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Old 04-27-2009, 10:58 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,341,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingsley View Post
Why do some describe cities like NYC, Philly, Chicago, D.C., Miami, ect, beautiful cities when there is to me almost nothing naturally appealing about them? Do you find them beautiful? Are they beautiful to you because of thier built environment or what is it?? Just curious.
To get back to the original question, people have very different ideas about what makes a place "beautiful;" you hit the nail on the head when you wrote "there is to me". Beauty is very subjective. I appreciate a nice natural vista, but find the built environment in general to be both more attractive and more visually stimulating. IN NYC's case, I find the buildings attractive, and the parks, and the little things like outdoor cafes, store windows, etc. to add to its beauty. The water is also beautiful, and provides a wonderful natural backdrop. As for Philly, at least the Center City part, there the beauty comes mostly from the buildings, the wonderful walking streets, and the scale. DC's neighborhoods, in particular, have a great deal of beauty, especially in the spring. April in DC is amazing - the trees are all flowering, the houses sparkle in the sun, and it's just an overall wonderful place to walk around. I love NYC, but I think DC in the springtime beats it for sheer beauty.

To me, the built environment, ideally coupled with some natural elements (and most cities are situated on water of some sort, for example) work well as a team to create something beautiful, both from an aesthetic and an experiential standpoint.

P.S. Yes, Griffith Park in LA is one of, if not the, biggest urban parks in the city. We should be happy that so many big cities have chosen to set aside valuable city land to create these types of public outdoor spaces, rather than getting in stupid arguments about which American park is the "most" valuable, especially approaching it from an economic standpoint. Central Park is great, Golden Gate Park is great, Griffith Park is great, etc. Who cares which one is the most financially valuable?
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Old 04-27-2009, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Chicago - mudhole in the prairie...
1,624 posts, read 2,898,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
P.S. Yes, Griffith Park in LA is one of, if not the, biggest urban parks in the city. We should be happy that so many big cities have chosen to set aside valuable city land to create these types of public outdoor spaces, rather than getting in stupid arguments about which American park is the "most" valuable, especially approaching it from an economic standpoint. Central Park is great, Golden Gate Park is great, Griffith Park is great, etc. Who cares which one is the most financially valuable?
Nobody really, but it is amazing when you realize how much money the city is "wasting" by not developing such a fine piece of prime real estate.

PS. I put "waste" quotation marks as I do not believe Central Park is a waste. In summer and winter it is the most amazing and beautiful place in the world.
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Old 04-27-2009, 02:10 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 2,678,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roboto View Post
Flat out lie. You continue to fill your posts with exaggerations and total BS to put down the city of Chicago. You also continue to fail miserably.

FYI, Chicago's Lincoln Park is bigger than Central Park. Lincoln Park - 1200 Ac, Central Park - 843 Ac. Also Golden Gate Park in SF - 1017 Ac.

"Much Bigger" is actually "smaller" in your little world! Thats no surprise. 90% of the garbage you write on here is a complete fabrication anyways.

Not to mention, both Golden Gate and Grant Park do sacrifice plenty of valuable space in the center of their cities, like any park does. Grant Park is adjacent to some of the tallest office buildings in the world. Do you honestly expect anyone to believe that that site would not be developed if it was not reserved for parkland? You say its because Grant Park is on the lakeshore, well, why is it that there are skyscrapers immediately north and south of the park?

Of course theres also lincoln park, which is lined with highrises for over 8 miles. But thats not sacrificing valuable real estate either. Geez where do you come up with this crap? NYC is not the only important and large city in America you know. Nevermind you are clearly delusional, so Im sure you dont know.

BTW, this will hurt your feelings but even my friends who recently visited Chicago from NYC admitted that it is a prettier city than NYC in many respects. They said its cleaner, has better architecture, and has some very interesting qualities with chicago river, and the el slicing through the loop. I love NYC and think its a beautiful city as well, but I happen to agree with them.
Well i think there is kind of a difference. Since you seem to be comparing built up areas im only going to include Manhattan. Manhattan is a 22 sq mi island. There is alot of parkland in Manhattan. Find A Park : New York City Department of Parks & Recreation
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Old 04-27-2009, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Chicago - mudhole in the prairie...
1,624 posts, read 2,898,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roboto View Post
BTW, this will hurt your feelings but even my friends who recently visited Chicago from NYC admitted that it is a prettier city than NYC in many respects. They said its cleaner, has better architecture, and has some very interesting qualities with chicago river, and the el slicing through the loop. .
Right, especially the EL slicing through downtown add some interesting qualities, like when rust falls down on your head or you can't hear yourself thinking when the train passes above your head.
Your friends were just trying to be nice...
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Old 04-27-2009, 03:48 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 2,678,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dementor View Post
Right, especially the EL slicing through downtown add some interesting qualities, like when rust falls down on your head or you can't hear yourself thinking when the train passes above your head.
Your friends were just trying to be nice...
Well be fair. I heard on the news that by taking our subway everyday may make you deaf in the future. Just maybe.
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Old 04-27-2009, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,252,620 times
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Dementor, you should check out CHICAGO CARLESS — The Life and Times of a Former New Yorker Living in Downtown Chicago

It's written by an ex-NYer, now resident of Chicago. His take is basically the opposite of yours. You might find it interesting if you're interested in hearing opposing viewpoints.
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Old 04-27-2009, 03:58 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 2,678,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sukwoo View Post
Dementor, you should check out CHICAGO CARLESS — The Life and Times of a Former New Yorker Living in Downtown Chicago

It's written by an ex-NYer, now resident of Chicago. His take is basically the opposite of yours. You might find it interesting if you're interested in hearing opposing viewpoints.
This guy is hilarious. But i have to say he seems uncool. He seems to over exaggerate things.
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Old 04-27-2009, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,252,620 times
Reputation: 3827
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityGuy View Post
This guy is hilarious. But i have to say he seems uncool. He seems to over exaggerate things.
Which guy? Dementor or the Chicagocarless guy?
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Old 04-27-2009, 06:04 PM
 
464 posts, read 967,899 times
Reputation: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by dementor View Post
Right, especially the EL slicing through downtown add some interesting qualities, like when rust falls down on your head or you can't hear yourself thinking when the train passes above your head.
Your friends were just trying to be nice...
No, I'm pretty sure they are right . When I went to NYC i got REALLY bored in the subway. You just look out the window and stare at the dark concrete wall. With the L, at least you can look out and see the neighborhoods you pass through
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:26 AM
 
14,110 posts, read 22,662,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityGuy View Post
































I like the photo, with the lights that look like a bow wraped around the building. Like a gift.
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