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Old 06-21-2009, 02:26 AM
 
1,263 posts, read 3,458,448 times
Reputation: 610

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Completely agree.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CMDallas View Post
Aww, don't worry... I'm Chinese and have a rough idea of what it feels like...sorta...not really... I live in a pretty "Asian" area...
Well, assuming you are Chinese.
There several options:
Houston, is quiet cheap (compared to NYC and LA) and has a large Asian population. Sugarland in particular has a huge Chinese population.
Dallas, particularly Plano and Richardson (suburbs) have high concentrations of Chinese immigrants.
These areas are also Cheaper.
Austin, recently introduced a Chinatown, although I don't know much about the Chinese population there.
Chicago has a Chinatown, however I think the area it is around is pretty expensive.
Seattle is basically like Chicago except not just Chinese, it has strong Vietnamese and Japanese influence.

If your looking for just high asian populations in general and are growing very rapidly... I'll put the asian populations which is strongest there...in cheaper cities
Minneapolis St. Paul- Hmong, Khmer, Lao, Vietnamese
Chicago- Filipino, Chinese - I don't know too much, but I know it has a huge Filipino population.
Dallas Fort Worth- Korean, Chinese, South Asian, Vietnamese (The Koreans make a huge presence are are numbered to be 100,000 in the metropolitan area within the next 10 years, also I believe this is the 4th Largest metropolitan area in term of Vietnamese only beaten by the Bay Area, Los Angeles, and Houston, one of the largest numbers of Lao and Khmer here in the US)
Houston- Chinese, Vietnamese, South Asian -Has a huge Vietnamese and Chinese presence, they coexist very well and many times they will intermarry within a blink of an eye, they blend very well so it will not be uncommon to see a vietnamese business in a Chinese enclave.
Seattle-Vietnamese, Khmer, and Chinese - (HUGELY vietnamese and much like Houston will blend, although all the asians tend to concentrate on the one asian enclave which each fights over... IE: The chinese want it to be Called Chinatown, the Vietnamese Little Saigon, etc)
Austin- Chinese (Has a Chinatown with a chinese population, I don't know too much other then that Chinese like Collegetowns for some dumb reason which may be the reason the population grew as it the city did too)
Atlanta- Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese - The asian population is growing fast, and they all have this one area of town where everything is mixed with everything (IE: a CHinese bakery next to a Korean video shop) The Vietnamese population number at about 20,000 and makes it the 10 largest Vietnamese metropolitan area.



I'll give you what I know on Texas, I'm too lazy to tell you anything else...
Dallas and Houston
Houston (including Sugarland) has a high Chinese, Vietnamese, and South Asian population, strong enclaves can be found. Mostly Chinese, Vietnamese, and Indian.
Dallas (specifically: Plano, Richardson, Carrollton, Irving, Arlington, Garland, and Coppell) has a high Korean, Vietnamese, South Asian, Khmer, Lao, and Chinese. have high asian concentrations and have several enclaves throughout the city mostly Korean, Vietnamese, Chinese, and Indian). There are only 4 strong enclaves serving the Metropolitan area however, and they're not like NYC.
2 are Vietnamese, one is Korean, the other Chinese. However, the asian population is smaller then houston and the groups are more equally divided so it's not all Chinese and Vietnamese like it is in Houston. IF you are Chinese I would go to one of these three suburbs: Sugarland, Plano, or Richardson
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Old 06-21-2009, 04:24 PM
 
3,277 posts, read 4,496,711 times
Reputation: 1908
Quote:
Originally Posted by james310 View Post
I stumbled across this thread today while searching for recommendations on affordable U.S. cities that are likely to pull out this recession faster job-wise than other cities and that have decent quality of life for all (less crime, discrimination and hatred against minority groups - racial/ethnic/orientation/religious, progressive, cultured, rich in arts, etc.). Tall order, I know. The abundance of helpful suggestions/info got me reading this thread from beginning to end but what compelled me to register and add my two cents (even though this topic may be old and dead by now) is the undercurrent topic: prevalence of overt and covert racism and intolerance towards minority groups in many U.S. cities today and it's negative impact on quality of life for its' citizens and U.S. stature among nations. To head-off any undue presumptions, I grew up in a blue collar all-white suburb of Chicago, lived in Philadelphia, near Atlanta, near St. Louis, Tacoma and Salt Lake City for short periods and have lived in California for the past 15 years, served the country as an Army Reserve officer for 10 years, I am conservative on some issues and liberal on others, I have a very diverse set of friends (age, race/ethnicity, orientation), others tell me that I'm outgoing, assertive, courteous and easy to like, I consider myself as apple-pie American as any other American, and I happen to be Asian by racial status. I am sympathetic to leaana's comments and what she is trying to find. I have had similar experiences outside of California, more so in the past, less so recently but definitely not rare. Much more overt in the past and mostly covert in recent times. And I too have come across similar reactions from people when I have voiced my experiences: surprise, denial, and sometimes anger that turned into ad hominem attacks (e.g. "I never heard of others who had your negative experiences, maybe there's something wrong with you", "maybe you're just being overly sensitive", "maybe people are reacting to your negative behavior", etc.). I've learned to tread very carefully on this topic and to not even voice it with people who are not ready to hear it with benefit of the doubt and objectivity. Leaana, I admire your courage to speak up unflinchingly. Ignoring it, denying it, or dismissing things you haven't experienced directly does not make a fact a non-fact. It's real, it happens to people of minority groups and it's not their fault. My self-doubt and second-guessing in what I was experiencing was alleviated when I moved to California. I was the same person and my behavior had not changed but I no longer encountered the types of negative reactions that I encountered in other places. Initially, it was disorienting. People seemed to be unusually nice to me. Eventually I realized that people were just treating the same way they treated everybody else. For the first time in my life, non-Asian females were openly showing interest in me and for the first time in my life I began dating outside of my race. When my friends who still live in Chicago area visited me in California for the first time, they went through the same initially disorientation. They would ask again and again, what's going on, how come everybody is so nice to me. Keep your chin up leaana. Cities with good quality of life for all do exist in U.S., very few though it may be. Due to the job market and cost of living in California, I'm now considering Seattle (I've become very partial to being near the ocean and mountains) and possibly Dallas.
Yeah, I agree. People stereotype and generalise freely, and some even do it believing that they are being accommodating. It's so strange to actually be treated like everyone else that it almost makes you paranoid of a person's intentions if you aren't used to it.
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Old 06-26-2009, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,704 posts, read 34,739,835 times
Reputation: 9242
Quote:
Originally Posted by jman650 View Post
But then you'll have to be surrounded by people who constantly monitor whatever the US does and then spend their days criticizing it. You'll also be dealing with uptight, overly-proud Canadians who have an exaggerated sense of self-worth. I'm sure there are plenty of wonderful Canadians too who don't fit this description, but I've been unfortunate enough to almost exclusively come across the type I just mentioned. Plus I hear their free health care sucks and is free for a reason. Crime is definitely exponentially lower though, and the Asian communities do sound nice.
That's EXACTLY my only problem with Canada. I like the politics and I like the high Asian populations.

But UNFORTUNATELY, you have to deal with some of the most obnoxious, loud, self-righteously egotistically proud, hypocritical, myth-making, self-back-patting people on the planet.
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Old 06-26-2009, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,704 posts, read 34,739,835 times
Reputation: 9242
Quote:
Originally Posted by james310 View Post
I stumbled across this thread today while searching for recommendations on affordable U.S. cities that are likely to pull out this recession faster job-wise than other cities and that have decent quality of life for all (less crime, discrimination and hatred against minority groups - racial/ethnic/orientation/religious, progressive, cultured, rich in arts, etc.). Tall order, I know. The abundance of helpful suggestions/info got me reading this thread from beginning to end but what compelled me to register and add my two cents (even though this topic may be old and dead by now) is the undercurrent topic: prevalence of overt and covert racism and intolerance towards minority groups in many U.S. cities today and it's negative impact on quality of life for its' citizens and U.S. stature among nations. To head-off any undue presumptions, I grew up in a blue collar all-white suburb of Chicago, lived in Philadelphia, near Atlanta, near St. Louis, Tacoma and Salt Lake City for short periods and have lived in California for the past 15 years, served the country as an Army Reserve officer for 10 years, I am conservative on some issues and liberal on others, I have a very diverse set of friends (age, race/ethnicity, orientation), others tell me that I'm outgoing, assertive, courteous and easy to like, I consider myself as apple-pie American as any other American, and I happen to be Asian by racial status. I am sympathetic to leaana's comments and what she is trying to find. I have had similar experiences outside of California, more so in the past, less so recently but definitely not rare. Much more overt in the past and mostly covert in recent times. And I too have come across similar reactions from people when I have voiced my experiences: surprise, denial, and sometimes anger that turned into ad hominem attacks (e.g. "I never heard of others who had your negative experiences, maybe there's something wrong with you", "maybe you're just being overly sensitive", "maybe people are reacting to your negative behavior", etc.). I've learned to tread very carefully on this topic and to not even voice it with people who are not ready to hear it with benefit of the doubt and objectivity. Leaana, I admire your courage to speak up unflinchingly. Ignoring it, denying it, or dismissing things you haven't experienced directly does not make a fact a non-fact. It's real, it happens to people of minority groups and it's not their fault. My self-doubt and second-guessing in what I was experiencing was alleviated when I moved to California. I was the same person and my behavior had not changed but I no longer encountered the types of negative reactions that I encountered in other places. Initially, it was disorienting. People seemed to be unusually nice to me. Eventually I realized that people were just treating the same way they treated everybody else. For the first time in my life, non-Asian females were openly showing interest in me and for the first time in my life I began dating outside of my race. When my friends who still live in Chicago area visited me in California for the first time, they went through the same initially disorientation. They would ask again and again, what's going on, how come everybody is so nice to me. Keep your chin up leaana. Cities with good quality of life for all do exist in U.S., very few though it may be. Due to the job market and cost of living in California, I'm now considering Seattle (I've become very partial to being near the ocean and mountains) and possibly Dallas.
This is actually a REALLY good post, just difficult to read because it isn't in paragraph form.

I've just re-read the entire thread from start to finish. Actually, from the very beginning, I think it is because Leaana is in NORTH CAROLINA. Granted I don't personally know North Carolina, but I've read others experiences there, and it seems to go on and on with UN-welcomeness against immigrants. It seems they've also tried to pass laws making it as hard as possible for immigrants, etc. I personally think that despite its 'oh, it is now an OKAY state' to live in, has brought people to there, and finding out it isn't an okay state to live in.

Personally, having lived around the country, from Michigan to Arizona to Minnesota to Oregon to New York to California...(and internationally)...each state is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT from each other. I mean, the vibe you get in Oregon is NOTHING like that in New York. The vibe in Michigan is NOTHING like in California. Literally EVERYTHING is just a little bit different in every conceivable way.

So, personally, I think Leaana just needs to get out of North Carolina. I've met the kind of people she mentions, so I know they exist, but I've VERY VERY FEW of them anywhere out WEST.

The beauty of America, is that you can be born in one place, move to another state, and find your niche there. With 50 states, and pretty much 50+ different cultures/mindsets just on the 'state' level, you have a lot of choices. To assume ALL 50 are exactly the same, is a REALLY BAD ASSUMPTION though.
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Old 06-26-2009, 09:01 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,548 posts, read 17,912,885 times
Reputation: 10691
haven't read the entire thread but offer this city: Cupertino, California
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Old 07-08-2009, 06:19 AM
 
371 posts, read 811,096 times
Reputation: 94
hi guys how about Phoenix metro in AZ? many asian there? houses are really cheap there so thinking about moving there..but don't know much about the area. If there ain't many asians there...how do the locals take us asians? and what are some area that got mostly asians in Phoenix metro? thanks
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Old 07-08-2009, 04:07 PM
 
Location: East side - Metro ATL
1,325 posts, read 2,117,604 times
Reputation: 1197
I know you said no to Atlanta, but you should give Duluth, GA a second look. Take a stroll on Pleasant Hill Road and you will feel right at home. Trust me, the Asian population in Atlanta is exploding.

As I mentioned before, Pleasant Hill is turning into an area for Asians with many Asian businesses opening up in that area.
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Old 07-19-2009, 08:41 PM
 
11 posts, read 27,188 times
Reputation: 18
Irvine in orange county, CA has many asians and many of them are middle to upper middle class.
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Old 07-20-2009, 02:28 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,260,404 times
Reputation: 6657
Cities in California and Hawaii would be the obvious picks. There are also several towns and cities in New Jersey with large East Asian populations. ("Asian" often seems to mean "East or Southeast Asian")

http://www.city-data.com/top2/h71.html

Westminster and Daly City in California are some of the biggest places for Southeast Asians I find. I read Westminster is known for its Vietnamese community. Although San Jose and Honolulu seem to be the largest cities with substantial Southeast Asian populations. Springfield, Virginia seems to be the most Southeast Asian outside the Pacific region. It seems to be about 20% Asian overall.

http://www.city-data.com/top2/h86.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Springfield-Virginia.html


For Asian in general Edison, New Jersey and Dearborn, Michigan seem to be the largest outside the Pacific Rim. Edison appears to have a large population of South Asians while I believe Dearborn is known for Middle Easterners. Monterey Park, California seems to be the most Asian when including California and Hawaii.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Edison-New-Jersey.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Dearborn-Michigan.html
http://www.city-data.com/top2/h70.html
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Old 07-21-2010, 02:03 AM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,140,456 times
Reputation: 1178
I live just down the street from Westminster, CA and it seems that once you go under the freeway from Huntington Beach into the city limits its as if you are entering a semi-American version of Vietnam. Pretty crazy, plus they have little Saigon there.
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