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Old 05-01-2009, 07:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Yes, generally the Catholic church buildings are bigger, but the largest church buildings are almost always Protestant churches. Catholics don't build 5,000+ seat sanctuaries like Protestants do. That's not to say that Catholic churches don't have as many members, they just don't build big churches.

Catholic churches generally have a few different services...i.e. 8 a.m., 10 a.m., Saturday evening, and Sunday evening mass. The sanctuaries aren't usually built to hold all of their members at one service.
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Old 05-01-2009, 12:55 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 7 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Catholic churches generally have a few different services...i.e. 8 a.m., 10 a.m., Saturday evening, and Sunday evening mass. The sanctuaries aren't usually built to hold all of their members at one service.
That is one thing I love about the Catholic Church. Many services at different times of the day. Sunday is the main day to go, and mainly at 11AM, but I like 8am and 5pm services too. Weekday services are something I like. I haven't been able to go for transportation reasons but one of the great things about the Catholic Church is that you can celebrate mass alot.
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Old 05-01-2009, 01:03 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 7 days ago)
 
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I just found this out. Today is May Day, the 1st of May. Today is the feast day of St. Joseph, the patron saint of the worker. May Day is a worker's holiday. Something I find special meaning in.
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Old 05-01-2009, 01:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Catholic churches generally have a few different services...i.e. 8 a.m., 10 a.m., Saturday evening, and Sunday evening mass. The sanctuaries aren't usually built to hold all of their members at one service.
Yeah true, my church has 6 Sunday masses (including the Saturday vigil.) And a Sunday evening mass in a Catholic church differs from a Protestant evening service because in Protestant churches the Sunday evening service is usually not the same as the Sunday morning service. It's usually a different, additional service for people that already went to church that morning. But for Catholics, it's like a "last chance mass" because it's the same mass that went on in the morning and at the Saturday vigil. It's kinda cool to think that my church has a 26 hour time period to catch a mass. The first mass is at 4:30 PM Saturday, the last is at 6:00 PM Sunday.
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Old 05-01-2009, 05:23 PM
 
Location: los angeles
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The other thing about church services is that almost all Catholic parishes have a mass every day [often early in the morning or around noon]. So if you miss Sunday mass you can attend church during the week or on Saturday evening. Makes it very easy to get to church & take communion.
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Old 05-01-2009, 08:22 PM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
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Originally Posted by pirate_lafitte View Post
I just found this out. Today is May Day, the 1st of May. Today is the feast day of St. Joseph, the patron saint of the worker. May Day is a worker's holiday. Something I find special meaning in.
How are you celebrating?

Me and my friends were going to overthrow the bourgeois but instead we fell asleep.
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Old 05-02-2009, 04:51 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I think a lot of cities mentioned are more culturally Catholic then devoutly Catholic. I know lots of Catholics that treat Catholicism like an ethnicity/religion, kinda like being Jewish. They don't believe many of the teachings, but they still consider themselves Catholic because they identify with Catholic culture and their upbringing. I think that many of the "big Catholic" cities are more culturally Catholic than anything. But religiously Catholic, I think some cities like St. Louis, Cincinnati, New Orleans and other cities fit that description. Also, like I mentioned earlier, Catholics in the South seem to be more devout and involved, and they're growing fast. I can see many cities like Raleigh, Charlotte, Atlanta, and Dallas being big, devout Catholic cities in the future.
Maybe, but as far as putting New Orleans in the same boat with St. Louis and Cincinnati, I would disagree. St. Louis and Cincinnati are Midwestern cities, New Orleans is a Southern city. New Orleans also is VERY Catholic for a Southern city. Most Southern cities are more baptist than Catholic.
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Old 05-02-2009, 05:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Maybe, but as far as putting New Orleans in the same boat with St. Louis and Cincinnati, I would disagree. St. Louis and Cincinnati are Midwestern cities, New Orleans is a Southern city. New Orleans also is VERY Catholic for a Southern city. Most Southern cities are more baptist than Catholic.
I wasn't basing it on Southern or Midwestern. I was saying that those cities seem to me to be more religiously Catholic than most other cities. But i'm not sure. Is St. Louis religiously Catholic or more culturally?
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Old 05-02-2009, 09:35 PM
 
Location: The Other California
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I would suggest that Scranton, Pennsylvania, should rank high in terms of Catholic culture and influence. Although the Catholic population of the city is only 33%, the Church is relatively strong there and the Catholics tend to be faithful and observant. In some neighborhoods it seems there is a church on every corner, and a shrine to the Blessed Virgin in every front yard. The national shrine of St. Anne is a pilgrimage destination which brings 50,000 Catholics to the city every year on her feast day.

That said, we Catholics don't really have a city that is thoroughly and faithfully Catholic anymore. The Mormons have SLC, and the Evangelicals have Colorado Springs, but we've got ... nothing. The cities and regions where Catholics are historically numerous are mostly liberal, dissenting, lukewarm and non-observant.

Orthodox and fervent Catholicism today is generally concentrated in historically protestant areas where the Catholic population is well under 15%. I'm thinking of places like Lincoln, Nebraska, which boasts a staunch orthodox bishop, no altar girls, lots of vocations, FSSP seminary, Carmelite nuns, etc.. Also Front Royal, Virginia - an old protestant southern town - which is home to Christendom College, Human Life International, Population Research Institute, a huge Catholic homeschooling community, and a thriving orthodox parish. For those who love the old Latin Mass, traditional Catholics are gathering in places like Post Falls, Idaho and Maple Hill, Kansas - small and conservative protestant towns away from the worst influences of secular culture.
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Old 05-02-2009, 10:46 PM
 
Location: los angeles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WesternPilgrim View Post
I would suggest that Scranton, Pennsylvania, should rank high in terms of Catholic culture and influence. Although the Catholic population of the city is only 33%, the Church is relatively strong there and the Catholics tend to be faithful and observant. In some neighborhoods it seems there is a church on every corner, and a shrine to the Blessed Virgin in every front yard. The national shrine of St. Anne is a pilgrimage destination which brings 50,000 Catholics to the city every year on her feast day.

That said, we Catholics don't really have a city that is thoroughly and faithfully Catholic anymore. The Mormons have SLC, and the Evangelicals have Colorado Springs, but we've got ... nothing. The cities and regions where Catholics are historically numerous are mostly liberal, dissenting, lukewarm and non-observant.

Orthodox and fervent Catholicism today is generally concentrated in historically protestant areas where the Catholic population is well under 15%. I'm thinking of places like Lincoln, Nebraska, which boasts a staunch orthodox bishop, no altar girls, lots of vocations, FSSP seminary, Carmelite nuns, etc.. Also Front Royal, Virginia - an old protestant southern town - which is home to Christendom College, Human Life International, Population Research Institute, a huge Catholic homeschooling community, and a thriving orthodox parish. For those who love the old Latin Mass, traditional Catholics are gathering in places like Post Falls, Idaho and Maple Hill, Kansas - small and conservative protestant towns away from the worst influences of secular culture.
I thought the Shrine to St. Anne was in Canada somewhere [maybe near Montreal?].

I live in what is considered a "liberal" archdiocese if there is such a thing, that has a strong Catholic presence. Can't remember the last mayor who wasn't Catholic [same for state governor]. Parishes are full & beyond what a priest can handle. Lots of city events happen at the cathedral & the cardinal has a high-profile within Los Angeles.
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