people there are happy who they are and the way they are living they get by with what they have and take care of it. When you provide what you need to be happy there never this yearning to have what other have that are higher income brackets at least they have less debt to their counter parts.

The people are amazingly friendly. I stood outside of a store and I am not one to start up conversation but the people there do. They will talk about anything with you...it amazing. I had this one guy come to talk about my car which is a Toyota. Not to many people own one in that area they own Ford, Chevy's or GMC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by creepsinc View Post
Growing up in Virginia, I always loved the Appalachians, and kind of wanted to live there, but also wanted to live in a bigger city. Imagine my surprise when I discovered Pittsburgh!
I read the amish population is on the increase
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Old 08-22-2008, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Red Land High School
347 posts, read 1,032,557 times
Reputation: 129
The Anthracite Coal Region in Pennsylvania is very economically depressed. There is a lot of poverty in that area of Appalachia.
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