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Old 04-24-2009, 03:53 PM
 
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I'd say the Midwest is where you'd find the most devout Catholics. St. Louis is a very Catholic city. I think they have more Catholic high schools than any other city. I also hear that the Diocese of Lincoln is the most conservative in the country. I have friends in Chicago that says it's pretty Catholic, even though it seems secular to everyone else.

I wouldn't discount the South. The number of Catholics in the South & Southwest is growing fast. Some of the largest Catholic churches in the US are there. I read that the largest church of any denomination in North Carolina is St. Matthew's (http://www.stmatthewcatholic.org/index.cfm/about - broken link) in Charlotte. According to their website, they have 25,000 registered members. Which I think is just ridiculously big. Then there's St. Ann's near Dallas with 28,000 registered members, and most of the parishoners aren't Hispanic. These churches often have more contemporary music, so they kinda feel like megachurches. Catholic churches like these (though usually not as big) can usually be found in NC, Atlanta, Texas, and Arizona.

Last edited by Smtchll; 04-24-2009 at 04:02 PM..
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Old 04-24-2009, 04:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I'd say the Midwest is where you'd find the most devout Catholics. St. Louis is a very Catholic city. I think they have more Catholic high schools than any other city. I also hear that the Diocese of Lincoln is the most conservative in the country. I have friends in Chicago that says it's pretty Catholic, even though it seems secular to everyone else.

I wouldn't discount the South. The number of Catholics in the South & Southwest is growing fast. Some of the largest Catholic churches in the US are there. I read that the largest church of any denomination in North Carolina is St. Matthew's (http://www.stmatthewcatholic.org/index.cfm/about - broken link) in Charlotte. According to their website, they have 25,000 registered members. Which I think is just ridiculously big. Then there's St. Ann's near Dallas with 28,000 registered members, and most of the parishoners aren't Hispanic. These churches often have more contemporary music, so they kinda feel like megachurches. Catholic churches like these (though usually not as big) can usually be found in NC, Atlanta, Texas, and Arizona.
St. Louis was known as "Rome of the West" because of its Catholic churches.

As for the South, New Orleans is decidedly Catholic. I should know. I was born in New Orleans.
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Old 04-24-2009, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Jersey
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Staten Island.
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Old 04-24-2009, 04:26 PM
Status: "Game recognized game from the start" (set 20 days ago)
 
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Another group people are sleeping on are Lebanese. That's right. Look up Maronite Catholics. Waterville Maine, the Detroit area and Utica NY have quite a few, relatively speaking.

Maronite Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 04-24-2009, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Central Louisiana
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South Louisiana is heavily Catholic where Cajuns and Creoles live. North Louisiana is majority Protestant.
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Old 04-24-2009, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Teaneck, NJ
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Lyndhurst, Nj i know is a very catholic town.
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Old 04-24-2009, 05:32 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Another group people are sleeping on are Lebanese. That's right. Look up Maronite Catholics. Waterville Maine, the Detroit area and Utica NY have quite a few, relatively speaking.

Maronite Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Lebanese make up a sizeable population in the Detroit area as well.
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Old 04-24-2009, 05:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Rmaf623 View Post
South Louisiana is heavily Catholic where Cajuns and Creoles live. North Louisiana is majority Protestant.
You are correct. Not only that, Louisiana stands out in the Southeast USA as as having a relatively large Spaniard population, Croatian population, Italian population, and Vietnamese population, especially in Plaquemines Parish. Spain, Croatia, Italy are Catholic countries. Vietnam even has a sizeable Catholic population. Louisiana was home to a relatively sizeable Filipino population in the early 20th century. The Philipines is the most Catholic nation in Asia.
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Old 04-24-2009, 07:16 PM
 
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Default Any city that attracted immigrants..

...from Europe in the late 19-early 20th centuries, especially Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Louis, and to a lesser extent Minneapolis (besides the Protestant Scandinavians and roughly one-half of the German population). These are the cities to which hundreds of thousands of Irish, Italian, Polish, other Slavic groups, and many Germans immigrated to. Today, of course, you can add the millions of immigrants of Spanish heritage, and now many large metro areas in the Southwest can be added as well.
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Old 04-24-2009, 07:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
...from Europe in the late 19-early 20th centuries, especially Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Louis, and to a lesser extent Minneapolis (besides the Protestant Scandinavians and roughly one-half of the German population). These are the cities to which hundreds of thousands of Irish, Italian, Polish, other Slavic groups, and many Germans immigrated to. Today, of course, you can add the millions of immigrants of Spanish heritage, and now many large metro areas in the Southwest can be added as well.
Very true. Immigration has brought a large Catholic influence to the USA.
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