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Unread 02-28-2009, 09:51 PM
 
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Default Southern Twang vs. Southern Drawl

What is the difference between these two dialects of the southern accents? Your responses and post will be greatly appreciated!
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Unread 02-28-2009, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Rome, Georgia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KE111691 View Post
What is the difference between these two dialects of the southern accents? Your responses and post will be greatly appreciated!
The bias of the listener's ear.

Last edited by Georgiafrog; 02-28-2009 at 09:53 PM.. Reason: Possessive punctuation
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Unread 02-28-2009, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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6 of one, 1/2 dozen of the other
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Unread 02-28-2009, 10:15 PM
 
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Real answers please! I have never heard of drawl and twang. I am trying to learn something here. Gosh!!
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Unread 03-01-2009, 06:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KE111691 View Post
Real answers please! I have never heard of drawl and twang. I am trying to learn something here. Gosh!!
KE, here is a good link on the subject:

Southern American English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I am not sure if this answers your question, but broadly speaking, a "drawl" is more common in the Deep or Lower South while a "twang" dominates in the Upper (Mountain) and Western South (i.e. western Texas and Oklahoma). I know enough about linguistics to say exactly what are the distinguishing characteristics, but I hazard a guess that one of them revolves around the "r" sound. In the Deep South, it tends to be "dropped" while it is distinctly pronounced in the Upper and western areas. I think that stereotypical "country music" sound is a good example of the latter.

Hope this might have helped a bit!
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Unread 03-01-2009, 08:58 AM
 
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Default Correction!

Quote:

I know enough about linguistics to say exactly what are the distinguishing characteristics
Correction here: I MEANT to say I DON'T KNOW enough about linguistics...!
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Unread 03-01-2009, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Richmond
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I think no matter what region of the South you're in- twangs are spoken much faster, and more nasal. Almost more like Northern accents in a way, and sharper to the ear. Drawls are softer and more elongated, like the figure of a lovely woman...


These two ladies have a Tidewater Virginia accent- which is much more classic Southern-drawl

Streaming Richmond | Richmond VA User Submitted Local Video Showcasing the Local Attractions, Businesses, Community, Entertainment, Festivals, Music, News, Sports and More in RVA (http://www.streamingrichmond.com/v/140,a-very-richmond-phone-call.html - broken link)

Now compare that to "Larry The Cable Guy". Theres the difference.

BTW- Country Music Singers can vary as well. Patsy Cline and Johnny Cash had drawls vs. Hank Williams Sr for example.
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Unread 03-02-2009, 05:28 PM
 
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A southern twang talker is Dolly Parton, right?
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Unread 03-02-2009, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Richmond
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KE111691 View Post
A southern twang talker is Dolly Parton, right?
Yes that would be closer. Because she talks more briskly and heavier on the R's.
Although her voice is not nasal to me.
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Unread 03-03-2009, 08:57 AM
 
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I'm going to take a shot at this. Take the question "How are you doing today?". To me someone with a twang would sound like they are saying "Heya dowin ta-die" (TN twang) and I say that the drawl sound like "Howerr you dooinngg todaayy". Basically the drawl emphasizes on the R's and the twang is that nasally "wasuuuupppp". To me, the twang has an A that (open A?) replaces most vowels like shoe turns in shae's, bike turns into bake. I really can't explain the twangy bike sound that well on here but it's close to sounding like bake. That's what I think of when I hear the twang and drawl.
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