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Old 03-05-2010, 12:33 PM
 
42 posts, read 29,125 times
Reputation: 37
I can't believe for the life of me why people would want to live in NYC, LA, or any of those other HCOL areas. Having moved around all my life, I am not tied to any one location. Not to any location within the U.S., or to anywhere in the world for that matter. In fact, I am not even living or working in the U.S. right now. What is important to me is how far my dollar goes, and not being cold for too long. Weather and cost of living are equally important to where I decide to live.
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Old 03-05-2010, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Outside of Los Angeles
1,224 posts, read 1,474,392 times
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I know that everyone obviously has different preferences as the the weather but now at this time in my life(I'm 32 now), I would much rather deal with the cold over the heat. At least when it is cold outside, you can prepare for it ahead of time. That is why department stores sell clothes like scarves, ear muffs and big thick coats. Its called put on some clothes and just go outside. Okay I understand that some people can't handle the cold because of some medical condition. But others just don't like it for a variety of reasons.

When I was younger, I would love it if it was sunny all the time. Not anymore. There is nothing better than walking outside and being able to first of all breathe clean, fresh air which is something I can't do in my current location because of all the dust and smog. And then, when it is cold, you can stay outside for hours and not sweat. In contrast, when it is too hot, especially if there is humidity in the air, it is not possible to stay outside for long periods of time without sweating, or possibly getting heat stroke. You can only spend so much time in a swimming pool but you can walk outside for 2 hours when it is 30F or below if you are properly dressed and NOTHING will happen to you. Frostbite? I doubt that it would happen if you are well dressed. The only real danger that I see about the cold is being careful to not slip on the ice. Well, what can I say, bring on the cold I'm living in the wrong place because its not cold enough here for my tastes.

Last edited by AliveandWell; 03-05-2010 at 02:16 PM.. Reason: add text
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Old 03-05-2010, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 4,862,996 times
Reputation: 1281
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgtm7 View Post
I can't believe for the life of me why people would want to live in NYC, LA, or any of those other HCOL areas.
The answer lies in your question: places aren't high cost-of-living simply by accident, they're high cost-of-living due to the fact that many people want to live there. Why? Frequently, it has to do with a strong economy, cultural amenities and the opportunity to live in and experience an urban life that many people enjoy.

People make sacrifices regardless of where they live; in high COL areas this would typically be space and/or a savings account.
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Old 03-06-2010, 06:03 AM
 
42 posts, read 29,125 times
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Quote:
The answer lies in your question: places aren't high cost-of-living simply by accident, they're high cost-of-living due to the fact that many people want to live there. Why? Frequently, it has to do with a strong economy, cultural amenities and the opportunity to live in and experience an urban life that many people enjoy.
That sounds like good rhetoric, but rhetoric is all it is. Aside from LA and NYC, I could easily point out cities with the same population size, with one having a high cost of living and the other having a low cost of living. Which would mean that an equal number of people have a desire to live in both locations.
I am not arguing the point that people have there reasons for WHEREVER they live. I just have a hard time understanding people who complain about the high cost of living in their area, but refuse to move.
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Old 03-06-2010, 09:03 AM
 
486 posts, read 613,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgtm7 View Post
That sounds like good rhetoric, but rhetoric is all it is. Aside from LA and NYC, I could easily point out cities with the same population size, with one having a high cost of living and the other having a low cost of living. Which would mean that an equal number of people have a desire to live in both locations.
I am not arguing the point that people have there reasons for WHEREVER they live. I just have a hard time understanding people who complain about the high cost of living in their area, but refuse to move.
I don't understand many of those people who complain and won't move either. However, many people (myself included) knowingly live in high COL places because they love the area, and/or have good jobs they don't want to leave.

Another point, it seems that in NYC for example, Manhattan is always the area everyone points to when looking at rents, etc...meanwhile there are other (even middle class) neighborhoods in the city which are more affordable but don't get much attention. Granted, these 'more affordable' areas aren't as affordable as in other parts of the country, but they're still doable for middle class people.
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Old 03-07-2010, 01:02 PM
 
Location: all over NJ-currently in Totowa
316 posts, read 500,155 times
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I cant believe anyone would want to live in Nevada- if your not near Vegas or Reno-

Jmho- but there is an awful lot of sand and no beach in the middle of that place
But its a large state and probaly has nice towns somewhere- -so dont attack me
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Old 03-07-2010, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
196 posts, read 346,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgtm7 View Post
That sounds like good rhetoric, but rhetoric is all it is. Aside from LA and NYC, I could easily point out cities with the same population size, with one having a high cost of living and the other having a low cost of living. Which would mean that an equal number of people have a desire to live in both locations.
I don't think that computes. The demand to live in a place and its population are not the same thing by any means. A city's population depends on many factors--how much housing it has, what its historical population is, how many jobs there are, and so on. Think of a really nice small city--a lot of people might want to move there, but that doesn't mean it's automatically going to become a large city (which might defeat the whole purpose of people moving there in the first place.) Population changes a lot less quickly than demand does and depends on a lot of other factors.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sgtm7 View Post
I am not arguing the point that people have there reasons for WHEREVER they live. I just have a hard time understanding people who complain about the high cost of living in their area, but refuse to move.
Moving isn't easy. Maybe they have a job that keeps them in place. The cost of paying a lot for housing, etc. might still not match the perceived opportunity cost of uprooting and moving. Plus maybe those people like living in those places, but are still hurting from the costs. It's like if I went on a diet, I might really enjoy what I looked and felt like, and know I was making a good decision for myself overall, but still complain about the lack of fatty meats or chocolate or whatever.
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Old 03-07-2010, 02:51 PM
 
1 posts, read 168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milwaukee City View Post
I can't believe for the life of me why people would want to live in the north. IE Twin Cities, Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland and so on. NY and CHI are such nice cities that winter doesn't matter or that you have so much going on in NYC, and Chicago that you just put up with the weather. I love Milwaukee more than any other city I have been to. Winter is terrible I can't believe people actually like shoveling a foot of snow every two weeks and the cold and dark days, you might as well live in Alaska. Why not live somewhere where people go on vacation, family you ask what are you going to cry every minute you can't see your aunts and uncles and parents. I hate winter and I know I'm just whining but when people tell me they like winter I also think they would like sleeping on a bed of nails too. I can't comprehend that when people tell me they like snow and cold and dark days and change of seasons. For me it's like trying to understand a Korean math problem. Nobody in there right mind I believe enjoys bad weather, these must be the people who love to be miserable. I'm moving to SD or Miami when the wife graduates grad school. Winter is the devils summer. I just don't believe you when you say I enjoy winter! yeah and I enjoy a hammer hitting my toes!!!
Agree with you wholehearted about the winter. It sucks because it's too darn long! It is not so much the cold as it is the gray and dreariness. You say that we just put up with the weather in Chicago because the city is so nice? What on earth gives you that idea? and why would someone from Milwaukee WI make such an odd sweeping, statement that is so inaccurate about a place he does not live? They make a huge deal about the weather here. It is griped about more than just about any other thing besides the city's slimeball leaders. Even the weathermen and news anchors here have it burned into their routines to complain at least once a day about the weather to seem like the common man on the street.

Totally DISagree that Chicago and New York are nice cities anymore. Chicago was ALOT better in the day. There are too many suburban minded people in the mix now. Giant swaths of our cities are run down and crime ridden. Chicago for example has 4 of the worst neighborhoods in America. Highest sales tax that chases alot of my old friends and neighbors away. Our city's insane cost of living increases in the last few years are not being met with better paying jobs. The unions are driving many conventions away. The shops and restaurants only seem to only be vibrant on weekends when Chicago turns into a giant shopping mall. So where the heck are all these damn cars coming from? To see some buildings and go home? Seems like everyone here is up to their eyeballs in debt and riding around in a car they can't afford. It's a sham of a city bud. A facade. I'll stop ranting now. It just burns my beans when people talk about Chicago like all that is wrong is the weather. It is one of the most congested and cities there is.
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Old 03-07-2010, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 4,862,996 times
Reputation: 1281
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgtm7 View Post
That sounds like good rhetoric, but rhetoric is all it is. Aside from LA and NYC, I could easily point out cities with the same population size, with one having a high cost of living and the other having a low cost of living. Which would mean that an equal number of people have a desire to live in both locations.
No, it's not simply rhetoric, and with all due respect your argument makes no sense. Commensurate populations do not in any way provide an indication as far as how many people *want* to live in a particular area. There are any number of reasons why someone may live in a particular city versus another--the ability to afford a higher cost of living city being among them. Your argument portends to assign a degree of randomness to housing costs, but housing prices can be explained by basic supply and demand models: the more people clamoring to live in a particular area, the higher the housing costs will be. This is true at the city and neighborhood level. Where demand is not high, or housing supply exceeds demand, prices drop. Thus, the cities where cost of living is higher are those cities where the greatest number of people want to live relative to the available supply of housing.

New York isn't expensive because it's New York. It's expensive because it offers a tremendous number of things that people value in a city.
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Old 03-17-2010, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Athens, GA (via Pittsburgh, PA)
9,584 posts, read 8,173,109 times
Reputation: 8632
Winters are nicer in the South. Summers are nicer in the North.
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