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Old 04-21-2009, 02:52 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,747,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
Houston? Stop playing. It could fall in the gulf and no one would miss it except people in the Republic of Texas.
They wouldnt?!?
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Old 04-21-2009, 02:56 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,747,327 times
Reputation: 4208
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTheKid View Post
And the award for most obtuse comment of the day goes to...





It isn't so much where the oil is physically located, but where the distribution of said oil (and energy as a whole) is facilitated, and that is Houston. Until the US weans itself from its energy dependence, Houston will basically continue to pull the strings in Washington and have the ability to bring our infrastructure to a halting standstill. Is Houston important? California heils Schwarzenegger because Enron didn't like Gray Davis. Is Houston important? Six of the last nine presidents were deeply in the pockets of the oil lobby, and fully 1/3 of those nine presidents were at least nominally from the state of Texas.

And even if we pull ourselves away from oil, Texas (and in turn Houston)has already poised itself to become a leader in the so-called "green" energy industry. Already, Texas has more windmills than anywhere else in the country, and is itself eclipsing all but Germany and Spain for a total in the world. The next top producer in the US is California, which has roughly 1/3 the number of windmills as Texas. Third place is, I think, Colorado, which is so far behind the top two as to be negligible.

If I were you, I'd closely watch the current Texas Legislature (dubbed the "Alternative Energy Legislature") to see how what Texas is going to do in the next five years will affect your own state, and indeed the rest of the country. By the way, Texas' government officials are funded more blatantly out of Houston and Dallas boardrooms than our federal government is. It ain't difficult to discern a money trail. But, instead of watching the direction this country will head within the next decade, city-daters instead get caught up discussing Rick Perry's blustery ruse about Texas secession.

Is Houston important? Oh yes... unless you don't ever flip on your light switch, or drive a car, or ride public transportation, et cetera ad infinitum.
Exactly. Texas seccession, ANY chance they get to say "HEY LOOK AT DUMB OLD TEXAS, THEY'RE GONNA SECCED" I bet they had a field day with that. Just another stereotype they can shove down our throats. But all the other success in the state, is almost non-existent in there eyes.
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Old 04-21-2009, 02:56 PM
 
669 posts, read 1,436,052 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTheKid View Post
And the award for most obtuse comment of the day goes to...





It isn't so much where the oil is physically located, but where the distribution of said oil (and energy as a whole) is facilitated, and that is Houston. Until the US weans itself from its energy dependence, Houston will basically continue to pull the strings in Washington and have the ability to bring our infrastructure to a halting standstill. Is Houston important? California heils Schwarzenegger because Enron didn't like Gray Davis. Is Houston important? Six of the last nine presidents were deeply in the pockets of the oil lobby, and fully 1/3 of those nine presidents were at least nominally from the state of Texas.

And even if we pull ourselves away from oil, Texas (and in turn Houston)has already poised itself to become a leader in the so-called "green" energy industry. Already, Texas has more windmills than anywhere else in the country, and is itself eclipsing all but Germany and Spain for a total in the world. The next top producer in the US is California, which has roughly 1/3 the number of windmills as Texas. Third place is, I think, Colorado, which is so far behind the top two as to be negligible.

If I were you, I'd closely watch the current Texas Legislature (dubbed the "Alternative Energy Legislature") to see how what Texas is going to do in the next five years will affect your own state, and indeed the rest of the country. By the way, Texas' government officials are funded more blatantly out of Houston and Dallas boardrooms than our federal government is. It ain't difficult to discern a money trail. But, instead of watching the direction this country will head within the next decade, city-daters instead get caught up discussing Rick Perry's blustery ruse about Texas secession.

Is Houston important? Oh yes... unless you don't ever flip on your light switch, or drive a car, or ride public transportation, et cetera ad infinitum.
I think that saying TX is green is the overstatement of the century. Having been to TX hundreds of times they have the windmills bc they have SOOOO much land and wind that drives it. That's all.

They have practically no emissions limits.
Everyone drives huge SUV's and trucks
The gulf is some nasty H20
Use more electricity per capita than anywhere else.
No REAL public transportation.

Anyone agree that TX is hardly the green leader or state??

But less regulations = good business.
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Old 04-21-2009, 03:00 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,747,327 times
Reputation: 4208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maabus1999 View Post
Too bad, in a good and bad sense, Texas is on its own electric grid. What ever Texas does for green energy does ZERO for the national economy minus a few jobs in TX. You have no way to export that energy... Due to this fact, without substantial changes, TX in my mind will have a difficult time being the leader for national "green" power. Businesses may still HQ there with TX energy incentives, but for actual energy jobs, they most likely will be in other areas. Plus, the competition/lobbying from the hydrocarbon giants over these "incentives" (and denying it to companies whose goal is to reduce their profits) will be very difficult for TX to fully adapt. You explained it yourself why.

TX's biggest draw for energy and the country is its refining capacity which is substantial. State wise it does drill the most oil, but most of our domestic oil is Federally owned offshore, and throw in 70% import ratio for oil, and TX as an oil producer for the country and its impact on her is not "gigantic".

Natural gas wise that is another story (and with current prices is one reason the TX economy "might" get shocked a bit this summer).
Yeah that's a BIG might. Texas economy is not fully relied upon oil anymore that would TREMENDOUSLY effect the state. I know you didnt say that it WOULD, im just saying this for the others who are just gonna interject what they feel.
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Old 04-21-2009, 03:06 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,747,327 times
Reputation: 4208
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWong View Post
I think that saying TX is green is the overstatement of the century. Having been to TX hundreds of times they have the windmills bc they have SOOOO much land and wind that drives it. That's all.

They have practically no emissions limits.
Everyone drives huge SUV's and trucks
The gulf is some nasty H20
Use more electricity per capita than anywhere else.
No REAL public transportation.

Anyone agree that TX is hardly the green leader or state??

But less regulations = good business.
OKAY? Texas has alot of land, does that make it any less of good choice to put them there? I guess Cali is the leader, but they like to drive also. Texas may not be the leader(obviously) but who do YOU think is?
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Old 04-21-2009, 03:07 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,966,090 times
Reputation: 1661
Bush is out of office. That, and the fact that Texas didn't elect this President, should be more than enough to drop the state several pegs.
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Old 04-21-2009, 03:08 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,747,327 times
Reputation: 4208
Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
Bush is out of office. That, and the fact that Texas didn't elect this President, should be more than enough to drop the state several pegs.
You're right, Texas didnt elect the president, California did. So DONT drop Texas, just RAISE California higher then it should be.
Califorina
/
/
/
/
Texas
NY
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Old 04-21-2009, 03:10 PM
 
269 posts, read 415,817 times
Reputation: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
Bush is out of office. That, and the fact that Texas didn't elect this President, should be more than enough to drop the state several pegs.
So any state that did not vote for Obama is inferior in your eyes?

Are you serious right now?
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Old 04-21-2009, 03:13 PM
 
13,566 posts, read 22,018,249 times
Reputation: 4592
1. New York City
2. Los Angeles
3. Chicago
4. Washington, D.C.
5. Atlanta



6. Miami
7. Dallas
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Old 04-21-2009, 03:18 PM
 
13,566 posts, read 22,018,249 times
Reputation: 4592
You have to see the 5 most important cities as de-facto regional hubs.

1. New York...national/Northeast
2. Los Angeles...West
3. Washington...national
4. Chicago...Midwest
5. Atlanta...South (including North Florida)


6. Miami...Florida+Caribbean
7. Dallas...Texas+Southwest
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