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Old 02-03-2013, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
1,576 posts, read 2,409,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThroatGuzzler View Post
SF, Denver, Seattle and LA i'd assume.
Its definitely not LA. Don't let the media fool you. The average Angelino sounds like Cheech Marin, LOL. LA has many distinct accents.
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Old 02-04-2013, 08:50 AM
 
2,195 posts, read 2,155,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Des Moines and Omaha are closer to neutral territory. Kansas City is not neutral.
Except, of course, they have essentially the same "accent" with only minor, and rapidly disappearing, differences that only a trained linguist studying very minute phonemic differences that 99.9% of native english speakers would not register as different.

Other than that...yes, Kansas City accents are is IN NO WAY NEUTRAL, they are just "almost identical to neutral".
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Old 02-05-2013, 03:47 PM
 
Location: MD suburbs of DC
607 posts, read 1,039,424 times
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Yeah, Des Moines and Omaha do come to mind.
Also, this has probably been posted, but check out this map. American English Dialects
The golden hatched area is the closest to General American.
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Old 05-26-2013, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
712 posts, read 1,808,437 times
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Many places in the Midwest come close, but I don't think they are the MOST neutral. I do have a Master's in English and took a lot of sociolinguistic courses (I'm not just basing this solely on opinion), and most people I encounter from the Bay Area seem to have no marked accent that I can detect. I have moved around many times and reduced my own accent in the process, and Bay Area people still sound the clearest to me. Places like central Ohio or Nebraska are also very clear but can sometimes have a nasal sound and the way vowels are pronounced can be modified from the "standard".

Just my observations.
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Old 05-26-2013, 11:16 AM
 
Location: SoCal
1,820 posts, read 1,822,895 times
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Most progressive cities don't have a main accent.
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Old 05-26-2013, 12:15 PM
 
Location: IN
20,210 posts, read 34,567,338 times
Reputation: 12555
Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
Except, of course, they have essentially the same "accent" with only minor, and rapidly disappearing, differences that only a trained linguist studying very minute phonemic differences that 99.9% of native english speakers would not register as different.

Other than that...yes, Kansas City accents are is IN
NO WAY NEUTRAL, they are just "almost identical to neutral".
No, disagree. Until you lived further north you wouldn't notice the southern influences of speech patterns in Kansas city. I notice it much more when I visit.
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Old 05-26-2013, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,621 posts, read 11,204,643 times
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NYC. All you other people talk wrong.
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Old 04-04-2017, 09:38 PM
 
4,801 posts, read 3,465,243 times
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Every major city in the country because of moving patterns. Generally the more popular the city, the flatter the accents. However here are some that stand out to me:

DC
Atlanta
Charleston (unless you're Black or old)
Savannah (see above)
Indianapolis
Columbus
Kansas City on the Kansas side especially
Omaha
Des Moines
Austin
Dallas
New York (see Charleston and Savannah and add Puerto Rican to the list as people who have accents)
Cincinnati (unless you're over 40)
Most of Florida except Miami where they sound very Spanish inspired and Jacksonville where they sound mildly Southern

Californians love to think they don't sound distinctive but they do in their own quirky way. In Seattle people sound rather "neutral" but slightly California/Canadian. Out west people say milk like melk but of course they don't hear it on themselves because to them melk sounds like malk.
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Old 04-04-2017, 09:42 PM
 
4,801 posts, read 3,465,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
Many places in the Midwest come close, but I don't think they are the MOST neutral. I do have a Master's in English and took a lot of sociolinguistic courses (I'm not just basing this solely on opinion), and most people I encounter from the Bay Area seem to have no marked accent that I can detect. I have moved around many times and reduced my own accent in the process, and Bay Area people still sound the clearest to me. Places like central Ohio or Nebraska are also very clear but can sometimes have a nasal sound and the way vowels are pronounced can be modified from the "standard".

Just my observations.
American accents are in fact nasal and many non-Americans notice this about us. Midwesterners sounding nasal in no way makes them non distinct.

Now unless you mean Cleveland or Cincinnati (lesser extent) most of Ohio isn't super nasal. Cleveland has an "accent" that deviates from standard as does Cincinnati of old. Youngstown probably has the most distinct accent. Ok, I guess Ohioans are nasal to an extent lol
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Old 04-04-2017, 10:34 PM
 
266 posts, read 186,016 times
Reputation: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
American accents are in fact nasal and many non-Americans notice this about us. Midwesterners sounding nasal in no way makes them non distinct.

Now unless you mean Cleveland or Cincinnati (lesser extent) most of Ohio isn't super nasal. Cleveland has an "accent" that deviates from standard as does Cincinnati of old. Youngstown probably has the most distinct accent. Ok, I guess Ohioans are nasal to an extent lol

Maybe they just need to use some nasal spray to clear up their sinuses. LOL.
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