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View Poll Results: What city would you most like to live in? Why?
Boston 59 10.19%
Chicago 93 16.06%
Dallas 47 8.12%
Houston 45 7.77%
Las Vegas 40 6.91%
Los Angeles 65 11.23%
Miami 27 4.66%
New York City 62 10.71%
Phoenix 27 4.66%
Philly 63 10.88%
San Fran 51 8.81%
Voters: 579. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-05-2019, 10:28 AM
 
843 posts, read 395,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by march2 View Post
I picked Philly, but Chicago is a VERY close 2nd for me. I agree with you on all of your points. The people are the friendliest of other cities like NYC, Boston, Philly, LA, SF, etc from my own experiences. The downtown is surprisingly clean for a city of that size. Just love the area.
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Old 02-05-2019, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Webster, New York
93 posts, read 94,990 times
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Boston...because I like parades!!!
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Old 02-18-2019, 04:54 PM
 
655 posts, read 399,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by march2 View Post
I'd pick Philadelphia. It's has tons of recreational assets, lots of tremendous history, not far from the beach and Poconos, great healthcare, very close to DC and NYC, great transit, and still affordable. The area has really grown on me. I love living where I do. But of the cities you listed, Philly would be my pick.
Philly vs Boston for history is like

the 1970-71 Bruins vs the 1970-71 Canadians,

Ali vs Foreman,

or Ali vs Frasier.

You don't get to argue one is better than the other.

You'll embarrass yourself if/when the true facts come out.
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Old 02-18-2019, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,334 posts, read 2,084,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odurandina View Post
Philly vs Boston for history is like

the 1970-71 Bruins vs the 1970-71 Canadians,

Ali vs Foreman,

or Ali vs Frasier.

You don't get to argue one is better than the other.

You'll embarrass yourself if/when the true facts come out.
I phrased it this way somewhere on this forum - maybe even upthread:

"Boston is where they lit the fire under the crucible in which the country was forged. Philadelphia was the crucible."
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Old 02-20-2019, 11:51 PM
 
2,165 posts, read 2,698,955 times
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I voted for the city I live in (mostly) now: Philly.

Why?

Well there's a lot of American history here... Duh!

It is big enough to have cool and exciting things: great culture, architecture and really cool unique urban aspects: tons of country living aspects right in parts of the NW and NE sections: including forest and horse farms. And yet, the narrow rowhouse streets of South Philly (and spot areas in other sections line North Philly and Germantown) are unique in this nation.

There are comfortable old suburban-like neighborhoods inside Philly like Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill and Center City is one of the largest and most exciting downtowns in America with its mix of bustling modern buildings but, more notably, the mix of apts (old and new), row homes and the steady growing number of mid-to-high rise apt and condo towers. Street life downtown buzzes throughout most of the day and into the night in many sections of Center City and there are numerous Manhattan-moments pedestrians may experience here. Philadelphia, like European (and Canadian) cities, is better at maintaining urban parks and greenery than any really large city I've seen in America. Fairmount Park is the largest municipal park system in the world. And the couple farms in the city, plus the giant Erdenheim farm allotment adjacent to the city at Chestnut Hill creates a city-country aspect unseen in this country among big cities. And for homes, there's a strong aspect for trees and gardens -- there is some grass, but big lawns are not the thing here like, say, a Midwestern town like Chicago or Cleveland (myrtle is often more prevalent in yards than grass). But foliage is great here among the old brick and stone neighborhoods here.

And yet, for all it's 1.5 million city residents, Philly often seems and operates like a country town. It's much slower paced here than other NE cities (save Baltimore) and even non NE cities like Chicago and SF... It has a strong hometown feel.

And mass transit is excellent (esp by American standards). SEPTA is a huge, layered network of rapid-transit (subways, els, subway-surface LRT, suburban trolleys (and rapid transit), and, of course, the huge electrified regional rail/commuter lines connecting much of Philly (half its stations are inside the city), close-in and far flung burbs out in the farm land. Regional rail is buttressed by being on the core Northeast Corridor high-speed rail system connecting NYC, DC and Boston. One can easily exist without a car in Philadelphia. Mixed-use development has been going on here for centuries and Philly is one of the most intimate, walkable cities in America. The quality mass transit, including the extensive old commuter system in the burbs, has created urban nodes around rail stations whereby nearby farm land and urban parks can comfortably exist... The freeway system in Philly stinks -- its the worst of all big cities in America. Its small for a city this size and old -- the Schuylkill Expressway is antiquated, narrow (mostly 2-lanes in each direction with tiny exit ramps with little-to-no accelerator areas) and terrible -- and yet, this bad freeways system, in a way, is a cool aspect of Philly. Walking, intimacy and mass transit is favored here, which I really like...

And the population here is very diverse. Foreigners like it here -- many Euros find Philly reminds them of home in terms of its access, age, architecture and intimate street scale. Yes Philly has its downsides. It is waaaayyy too dirty -- trash abounds in even nice parts of town, and there are aspects of the city that just seem run down, esp buildings, roadways and mass transit. There is a strong undercurrent of meanness and unhappiness among too many locals and too many people simply hate Philly for one reason or another (which I theorize so many people throw and accept so much trash here)... Even though there is significant poverty, poor education and even illiteracy, there is the greatest system of mostly private higher education here in the country -- including Boston. There's a very intelligent and old-money class here coexisting among the street-savvy working class who love their Iggles!

But overall, the positives way out number these negatives. (note these comments are far from comprehensive, but more off the cuff)...

Last edited by TheProf; 02-21-2019 at 12:23 AM..
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Old 02-21-2019, 03:44 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,334 posts, read 2,084,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheProf View Post
I voted for the city I live in (mostly) now: Philly.

Why?

[long list of positive attributes deleted. Actually, IMO, the city needs more street trees in many of its outlying neighborhoods, but Center City, parts of University City, and the Northwest part of the city (Germantown, Mt. Airy, Chestnut Hill, Roxborough, Manayunk) are quite green.]

Yes Philly has its downsides. It is waaaayyy too dirty -- trash abounds in even nice parts of town, and there are aspects of the city that just seem run down, esp buildings, roadways and mass transit. There is a strong undercurrent of meanness and unhappiness among too many locals and too many people simply hate Philly for one reason or another (which I theorize so many people throw and accept so much trash here)... Even though there is significant poverty, poor education and even illiteracy, there is the greatest system of mostly private higher education here in the country -- including Boston. There's a very intelligent and old-money class here coexisting among the street-savvy working class who love their Iggles!

But overall, the positives way out number these negatives. (note these comments are far from comprehensive, but more off the cuff)...
(emphasis added)

I've said for some time now, "Philadelphia is underrated, and no one underrates it more than the locals."

But:

1) I've found that under that gruff exterior, Philadelphians are actually pretty friendly people. Not Midwestern-friendly, granted - this is the Northeast, after all - but friendlier than that image would lead you to believe. I've also seen reports from many visitors who say Philadelphians are actually friendly and helpful.

2) Lots of Philadelphians do put this place down. "Negadelphianism" has a long and storied history - people still talk about and refer to a legendary marketing campaign a local organization sponsored in the 1970s whose slogan was surprisingly modest, self-deprecating, and (yes) accurate:



But more recently, I've discovered that there is a variant of Negadelphianism that I call "tough love." These are the people who downshout it because they love it (and in most cases want it to get even better); their attitude when they encounter outsiders who join in the criticism is, "We can trash-talk this place all we want to, but don't you dare!"

(One of those "tough love" Negadelphians was the man who made the magazine I write for what it is today. D. Herbert Lipson turned the Chamber of Commerce publication his father had bought in the 1950s into the first of what we now know as "city magazines" in 1965 (two years before Clay Felker did the same thing with the ailing New York Herald Tribune's Sunday magazine). Philadelphia developed a reputation for reporting with attitude and digging deep into the soul of the city, both celebrating and criticizing it as needed; "Best of" awards, a city magazine staple, are a Phillymag invention, and when the mag first created them (in an article that opened with this phrase that appears on a mural in our office lobby: "God couldn't be here tonight, so we've taken this opportunity to fill in for Him"), they included "Worst of" awards too. Those disappeared sometime in the late 1980s.

(His signed editorial column, "Off the Cuff," appeared on the first inside page of every issue right up to his death in December 2017. In it, he confessed his love for his hometown, but reading it, one got the impression he thought it was going to Hell in a handbasket. [And people who looked like me were one of the big reasons it was headed there: the mag also had a reputation for racial insensitivity, to put it mildly, that it's doing a lot to shake under his son's leadership. Hiring me - in late 2015 - was one of those things they did to shake it, by the way.)
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Old 02-22-2019, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,017 posts, read 586,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheProf View Post

And yet, for all it's 1.5 million city residents, Philly often seems and operates like a country town. It's much slower paced here than other NE cities (save Baltimore) and even non NE cities like Chicago and SF... It has a strong hometown feel.
Ugh, I can't stand when people say this. Philly does not, in any way, shape, or form, operate like "a small country town." Maybe certain insular neighborhoods do, but the city as a whole most certainly doesn't, especially in 2019. Have you ever lived in an actual small, country town? There is exactly zero similarities between it and the city of Philadelphia, save for humans live in both. Also, Philadelphia is not slow-paced, even by NEC standards.
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Old 02-22-2019, 06:14 AM
 
2,853 posts, read 1,326,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
Ugh, I can't stand when people say this. Philly does not, in any way, shape, or form, operate like "a small country town." Maybe certain insular neighborhoods do, but the city as a whole most certainly doesn't, especially in 2019. Have you ever lived in an actual small, country town? There is exactly zero similarities between it and the city of Philadelphia, save for humans live in both. Also, Philadelphia is not slow-paced, even by NEC standards.
Maybe it was a reference to its founder..... who first laid out the city originally (as the area that we know a Center City Philly today) William Penn. But his plans were not replicated as the city boomed. Philly's core was the first US planned street-grid.

Wanting a greener city then the parts of London, UK he grew up and designed small parks as town squares (still there) and felt everyone should have a small yard for a garden and separated by green-space. Not quite what happened as a denser layout came

William Penn penned Philly his " Greene County Towne"

Planning Philadelphia

Of course, I would not say Philly is more a Big Town. Certainly not slow-paced.
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Old 02-22-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,017 posts, read 586,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
Maybe it was a reference to its founder..... who first laid out the city originally (as the area that we know a Center City Philly today) William Penn. But his plans were not replicated as the city boomed. Philly's core was the first US planned street-grid.

Wanting a greener city then the parts of London, UK he grew up and designed small parks as town squares (still there) and felt everyone should have a small yard for a garden and separated by green-space. Not quite what happened as a denser layout came

William Penn penned Philly his " Greene County Towne"

Planning Philadelphia

Of course, I would not say Philly is more a Big Town. Certainly not slow-paced.
Just because someone penned it (no pun intended, heh heh) their "Greene Country Towne" in the 17th or 18th century doesn't make it true in the 21st century. I grew up in a small country town, and trust me, Philadelphia is nothing like it. It is through and through a big city with a big city attitude. Anyone who thinks otherwise isn't paying attention.
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Old 02-22-2019, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,334 posts, read 2,084,968 times
Reputation: 2731
Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
Ugh, I can't stand when people say this. Philly does not, in any way, shape, or form, operate like "a small country town." Maybe certain insular neighborhoods do, but the city as a whole most certainly doesn't, especially in 2019. Have you ever lived in an actual small, country town? There is exactly zero similarities between it and the city of Philadelphia, save for humans live in both. Also, Philadelphia is not slow-paced, even by NEC standards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
Just because someone penned it (no pun intended, heh heh) their "Greene Country Towne" in the 17th or 18th century doesn't make it true in the 21st century. I grew up in a small country town, and trust me, Philadelphia is nothing like it. It is through and through a big city with a big city attitude. Anyone who thinks otherwise isn't paying attention.
I have been known to refer to our mutual hometown as "a small town masquerading as a big city."

You're right that the pace of life here in no way resembles that of a small town, but it strikes me that there is an everyone-knows-everyone-else quality to not only its neighborhoods (though that has attenuated with the influx of Millennials from outside the region and new residents from abroad) but also its professional circles.

When I attend openings and receptions in the real estate biz (this includes restaurants that are integral to the success of some real estate development), I invariably run into many of the same faces. Jerry Sweeney (Brandywine Realty Trust's CEO - head of the biggest commercial landlord in both this city and Austin, Texas) greets me like an old friend. And it seems that whenever I do make a new acquaintance, we can establish a connection with only one degree of separation. (I should try this with Kevin Bacon sometime.)

Now, this may also be the case in places like Washington, Chicago, LA or New York, but I have this sneaking feeling that only Official Washington matches it.

And there's also this: Unless you are pursuing a career in the law or in a biomedical field, if you're really ambitious and want to break into the true big time, there will come a point where you must leave Philadelphia to advance any further. The periodical I work for is up there with the Inquirer/Daily News/Philly.com and WPVI-TV (6ABC) at the top of the local media heap; after us, what? My former colleague Holly Otterbein, one of our best political reporters, is now in Washington. Jim Saksa of WHYY followed her. I'm rooted here and well up in years, or else I might have done the same thing.

I mean, jeez, our local newscasters and weather forecasters pass for celebrities. Meanwhile, as I learned recently, the real celebs here keep very low profiles - because they can.

This is a big Northeastern city, no doubt about that. But at the same time, it isn't.
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