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Old 12-08-2009, 03:11 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,853,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
By some stats, Charlotte has already passed Indianapolis.

In 2006, Indy's MSA had 1,666,032 people. That same year, Indy's CSA had 1,984,644 people.
Indiana census statistical areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In 2006, Charlotte's MSA had 1,583,016 people. That same year, Charlotte's CSA had 2,191,604 people.
North Carolina census statistical areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I haven't taken the time to look up the lastest estimates for Indy yet, but I do know that Charlotte's MSA has grown to 1.7 million in just 3 years. I have my doubts that Indy has done the same (but I could be wrong).
The 2008 stats have the Indianapolis MSA at 1,715,459 and the CSA at 2,035,327. And of course, Charlotte's MSA is 1,701,799 and CSA 2,338,289. Indy's 2008 estimated UA is 1,279,119 and Charlotte's is 952,806. I know that last stat doesn't really mean anything to you, but it gives part (not all) of the picture.
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:54 PM
 
4,675 posts, read 7,811,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
The 2008 stats have the Indianapolis MSA at 1,715,459 and the CSA at 2,035,327. And of course, Charlotte's MSA is 1,701,799 and CSA 2,338,289. Indy's 2008 estimated UA is 1,279,119 and Charlotte's is 952,806. I know that last stat doesn't really mean anything to you, but it gives part (not all) of the picture.
With Indy having an UA of almost 3ook more people, is this a significant difference? Just curious.
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:02 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,853,318 times
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I'd say so, but I wouldn't be surprised if most of that difference was in the outer suburbs.
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:25 PM
 
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I see what you're saying. I wonder how many in Indy and Charlotte live in the center city and surrounding neighborhoods. I think this would be another gauge urbanity between the two.
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:34 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
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I guess you'd have to look at Census tracts to find that info. Not sure how to look that up though.
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Old 12-08-2009, 11:00 PM
 
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I know there are stats around this forum somewhere of uptown stats. I guess if you looked up stats for the zip codes of Southend, NoDa, Midtown-Charlottetowne, and various places you could probably figure it out. After exams I can figure this out. But definitely not now. Sheesh!
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Old 12-10-2009, 01:04 PM
 
6,249 posts, read 9,658,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
The 2008 stats have the Indianapolis MSA at 1,715,459 and the CSA at 2,035,327. And of course, Charlotte's MSA is 1,701,799 and CSA 2,338,289. Indy's 2008 estimated UA is 1,279,119 and Charlotte's is 952,806. I know that last stat doesn't really mean anything to you, but it gives part (not all) of the picture.
You are correct! It doesn't mean that much to me and I'll explain why. When it comes to cities such as Chicago, NYC, Boston etc etc, that number says a lot. However, midsized major cities' (like Charlotte, Indy, Columbus etc) UAs are determined moreso by the number of freeway exits within close proximity of town (freeway development is hardly urban in most cases). In Charlotte's case, the "urbanized area" will skyrocket thanks to new freeway exits being added to the city (I-485). Yes, there are townhomes near I-485, yet they are located in VERY suburban areas.

Cities like Indy and Columbus had their freeway loops much longer than Charlotte. Development followed those loops and created a city with a more concentrated population (on paper). The age of a city has a lot to do with this too, but in the case of Charlotte vs Indy it has more to do with freeway infrastructure than anything else. I have driven around many midwestern cities, and Charlotte seems soooooo much more like Indy and Columbus than Cincy and Cleveland. Charlotte is well within Cincy's league, but Cincy really looks like a northeastern town. With a UA of only 1.5 million, Cincy still feels more urban and city-like than Denver (a city with a UA of nearly 2 million). This is why I have very little respect for UA numbers. There is NO substitute for seeing a city in person.
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Old 12-10-2009, 03:27 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 17,811,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adavi215 View Post
I know there are stats around this forum somewhere of uptown stats. I guess if you looked up stats for the zip codes of Southend, NoDa, Midtown-Charlottetowne, and various places you could probably figure it out. After exams I can figure this out. But definitely not now. Sheesh!
Quote:
The area, bounded by I-77, the John Belk and Brookshire Freeways (the I-277 loop), is further broken down into four wards, separated by Tryon Street and Trade Street. Of them, First, Third, and Fourth Wards are primarily residential areas. The Second Ward is made up primarily of city and county government offices. The current residential population of Uptown Charlotte is approximately 11,000.
Charlotte center city - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-10-2009, 04:15 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,853,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
You are correct! It doesn't mean that much to me and I'll explain why. When it comes to cities such as Chicago, NYC, Boston etc etc, that number says a lot. However, midsized major cities' (like Charlotte, Indy, Columbus etc) UAs are determined moreso by the number of freeway exits within close proximity of town (freeway development is hardly urban in most cases). In Charlotte's case, the "urbanized area" will skyrocket thanks to new freeway exits being added to the city (I-485). Yes, there are townhomes near I-485, yet they are located in VERY suburban areas.
Yes, urbanized area figures cover suburban areas also, if the population density in those areas is above a certain threshold. But your theory about the number of freeway exits is...interesting, but I'm not sure if a strict correlation exists. Now I've not been to Austin, but just by looking at a map, it appears as though it doesn't have more freeway exists in the general area than Charlotte (especially since it only has one interstate going through it compared to Charlotte's two), yet it has a higher UA population. On a more local level, Greensboro has more freeway exits than Winston-Salem, but Winston's UA population is 50K more than Greensboro's. There are a few other examples also. Furthermore, every American city these days has sprawled at its edges. After thinking about it, I think the difference between the figures for Charlotte and Indianapolis may lie in the urban core and first-ring suburbs. Looking at how much larger Indianapolis was than Charlotte up to 1970 (which is when Indianapolis consolidated with Marion County) leads me to believe that. The city of Indianapolis had 100K+ residents in 1890; it would be another 50 years until Charlotte could say the same. So I'd be willing to say that much of the difference in urbanized areas in this case really does come down to Indianapolis have denser populations in more urban areas than Charlotte.
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Old 12-10-2009, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
2,103 posts, read 3,167,386 times
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Battle of two boring landlocked cities IMO...but I'll give the edge to Charlotte.
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