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View Poll Results: Which Southern State Has the Strongest Southern Accent?
Alabama 57 20.00%
Mississippi 76 26.67%
Louisiana 23 8.07%
Georgia 27 9.47%
Florida 5 1.75%
Tennessee 22 7.72%
Texas 16 5.61%
North Carolina 12 4.21%
South Carolina 15 5.26%
Arkansas 13 4.56%
Kentucky 9 3.16%
Virginia 10 3.51%
Voters: 285. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-08-2009, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,758 posts, read 14,560,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 01va571 View Post
[About 80% of Kentucky tawlk like southerner's, but it seems more like Missouri lingo up and around Louisville. (There=Thurr, Here=Hurr)
I have never heard people talk like that around Louisville and I have lived inthis area most of my life.
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Old 05-23-2009, 11:58 AM
 
215 posts, read 357,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 01va571 View Post
Well......


About 80% of Kentucky tawlk like southerner's, but it seems more like Missouri lingo up and around Louisville. (There=Thurr, Here=Hurr)
I noticed that also. The African American population in Lousiville does sound very Lower Midwestern or St. Louis like with there general speach patterns. Memphis and parts of Texas say hurr and thurr, but they still have a strong southern drawl to there speech. I have also noticed that the AA's in DC tend to slur and use there R's frequently also (area=urea, carry=curry,lyrucs=lyrics, etc.)
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Old 05-23-2009, 12:08 PM
 
215 posts, read 357,521 times
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I don't know if anybody mentioned that the The African American population in Florida also has very very deep southern accents. Everybody I know from Florida (Miami) talks with some of the heaviest drawls I have ever heard. Rappers from the area include Trick Daddy, Plies..etc.

Here is an example of a strong Southside VA accent from Nascar driver Elliot Sadler, and his family.

YouTube - Hermie, Elliott and Bell Sadler
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Old 05-23-2009, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,380 posts, read 14,401,841 times
Reputation: 4990
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbank007 View Post
I noticed that also. The African American population in Lousiville does sound very Lower Midwestern or St. Louis like with there general speach patterns. Memphis and parts of Texas say hurr and thurr, but they still have a strong southern drawl to there speech. I have also noticed that the AA's in DC tend to slur and use there R's frequently also (area=urea, carry=curry,lyrucs=lyrics, etc.)
They sure do. It's little bit different than Dallas, Memphis, and rest of the region only because slur the r's longer. Whereas in Dallas, Memphis, North Louisiana, Arkansas, and St. Louis say it quickly.
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Old 05-23-2009, 02:33 PM
 
215 posts, read 357,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
They sure do. It's little bit different than Dallas, Memphis, and rest of the region only because slur the r's longer. Whereas in Dallas, Memphis, North Louisiana, Arkansas, and St. Louis say it quickly.
Yes I agree with you about the DC accent , and the long slurs versus the southern accent slurs. I found a video to show people how a dc accent sounds in the AA communities.


YouTube - Kingpin Slim "Game Tight" video


Watch from 3:08 through 3:17 to hear the typical DC slurs specifically
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Old 05-23-2009, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,383 posts, read 5,455,186 times
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The southern accent sounds strange lol
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Old 05-23-2009, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,380 posts, read 14,401,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbank007 View Post
Yes I agree with you about the DC accent , and the long slurs versus the southern accent slurs. I found a video to show people how a dc accent sounds in the AA communities.


YouTube - Kingpin Slim "Game Tight" video


Watch from 3:08 through 3:17 to hear the typical DC slurs specifically
You couldn't find a more perfect example than that. Props on the video. You can also here it in Wale's music as well.
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Old 05-23-2009, 06:23 PM
 
2,758 posts, read 3,349,853 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nycricanpapi View Post
The southern accent sounds strange lol
There isn't one type of accent down here. I'm from the A and I think some of my fellow Georgians sound strange. I lived in East TN from 02-08 and they they had a weird accent to me (along with parts of KY, southwest VA, and parts of NC). In my opinion the best Southern accents are NO, Savannah, Charleston, and maybe the VA Tidewater ones.
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Old 05-23-2009, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 19,329,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeaponsCollector View Post
Oh boy....The southern accent contest... from top of the south to the bottom.


Virginia

Northern Virginia has an accent like.......Maryland, Which is no accent at all. However, these ancient very lightish-southern accents (that used to exist) are still spoken by some people in the area, very little.

The Virginia Piedmont accent is a Old-South accent, that is highly ignored. It is non-rhotic meaning speakers pronounce an "R" if it is followed by a vowel. The funny thing about this accent is it has a history for having a strong influence on the south's speech patterns. It has a long history with the upper class aristocratic plantation class of the Old-South.

Let's see....If you were African American and were from the Tidewater area of Virginia. You'd be Disco Ballin


or trying to make it out of Richmond city.


For a Caucasian-Tidewater Virginian you would want to see Virgil Goode as someone posted before. (Funny)

For Southwest Virginia, West Virginia, and Eastern Kentucky it's a mountain accent, or Southern-Appalachian accent. Its funny because in that general area they kind of all blend in together.

West Virginia

Southern-Appalachian accent for sure, even in southern Ohio. It has some northern influences however. Like calling soda, POP. In Florida/Georgia it's always COKE.

Mountaineers speak with a scots-irish dialect, that dates back....like a long time ago.

North Carolina....

A thick Nawf Cackalacky accent


South Carolina
Like North Cackalacky, but not in english.

A Nawlin's (New Orleans) accent is actually called YAT. Which is almost identical to a Brooklyn accent in New York. Commonly called "Brooklyneese". Plus Louisiana is on the Creole/French hybrid accents and such. It's just not quite the same

Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Northern Florida (like Pensacola to Jacksonville) are the dixie-land supreme accent area.

A real Texas accent




Ok I give up, thats enough

my mom does that woo wee stuff lol
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Old 05-23-2009, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex
3,269 posts, read 5,268,745 times
Reputation: 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by WeaponsCollector View Post
Oh boy....The southern accent contest... from top of the south to the bottom.


Virginia

Northern Virginia has an accent like.......Maryland, Which is no accent at all. However, these ancient very lightish-southern accents (that used to exist) are still spoken by some people in the area, very little.

The Virginia Piedmont accent is a Old-South accent, that is highly ignored. It is non-rhotic meaning speakers pronounce an "R" if it is followed by a vowel. The funny thing about this accent is it has a history for having a strong influence on the south's speech patterns. It has a long history with the upper class aristocratic plantation class of the Old-South.

Let's see....If you were African American and were from the Tidewater area of Virginia. You'd be Disco Ballin


or trying to make it out of Richmond city.


For a Caucasian-Tidewater Virginian you would want to see Virgil Goode as someone posted before. (Funny)

For Southwest Virginia, West Virginia, and Eastern Kentucky it's a mountain accent, or Southern-Appalachian accent. Its funny because in that general area they kind of all blend in together.

West Virginia

Southern-Appalachian accent for sure, even in southern Ohio. It has some northern influences however. Like calling soda, POP. In Florida/Georgia it's always COKE.

Mountaineers speak with a scots-irish dialect, that dates back....like a long time ago.

North Carolina....

A thick Nawf Cackalacky accent


South Carolina
Like North Cackalacky, but not in english.

A Nawlin's (New Orleans) accent is actually called YAT. Which is almost identical to a Brooklyn accent in New York. Commonly called "Brooklyneese". Plus Louisiana is on the Creole/French hybrid accents and such. It's just not quite the same

Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Northern Florida (like Pensacola to Jacksonville) are the dixie-land supreme accent area.

A real Texas accent




Ok I give up, thats enough
I from Texas and I know I sound nothing like that! He sound straight country!!! He must be from West Texas.
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