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View Poll Results: What city would you most like to live in? Why?
Boston 57 10.27%
Chicago 90 16.22%
Dallas 43 7.75%
Houston 44 7.93%
Las Vegas 39 7.03%
Los Angeles 62 11.17%
Miami 25 4.50%
New York City 61 10.99%
Phoenix 27 4.86%
Philly 56 10.09%
San Fran 51 9.19%
Voters: 555. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-15-2019, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
157 posts, read 68,390 times
Reputation: 369

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Quote:
Originally Posted by golgi1 View Post
Being born and raised in Philly, this ^^ is really embarrassing. This kind of statement reminds me of the type of person who has never left Port Richmond (a working-class neighborhood in Philly): like Charlie from the Its Always Sunny episode in which they want to take him to the Jersey Shore, only to discover that he's never been over the bridge and they have to field all sorts of inane statements from him as a result.

For the record, Philly doesn't match up well with any of the "second rate" cities that this poster mentioned, let alone with NYC.

Chicago is one third to one half of what NYC is. That's as close as anything in this nation gets to NYC. NYC's only real peers are global-class cities like Paris, Tokyo, and Seoul. Philadelphia isn't even on the same level as Dallas, Houston, or DC in 2019.

Homers unquestionably make this site less useful than it otherwise could be. Philly homers generally being worse than the common ones that you find in other cities, on the whole. Cities generally already have promotional bureaus. Mindless city promotion, over real information, tends to water down the information here.

I agree that saying Philly is more comparable to NYC than it is Boston/SF/DC/Chicago is a joke, save for a few built environment similarities they share. NYC is in its own tier. However it is also silly to say Philly doesn't match up with the other cities. Philly is on the same tier as Boston, DC and SF, while all of them trail behind the immensity of Chicago.


In my opinion, it is a good thing to be a bit of a homer. Who doesn't want to take pride in their city and celebrate all it has to offer? Wherever you live, you should seek out its positive attributes to better enjoy your life. Show others so they can enjoy it as much as you. Of course one should not state falsehoods about a city's attributes, or conveniently omit its less desirable qualities when comparing cities.


I'm a Philly transplant and a bit of a "homer." I'm wondering what evidence you have that Philly homers are any worse than others on the site? Perhaps a bit more defensive than others, since we get some undo flack. But I've noticed plenty of defensiveness from other cities too.
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Old 01-15-2019, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,162 posts, read 7,175,341 times
Reputation: 6998
1. Chicago
2. Boston
3. Philadelphia
4. New York
5. Los Angeles
6. Miami
7. San Francisco
8. Houston
9. Dallas
10. Las Vegas
11. Phoenix
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Old 01-15-2019, 03:11 PM
 
7,411 posts, read 9,193,053 times
Reputation: 8537
I'll take Boston, Chicago, and LA/SF if they were affordable. I'll pass on the rest..
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Old 01-15-2019, 03:56 PM
 
16,434 posts, read 3,512,468 times
Reputation: 4857
Phoenix cuz of the mild winters.
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Old 01-15-2019, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,865 posts, read 916,397 times
Reputation: 1631
If we’re talking living within city limits, based on the cities I’ve lived in:

1. Chicago
2. Boston
3. San Francisco
4. LA

But, if I adjust it to where I imagine I’d like most within the confines of this poll, I’d say:

1. NYC
2. Chicago
3. Boston
4. San Francisco
5. Philadelphia

Now if we are talking MSA, I’d probabaly go:

1. Boston
2. San Francisco
3. Chicago
4. NYC
5. LA
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Old 01-16-2019, 02:06 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,215 posts, read 2,037,764 times
Reputation: 2660
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
I'll take Boston, Chicago, and LA/SF if they were affordable. I'll pass on the rest..
"if they were affordable"

They don't have a laughed-till-I-cried emoji in the library here. Especially when it comes to holding out that hope about San Francisco.

In which case, you're pretty much stuck with Chicago and nowhere else. You might want to give some of those other cities a try.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muinteoir View Post
I agree that saying Philly is more comparable to NYC than it is Boston/SF/DC/Chicago is a joke, save for a few built environment similarities they share. NYC is in its own tier. However it is also silly to say Philly doesn't match up with the other cities. Philly is on the same tier as Boston, DC and SF, while all of them trail behind the immensity of Chicago.


In my opinion, it is a good thing to be a bit of a homer. Who doesn't want to take pride in their city and celebrate all it has to offer? Wherever you live, you should seek out its positive attributes to better enjoy your life. Show others so they can enjoy it as much as you. Of course one should not state falsehoods about a city's attributes, or conveniently omit its less desirable qualities when comparing cities.


I'm a Philly transplant and a bit of a "homer." I'm wondering what evidence you have that Philly homers are any worse than others on the site? Perhaps a bit more defensive than others, since we get some undo flack. But I've noticed plenty of defensiveness from other cities too.
1) Without a doubt, New York City is on its own plane, above and beyond any other city in the United States. But there are a number of American cities that offer much, maybe even most, of what New York has to offer, only on a much smaller scale. And most of those lack New York's downsides (it does have some, COL being a biggie, though you can mitigate that somewhat by living in an outer borough).

But I have noticed of late what I could only call the creeping Manhattanization of Philadelphia's downtown. I got my latest taste of it tonight as I gazed wide-eyed at the Jenny Holzer aphorisms scrolling in parallel streams across the lobby ceiling of the Comcast Technology Center, Center City's newest skyscraper and at least for now the tallest building in the United States outside New York or Chicago. To wit:



That statement "tallest building in the United States outside New York or Chicago" is emblematic enough of the change; sheesh, up until 30 years ago, Philadelphia's downtown skyline was a municipal buzz cut. The Jenny Holzer installation is just another fillip, though this building is full of fillips.

The East Market development, which has given the lonely landmark PSFS building some company on the other side of City Hall - and which has huge hi-def digital billboards on its corners - provides a little more evidence.

It probably will never get the kind of fabuluxe boutiques one finds on Madison or Fifth avenues, or even in Soho - the big bucks just aren't there in sufficient quantity, so we locals will have to head out to King of Prussia, which is near the big bucks, to find them. But let me posit this: Just as Rodeo Drive is not in the core city of the Los Angeles Basin, so King of Prussia is not in the core city of the Philadelphia region, and the shopping in KoP has risen just about to the level of Madison Avenue or North Michigan Avenue if not Rodeo Drive. So if Rodeo Drive counts for LA, then so should KoP for Philadelphia. The only thing is, it's a shopping mall, albeit probably the snazziest in the country now.

2) Like you, I'm a Philly transplant and a homer, and I agree with you that people should be proud of the places they call home and want to talk up its assets. Duderino, however, notes accurately that this sort of homerism isn't really endemic to Philly natives: I've been known to say, "Philadelphia is underrated, and no one underrates it more than the natives." But I have come to understand that some of this is actually the manifestation of something different: Philadelphians reserving for themselves the right to bash the place. In other words, "We can trash-talk this town to our heart's content, but don't you dare."

And it just happens to be the most affordable of the large cities of the Northeast - so if you want to live in this part of the country, and if you want a big-city experience, and you don't want to pay through the nose for the privilege - or you don't want to have to suffer the hubris of Official Washingtonians, who impose a tax higher than any levied by the local governments on your psyche - then Philadelphia is, or should be, your first choice.
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Old 01-16-2019, 05:02 AM
 
915 posts, read 1,158,718 times
Reputation: 1904
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
1. Chicago
2. Boston
3. Philadelphia
4. New York
5. Los Angeles
6. Miami
7. San Francisco
8. Houston
9. Dallas
10. Las Vegas
11. Phoenix
I'm using your list because I am too lazy to go to the top and reference the poll; I am homering the first three since I have lived in each one and actually liked living in each of the top three alot. I do have an advantage of having visited the rest at least twice, and this list is suprisingly similar to mine and for me a good list, although Philly is lower on the list. I have been there through the years and just can't get into the immense love for the city, although there are unique things I like about it.

1. Chicago ( surprised it is first on this poll though since it seems to have alot of detractors)
2. Los Angeles
3. Boston
4, New York ( although would seem a tough place to live)
5. San Francisco ( see NY)
5. Philly (tie) -Have a hard time with the grafitti and being somewhat dirty, as with NYC
6. Miami
7. Houston
8. Dallas
9. Phoenix
10. Las Vegas
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Old 01-16-2019, 09:11 PM
 
8,674 posts, read 4,768,989 times
Reputation: 2902
Quote:
Originally Posted by golgi1 View Post
Being born and raised in Philly, this ^^ is really embarrassing. This kind of statement reminds me of the type of person who has never left Port Richmond (a working-class neighborhood in Philly): like Charlie from the Its Always Sunny episode in which they want to take him to the Jersey Shore, only to discover that he's never been over the bridge and they have to field all sorts of inane statements from him as a result.

For the record, Philly doesn't match up well with any of the "second rate" cities that this poster mentioned, let alone with NYC.

Chicago is one third to one half of what NYC is. That's as close as anything in this nation gets to NYC. NYC's only real peers are global-class cities like Paris, Tokyo, and Seoul. Philadelphia isn't even on the same level as Dallas, Houston, or DC in 2019.

Homers unquestionably make this site less useful than it otherwise could be. Philly homers generally being worse than the common ones that you find in other cities, on the whole. Cities generally already have promotional bureaus. Mindless city promotion, over real information, tends to water down the information here.
Bumping 4 year old threads isn't particularly useful either.
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Old 01-18-2019, 11:26 AM
 
140 posts, read 84,910 times
Reputation: 146
Philadelphia for me! Walkability, rowhouses, cobblestones, cheesesteaks and NY-style pizza, good Catholic population, other major cities are very accessible, it is cold and expensive but not super-cold or super-expensive like Boston...
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Old 01-18-2019, 07:09 PM
 
652 posts, read 394,845 times
Reputation: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post

I like 4 seasons and an urban environment. New York, Chicago, Philly, and Boston are the best cities for that on this list.
For an urban environment you can add San Francisco to that list.
Great post (for your list about the cities in the poll)....

For your urban environment i think you can add DC to your list.


from archBoston.org
Quote:
Originally Posted by HenryAlan View Post
I have a friend in Dallas who came to Boston recently for business and we went out for a few beers. He was absolutely stunned by the street level. He kept saying he'd never seen another city like this one and that it was spectacular how much activity and interesting architecture would appear around every corner, down every narrow twisting street. Yeah, we definitely do forget to notice sometimes just how great our urban environment is.
Henry's friend apparently was forgetting NYC, Chicago & Philly.... but yes!



old (the Bulfinch Triangle) meets new on Causeway Street...

Quote:
Originally Posted by datadyne007 View Post
The Hub is spectacular.

Taken last night before the C's game:

Quote:
Originally Posted by stefalarchitect View Post





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