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Old 10-20-2009, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,481,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maabus1999 View Post
Your map is outdated. Please use the most current one dated Aug 18, 2009

Nanotechnology Map

Current list of top nano-metros (interesting how it changed in two years though):

Boston, MA
San Francisco, CA
San Jose, CA
Raleigh, NC
Middlesex-Essex, MA
Oakland, CA
San Diego, CA
Seattle, WA
Austin, TX
Houston, TX
Chicago, IL
Santa Ana, CA
Worcester, MA
Los Angeles, CA
So as we had concluded earlier, the Bay Area and Boston are the leaders of Nanotechnology...with the Research Triangle growing in power and areas like Houston and Austin strong players.

Glad to see it's all going according to plan.
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Old 10-20-2009, 08:04 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,003 posts, read 23,535,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
5 supermajor energy companies are located in Houston though. Shell, Chevron, BP, Exxon Mobil, and Conocophillips. Houston is the American headquarters for all these companies.
Just so everyone's in the know, the supermajors are ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch Shell, BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Total S.A.

I actually looked up where Irving, Texas is (headquarters for ExxonMobil, the largest of the supermajors) and it's definitely not in the Houston area. I'm also guessing ExxonMobil's American headquarters isn't in Houston if its global headquarters is part of the Metroplex.

The other two American companies in this group are Chevron which is headquartered in the Bay Area (and my guess is its American headquarters are going to be in the Bay Area if its global headquarters are in the Bay Area) and ConocoPhillips which does actually have Houston as its American (and global) headquarters.

This leaves the three other supermajors which are headquartered in Europe. One of which is fairly Euro and Afrocentric with a fairly small presence in the US (Total S.A.) compared to all the other supermajors.

Then there's BP whose website for BP America under locations (http://www.bp.com/sectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=9023278&conten tId=7043301 - broken link) does list Houston as its American headquarters, but also states that it employs about 6,000 employees in Texas and CA each (4000 in Houston, but not stated how many in the Bay Area) and that it has a presence in five other states.

Shell also has its American subsidiary in Houston with various branch offices elsewhere. However, for both of these companies, the American branch is a fairly small chunk of their big ol' oil pie with American non-supermajors (Valero in San Antonio, Marathon in Houston) generating more than or close to the American subsidiaries of these supermajors.

Overall, it's doubtless that Houston is a big player among the supermajors (though apparently the supermajors own about 5% of oil and gas reserves). However, it's not the end all be all since there are refineries all along the various coasts (including several in the Bay Area) and some more inland, corporate headquarters in various cities, actual reserves elsewhere (the oil itself isn't exactly in Houston proper or its metro), tankers working in ports other than that of Houston, and r&d and marketing done and directed from other cities.

Houston is the oil capital of the US, however, the Bay Area, the Metroplex, and to a lesser extent, San Antonio, play substantial roles as well. This was part of my argument for why the Bay Area probably sits in the top 5 with the others I've listed before and not DFW, Houston, Boston, Atlanta, Philly, or Miami (though no one's really tried to argue for Miami)--the Bay Area has some things a lot better than these cities and the ones I listed in the top 5. It also remains competitive or plays a strong second fiddle in a lot of other things. In regards to Houston's specific advantages compared to other cities, the Bay Area plays second fiddle in oil (though it's harder to say when it comes energy in general because of the public contributions in terms of r&d done at the national laboratories and at Berkeley as well as the many smaller companies tackling energy in general) but in virtually nothing else. It ties Houston in overall number of Fortune 500 companies, but you can take a quick look at the earnings and profits and see that the Bay Area has earned more both in revenues and profits this year, and in far more diverse fields. For example the top 50 for this year's Forbes list gives the Bay Area number 3 (Chevron), 9 (Hewlett-Packard), 15 (McKesson; health care), 41 (Wells Fargo; one of the big four banks), 50 (Safeway; food and drugs retailer) while for Houston you have 4 (ConocoPhillips which has posted massive losses this year), 23 (Marathon Oil). And again, the Bay Area has a host of smaller companies that wouldn't make the Fortune list but are successful as well as several private and public institutions that don't have public offerings and thus wouldn't be listed.

I totally went OCD on this.

Last edited by OyCrumbler; 10-20-2009 at 08:59 PM..
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Old 10-20-2009, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,260,583 times
Reputation: 2929
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Just so everyone's in the know, the supermajors are ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch Shell, BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Total S.A.

I actually looked up where Irving, Texas is (headquarters for ExxonMobil, the largest of the supermajors) and it's definitely not in the Houston area. I'm also guessing ExxonMobil's American headquarters isn't in Houston if its global headquarters is part of the Metroplex.

The other two American companies in this group are Chevron which is headquartered in the Bay Area (and my guess is its American headquarters are going to be in the Bay Area if its global headquarters are in the Bay Area) and ConocoPhillips which does actually have Houston as its American (and global) headquarters.

This leaves the three other supermajors which are headquartered in Europe. One of which is fairly Euro and Afrocentric with a fairly small presence in the US (Total S.A.) compared to all the other supermajors.

Then there's BP whose website for BP America under locations (http://www.bp.com/sectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=9023278&conten tId=7043301 - broken link) does list Houston as its American headquarters, but also states that it employs about 6,000 employees in Texas and CA each (4000 in Houston, but not stated how many in the Bay Area) and that it has a presence in five other states.

Shell also has its American subsidiary in Houston with various branch offices elsewhere. However, for both of these companies, the American branch is a fairly small chunk of their big ol' oil pie.

Overall, it's doubtless that Houston is a big player among the supermajors (though apparently the supermajors own about 5% of oil and gas reserves). However, it's not the end all be all since there are refineries all along the various coasts (including several in the Bay Area) and some more inland, corporate headquarters in various cities, actual reserves elsewhere (the oil itself isn't exactly in Houston proper or its metro), tankers working in ports other than that of Houston, and r&d and marketing done and directed from other cities.

Again, Houston is the oil capital of the US, however, the Bay Area and the Metroplex play substantial roles as well. This was part of my argument for why the Bay Area probably sits in the top 5 with the others I've listed before and not DFW, Houston, Boston, Atlanta, Philly, or Miami (though no one's really tried to argue for Miami)--the Bay Area has some things a lot better than these cities and the ones I listed in the top 5. It also remains competitive or plays a strong second fiddle in a lot of other things.

I totally went OCD on this.
yes you did.but it was well thought out.
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Old 10-20-2009, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,618,808 times
Reputation: 7264
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Just so everyone's in the know, the supermajors are ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch Shell, BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Total S.A.

I actually looked up where Irving, Texas is (headquarters for ExxonMobil, the largest of the supermajors) and it's definitely not in the Houston area. I'm also guessing ExxonMobil's American headquarters isn't in Houston if its global headquarters is part of the Metroplex.

The other two American companies in this group are Chevron which is headquartered in the Bay Area (and my guess is its American headquarters are going to be in the Bay Area if its global headquarters are in the Bay Area) and ConocoPhillips which does actually have Houston as its American (and global) headquarters.

This leaves the three other supermajors which are headquartered in Europe. One of which is fairly Euro and Afrocentric with a fairly small presence in the US (Total S.A.) compared to all the other supermajors.

Then there's BP whose website for BP America under locations (http://www.bp.com/sectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=9023278&conten tId=7043301 - broken link) does list Houston as its American headquarters, but also states that it employs about 6,000 employees in Texas and CA each (4000 in Houston, but not stated how many in the Bay Area) and that it has a presence in five other states.

Shell also has its American subsidiary in Houston with various branch offices elsewhere. However, for both of these companies, the American branch is a fairly small chunk of their big ol' oil pie with American non-supermajors (Valero in San Antonio, Marathon in Houston) generating more than or close to the American subsidiaries of these supermajors.

Overall, it's doubtless that Houston is a big player among the supermajors (though apparently the supermajors own about 5% of oil and gas reserves). However, it's not the end all be all since there are refineries all along the various coasts (including several in the Bay Area) and some more inland, corporate headquarters in various cities, actual reserves elsewhere (the oil itself isn't exactly in Houston proper or its metro), tankers working in ports other than that of Houston, and r&d and marketing done and directed from other cities.

Houston is the oil capital of the US, however, the Bay Area, the Metroplex, and to a lesser extent, San Antonio, play substantial roles as well. This was part of my argument for why the Bay Area probably sits in the top 5 with the others I've listed before and not DFW, Houston, Boston, Atlanta, Philly, or Miami (though no one's really tried to argue for Miami)--the Bay Area has some things a lot better than these cities and the ones I listed in the top 5. It also remains competitive or plays a strong second fiddle in a lot of other things. In regards to Houston's specific advantages compared to other cities, the Bay Area plays second fiddle in oil (though it's harder to say when it comes energy in general because of the public contributions in terms of r&d done at the national laboratories and at Berkeley as well as the many smaller companies tackling energy in general) but in virtually nothing else. It ties Houston in overall number of Fortune 500 companies, but you can take a quick look at the earnings and profits and see that the Bay Area has earned more both in revenues and profits this year, and in far more diverse fields. For example the top 50 for this year's Forbes list gives the Bay Area number 3 (Chevron), 9 (Hewlett-Packard), 15 (McKesson; health care), 41 (Wells Fargo; one of the big four banks), 50 (Safeway; food and drugs retailer) while for Houston you have 4 (ConocoPhillips which has posted massive losses this year), 23 (Marathon Oil). And again, the Bay Area has a host of smaller companies that wouldn't make the Fortune list but are successful as well as several private and public institutions that don't have public offerings and thus wouldn't be listed.

I totally went OCD on this.
Exxon Mobil Shipping, Oil exploration, extractions, and chemical divisions is all in Houston. Most of Hewlett Packard workers are located in Houston.

Quote:
Five of the six supermajor energy companies maintain a large base of operations in Houston including the international headquarters of ConocoPhillips; US operational headquarters of Exxon-Mobil; US headquarters for international companies Shell Oil (US subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell located in The Hague, Netherlands), and BP whose international headquarters are in London, England. Chevron has offices in Houston. Houston is also headquarters for the Marathon Oil Corporation, Apache Corporation, and Citgo.
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Old 10-20-2009, 10:41 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,239,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Exxon Mobil Shipping, Oil exploration, extractions, and chemical divisions is all in Houston. Most of Hewlett Packard workers are located in Houston.
...well, those things may be in Houston...but the headquarters are in Irving and Palo Alto.
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:13 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,003 posts, read 23,535,041 times
Reputation: 11564
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Exxon Mobil Shipping, Oil exploration, extractions, and chemical divisions is all in Houston. Most of Hewlett Packard workers are located in Houston.
What happened to you talking about headquarters?

Anyhow, I already said that Houston is the oil capital and you're not addressing the meat of my post. The point is that the Bay Area plays a large part in the oil industry and that the industry is far more geographically spread out than you have put it (refineries, ports, headquarters, r&d, reserves, etc. are all over the map). And you've done a terrible job with wording (headquarters is headquarters; headquarters is not not headquarters). You're talking about divisions, which as important as they are, are not headquarters. There are divisions elsewhere, too, but management and headquarters is actually in Irving, Texas. If you knew this already, why didn't you just word it correctly? Were you trying to slide that little factoid under the rug?

HP has been offshoring manufacturing for a while now, so most of its workers are way elsewhere than Houston. Management/headquarters is still mostly centralized in Palo Alto as is there primary lab/research park. Of course, almost no major corporations have the bulk of their work at headquarters which is what makes bringing up headquarters is silly. Almost all industries are fairly spread out--oil included.

Last edited by OyCrumbler; 10-20-2009 at 11:27 PM..
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,618,808 times
Reputation: 7264
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
What happened to you talking about headquarters?

Anyhow, I already said that Houston is the oil capital and you're not addressing the meat of my post. The point is that the Bay Area plays a large part in the oil industry and that the industry is far more geographically spread out than you have put it (refineries, ports, headquarters, r&d, reserves, etc. are all over the map). And you've done a terrible job with wording (headquarters is headquarters; headquarters is not not headquarters). You're talking about divisions, which as important as they are, are not headquarters. There are divisions elsewhere, too, but management and headquarters is actually in Irving, Texas. If you knew this already, why didn't you just word it correctly? Were you trying to slide that little factoid under the rug?

HP has been offshoring manufacturing for a while now, so most of its workers are way elsewhere than Houston. Management/headquarters is still mostly centralized in Palo Alto as is there primary lab/research park. Of course, almost no major corporations have the bulk of their work at headquarters which is what makes bringing up headquarters is silly. Almost all industries are fairly spread out--oil included.
I had to get to class and I was just addressing Shell and BP when I stated American headquarters.
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Old 10-21-2009, 12:07 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,116,125 times
Reputation: 1406
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post

The point is that the Bay Area plays a large part in the oil industry and that the industry is far more geographically spread out than you have put it
How large of a part does the Bay Area play? I'm just curious.

But anyway, here is a map of most of the country's major oil platforms
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Old 10-21-2009, 01:56 AM
 
Location: Mission Viejo, CA
2,498 posts, read 10,275,453 times
Reputation: 1598
There was a comment earlier about how the "world would stop" without Houston because Houston produces so much oil. The "supermajors" like BP, Chevron, Shell, etc.... control only 5% of the world's oil supply. They are unique in that they are public companies that mainly serve the USA and parts of Europe, but they don't really control that much oil. The other 95% of the oil reserves in the world is owned and under the control of state owned companies.

These state owned companies are heavily concentrated in the Middle East. ExxonMobil has less than 1% of the world's oil. State owned Saudi Aramco for example has 25% of the world's oil reserves. On a global scale, Houston is pretty insignifigant and the world would not stop.
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Old 10-21-2009, 07:08 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,003 posts, read 23,535,041 times
Reputation: 11564
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
I had to get to class and I was just addressing Shell and BP when I stated American headquarters.
Well, you can see why what you wrote doesn't actually say that, right? Regardless, I've already written what significance the American headquarters play. Do you concede that Houston has nowhere near an exclusive hold on energy though?

Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
How large of a part does the Bay Area play? I'm just curious.

But anyway, here is a map of most of the country's major oil platforms
This might give a rough idea of where the oil actually is. Neither Houston nor the Bay Area have the majority though (your map isn't all or even mostly Houston). What the Bay Area has is refineries, r&d (lots of this), corporate headquarters, and ports/distribution--much like what Houston has since the oil itself (the reserves) aren't really in Houston itself.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...WithPlanni.png

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...an_08_0001.png
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