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View Poll Results: What city is less southern?
Atlanta 40 18.60%
Dallas 93 43.26%
Houston 82 38.14%
Voters: 215. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 06-18-2009, 01:23 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,365 posts, read 1,522,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
I set up a poll up in Fort Worth and 80% of the residents so far consider themselves southern and not western.
Do one for SA. I'm real interested in seeing the outcome of that.
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Old 06-18-2009, 01:40 AM
 
13,339 posts, read 13,509,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
Hm. I was pretty sure you were gonna say no lol.

With that said, while I do think the history makes Atlanta the cornerstone of the South (as I said before), I just don't think it makes it more southern.
Why wouldn't it?
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Old 06-18-2009, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,469 posts, read 14,953,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Why wouldn't it?
Yeah I would like to hear why too. Houston nor Dallas does not have nearly the amount of historical connections throughout the South as Atlanta does. Atlanta sits right smack in the center of the South. There is no controversy on whether it is close to another region or anything. Same cannot be said of Houston or Dallas.
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Old 06-18-2009, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Why wouldn't it?
Those events happened ages ago and have absolutely no bearing on the way people act today.

Too me, suggesting that a city is more southern than another is to say that one has more of something than the other. But all three cities have the same southern values and characteristics.
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Old 06-18-2009, 10:20 AM
 
3,424 posts, read 3,471,019 times
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Well obviously Georgia contains different cultural regions as does Louisiana, but the people in Shreveport or Ruston, LA, sound a great deal different than the people I have met from say Douglasville, or Jesup, GA. Almost completely different. And the guy I met from El Dorado, Arkansas sounds even more different than both...


As for a specific example, when I heard people from GA speak, they tended to abruptly cut the end of their words off... This was the case with both white and black Georgians, I've heard speak. Ive never heard a Louisianan from any region of the state pronounce things like that. I probably wont be able to convey the full effect here but I have heard Georgians pronounce the Sentence: "I gotta get the tree out of my yard" as:

"Gah-da- ge- duh- tree ahh- mah yord."

Never heard a Louisianan from ANY part of the state speak like that...miles apart imo..Im not sure if thats dialect or accent or whatever..but the two speech patterns sound very little alike.

point being that I think a state's cultural Southerness cannot be completely contingent on its apparent culture relative to "THE" most Southern state...as findings would be subjective, inaccurate and inconsistent...and we will literally only end up with one or two states which TRULY qualify as Southern states...

I think using a pattern of similarities by which to measure whether a state is either generally Southern or not will probably yield a more reliable outcome than parsing the differences among the states...which honestly only results in one upsmanship to such an extent that MS and AL alone would be crowned the entire "South".
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Old 06-18-2009, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
3,596 posts, read 4,312,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
Hm. I was pretty sure you were gonna say no lol.

With that said, while I do think the history makes Atlanta the cornerstone of the South (as I said before), I just don't think it makes it more southern.

Folks when you talk about corner stone of the south Birmingham and the state of Alabama is defintely the most prestigious city and state in the civil rights movement. If it was not for that movements in Birmingham, Salema, Montogomery, etc America would not be the countrty it is today. Im sorry but yes Atlanta and the state of GA and definitely has its history in the civil rights movement but with that said Alabama laid the foundation of the civil rights movement. Those African american where determined for equality.
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Old 06-18-2009, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,365 posts, read 1,522,542 times
Reputation: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
Well obviously Georgia contains different cultural regions as does Louisiana, but the people in Shreveport or Ruston, LA, sound a great deal different than the people I have met from say Douglasville, or Jesup, GA. Almost completely different. And the guy I met from El Dorado, Arkansas sounds even more different than both...


As for a specific example, when I heard people from GA speak, they tended to abruptly cut the end of their words off... This was the case with both white and black Georgians, I've heard speak. Ive never heard a Louisianan from any region of the state pronounce things like that. I probably wont be able to convey the full effect here but I have heard Georgians pronounce the Sentence: "I gotta get the tree out of my yard" as:

"Gah-da- ge- duh- tree ahh- mah yord."

Never heard a Louisianan from ANY part of the state speak like that...miles apart imo..Im not sure if thats dialect or accent or whatever..but the two speech patterns sound very little alike.

point being that I think a state's cultural Southerness cannot be completely contingent on its apparent culture relative to "THE" most Southern state...as findings would be subjective, inaccurate and inconsistent...and we will literally only end up with one or two states which TRULY qualify as Southern states...

I think using a pattern of similarities by which to measure whether a state is either generally Southern or not will probably yield a more reliable outcome than parsing the differences among the states...which honestly only results in one upsmanship to such an extent that MS and AL alone would be crowned the entire "South".
Well just like i told the other poster, any differences you might hear between the states is a change in the dialect. But the accent is the same.

But dialects are not all that solid. I even doubt any region has an official dialect. Someone from Atlanta may only sometimes speak in the dialect usually associated with that region, and sometimes they'll sound just like a regular southerner. It seems to be contingent on how deep your roots are in that specific area. Cause if you're someone like me who has been around and lived in different areas throughout the south your entire life, you likely won't have a dialect. You'll just sound neutrally southern. I guarantee you that if you met me you wouldn't have a clue where in the south I was from. The only thing you'd be certain of was that I am from the south.

At family reunions when we all get together from different states (mostly Texas, Georgia, and South Carolina) nobody's guessing who's from where cause we all sound the same. Our reunions are usually held in East Georgia since that's where most kin is at. You'll see a cousin you've never met before and you'll hear her yell out something to one of her kids. You'll assume she's from GA just like 50% of the people present, but you meet her and find out she was born and raised in Arkansas. You didn't even know you had family in Arkansas!
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Old 06-18-2009, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,469 posts, read 14,953,828 times
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I don't know. Like I said before. I believe Atlanta has more connections whether you're talking culturally, economically, socially, influence w/e to more parts of the South than Houston or Dallas does. It is literally the New York of the South to the majority of the South's residents. It's where the action is. When you get East of Louisiana, Texas cities start flying off the radar and it's basically gone by the time you hit Alabama. Atlanta also has more Southerners moving to it's city than Houston or Dallas and as such retained much of it's Southern ways to an extent.

Now this isn't saying that Houston or Dallas is no longer Southern. They still are. They are more Texan if anything though. The Rodeos, the Cowboys (and Southerners do find that unique about Texas because it isn't something you'll find in the South), the food outside of Soul Food and Cajun Food found in Houston east towards Lafayette, is all unique to Texas.
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Old 06-18-2009, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,469 posts, read 14,953,828 times
Reputation: 5071
But again, I can still spot the difference between a Houston speech and an Atlanta speech and the Atlanta speech is more similar to a Mississippi than Houston is to Mississippi and I'm speaking from a Black American's perspective.

For example, I worked with a guy from Jackson, Mississippi here in the DC area and he clearly had that Mississippi drawl and accent down to a tee. Once he opened his mouth, you knew he wasn't from around here nor was he from Texas. I never heard an accent that thick. Well we helped a customer that was originally from Philadelphia and she loved his accent. She immediately asked if he was from Atlanta because she said he sounds like someone from Atlanta. He of course corrected her and he said but it's the same.

Now here is one from another perspective. I remember a dude in Dallas telling me that some girls thought he was actually from St. Louis because of the way he talked. He was surprised by that but I told him that the speech and the way you slur your words like hurr and thurr are very very similar to each other. Arkansas does the same thing.
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Old 06-18-2009, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,365 posts, read 1,522,542 times
Reputation: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I don't know. Like I said before. I believe Atlanta has more connections whether you're talking culturally, economically, socially, influence w/e to more parts of the South than Houston or Dallas does. It is literally the New York of the South to the majority of the South's residents. It's where the action is. When you get East of Louisiana, Texas cities start flying off the radar and it's basically gone by the time you hit Alabama. Atlanta also has more Southerners moving to it's city than Houston or Dallas and as such retained much of it's Southern ways to an extent.

Now this isn't saying that Houston or Dallas is no longer Southern. They still are. They are more Texan if anything though. The Rodeos, the Cowboys (and Southerners do find that unique about Texas because it isn't something you'll find in the South), the food outside of Soul Food and Cajun Food found in Houston east towards Lafayette, is all unique to Texas.
Rodeos and cowboys are not unique to Texans. You'll find those all over the south. Texas does have its own outlandish take on it though. However in Houston, Texas culture takes the backseat to southern culture. Ask a Houstonian where they can find that atypical Texas scene and they'll point you towards Dallas. And even Dallasites will probably point you towards Ft. Worth or San Antonio.

Also about cowboys, there was a poster somewhere on here that stated by history, the Texas cowboy is a direct descendant of the southern cowboy. Not the Mexican cowboy.
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