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Old 07-22-2014, 11:03 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MCollins09 View Post
I got this idea from the Mormon cities thread. Which cities are known for being more devoutly Catholic? I know there are pleanty of cities that have large Catholic populations, but i'm talking about cities that aren't just Catholic in a cultural sense (like Boston) but Catholic in a religious sense as well. -A city where many people still go to mass every Sunday and don't disagree with the church on most issues. I would like to know if there is a city that is almost like the Bible Belt for Catholics. Does a city like this exist in the US?
The majority of American Catholics are far more liberal than the Vatican is, so--beyond aging members of the laity--I honestly don't think there's a major American city that meets your description. Or at least not one that I've been to and or lived in.

That disconnect, by the way, can also extend to the certain members of the clergy and the America's nuns as well. I'm personally related to one such nun.
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Old 07-22-2014, 11:13 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
St. Louis seems like the Catholic version of a Bible Belt city. It seems to have as much Catholic influence on it as the Southern Baptists have on Memphis. The influence is much less now than what it used to be (in both cities, im sure), but there's still influence none the less.

Here's some numbers from 2000 that we can compare:
Shelby County (Memphis)- 17% Southern Baptist. 10% loss since 1990.
*Black Baptists were not included, but i'd say they're another 20% of the population.
St. Louis city- 20% Catholic. 22% loss since 1990.
St. Louis county- 30% Catholic. 5% loss since 1990.

Im sure white-flight plays a large role in the losses for both cities. Interesting to note that the number and percentage of Catholics in Shelby county is comparable to the number and percentage of Southern Baptists in St. Louis county.

Just wondering, how are the Catholic churches in St. Louis, are they well-attended? Do most Catholics attend mass regularly?
First, I just want to point out that the city of St. Louis isn't in St. Louis County. The two are separate entities.

As for church attendance, it's declined. The people who are typically the most faithful (no pun intended) in regards to their attendance are typically older. That's not to say that younger and middle aged people don't go, but it's usually the elderly who are there every Sunday, and sometimes more, in regards to their consistency.

Enrollment in Catholic grade schools is also down. It's gotten to the point that some schools have had to close their doors and be merged with other schools in the metro area.

St. Louis might have similar numbers to Memphis when it comes to Baptists, but I've met a Baptist from Memphis who told me about his "mega" church back home, in addition to the type of place that Memphis is for the religious Baptists there. I can honestly tell you that St. Louis is nothing like Memphis in that way. It's highly doubtful that even the most devout Catholic in St. Louis would argue with you in regards to how old scientists think the Earth is, but that's simply not true in Memphis. My friend was literally taught at his church that the Earth is something like 4,000 to 5,000 years old. Meanwhile I went to a Catholic high school that taught evolution.

It's been also my experience in general that Catholics--even the super devout ones--are almost as never in your face about their faith as certain Protestant sects.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I wasn't basing it on Southern or Midwestern. I was saying that those cities seem to me to be more religiously Catholic than most other cities. But i'm not sure. Is St. Louis religiously Catholic or more culturally?
It's a mix of both to be perfectly honest. It's been my experience that the Catholic experience here in Chicago doesn't differ all that much from how it does back in St. Louis. I went to a Catholic grade school and high school in the St. Louis area and the I attended a Catholic university in Chicago.
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Old 07-23-2014, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
The traditional Northeast has, by far, the highest Catholic population in the country (as a %). Boston, New York City, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh are all heavily Catholic.
I'd also add the State of Maryland and Los Angeles and San Francisco.
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Philly
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I was a student in the archdiocese of philadelphia and will say that in educational terms the high schools are all very proud and are competitive if not better then public schools. There also are very good private catholic high schools in the area. The basilica of saint peter and Paul is beautiful and in a great location (Ben Franklin parkway) downtown. There are also many beautiful churches within and outside philly. Overall I feel the presence of the Catholic Church is an important part of phillys culture.
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Old 07-23-2014, 11:06 PM
 
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Probably Brownsville, McAllen, San Antonio, Laredo, Los Angeles, El Paso, or any other city with a largely Hispanic population.
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Old 07-25-2014, 09:15 AM
 
260 posts, read 234,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
Probably Brownsville, McAllen, San Antonio, Laredo, Los Angeles, El Paso, or any other city with a largely Hispanic population.

Disagree. This is based on me living in San Antonio and going to Rio Grand Valley,(Brownsville McAllen ect..... for those unfamiliar with that part of TX), region often. There is a large portion of Mexicans in this region who are protestant and proud to be so. There are even pentecostal Mexicans. I know people see stereotypes in the media about Mexicans and Catholicism and think "big population of Mexicans must be catholic", this is just not true at least for this region.
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Old 07-27-2014, 08:15 AM
 
9,258 posts, read 5,134,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philly215610 View Post
I was a student in the archdiocese of philadelphia and will say that in educational terms the high schools are all very proud and are competitive if not better then public schools. There also are very good private catholic high schools in the area. The basilica of saint peter and Paul is beautiful and in a great location (Ben Franklin parkway) downtown. There are also many beautiful churches within and outside philly. Overall I feel the presence of the Catholic Church is an important part of phillys culture.
Additionally two American saints were Philadelphians: Saint John Neumann and Saint Katherine Drexel.

Add, too, the selection of Philadelphia as the first American site of the 2015 World Meeting of Families could have happened because of the long history of Catholicism in the city and area.
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Old 07-27-2014, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Cedar Rapids
233 posts, read 279,042 times
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Dubuque is the smallest city in the country to have it's own Ecclesiastical Province. For those of you who don't know - each archdiocese lies within an Ecclesiastical province as part of a greater organized region. The city of Dubuque is 53% Catholic.

Chicago and it's suburbs (Joliet comes to mind) are very Catholic, as well as the Milwaukee area. One could almost say that in a pre-hispanic influx United States, the Catholic "belt" overlapped with the rust belt quite nicely - with many exceptions of course.

Clearly you cannot rule out California, but if you are talking about the historical White Catholic cities, I would look to many parts of the Midwest, Great Lakes, and Northeastern States and cities along the Great Lakes.
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Old 07-27-2014, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Cedar Rapids
233 posts, read 279,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonTy View Post
There are even pentecostal Mexicans.
This is actually becoming a catastrophic loss to the Catholic church globally. Countries in all parts of Central and Southern America are losing Catholic followers who are converting to Pentecostalism. Pentecostalism seems to have less of a dogma as it is more-so a movement with hundreds and hundreds of small churches within it.

The most interesting part of this is the largely emerging Charismatic/"Pentecostal" movement within the Catholic church itself.
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