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Old 06-20-2009, 09:24 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,210,681 times
Reputation: 2779

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Laugh away. Statics don't alway tell the truth, especially when they are averages.
Look at those two maps I posted based on the 2000 census. Do you not notice that majority of metro NOLA is 5000< people per sq mi or either 50 and below. Notice that Atlanta's area is more evenly in the 1000-2500 sq mi to 2500-5000 sq mi range.

Look at this, then look at an aerial view of the Atlanta are, if you can't see the difference with your own eyes you might want to reconsider what you are laughing at.

Laugh on DeaconJ, laugh on.

P.S. there is no way in hell that Atlanta is not more evenly distributed than NOLA. Last time I checked the 500,000+ residents of Atlanta were not all crammed into a corner of about 1/3 to 1/4 the size of the entire city limits.
You're wrong, so move on. You're making a joke of yourself arguing something like this.
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:29 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,100,125 times
Reputation: 1405
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
You're wrong, so move on. You're making a joke of yourself arguing something like this.
Ok DeaconJ. lol
And I'm wrong how again? Oh, because you said so.

You're right though when you say this shouldn't be argued. NOLA denser than ATL should be common sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Thank you for proving my point...Atlanta's density is certainly not uniform throughout the city. There are areas of high density and areas of low denisty - just like in New Orleans.
He actually proved my point, not yours.

And you still don't get it. Atlanta has areas of high and areas of low (the majority of which is inhabitable/developable land.) New Orleans has areas of high density or no density at all. (all inhabitable land is developed, the other 3/4 of the city is water and swamp.) Compared to NO, atlanta is uniform. (spread out vs. squeezed in a corner.) The lowest density of NO's developed areas would rank with the mid-high density ares in developed ATL.

As stupid as arguing this point is, I think I'll continue. Can you even name a major city in this country that is less dense than Atlanta. Statistics are faulty on this one because the majority of them measure the total size of the area, not where the actual people are.

What in the Atlanta area is even dense other than Buckhead, Midtown, and Downtown?

Last edited by WestbankNOLA; 06-20-2009 at 09:57 AM..
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:42 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,689,470 times
Reputation: 11096
[quote=urbancharlotte;9363944]Are you upset that Raleigh is not in the running on this thread?

No.

Raleigh doesn't need any more hype. It has all it needs.
Oh, by the way, Raleigh really isn't competing with Charlotte. Just like (I'm sure) the people in Charlotte don't think about the Triangle, the vast majority of people in the Triangle really don't think about Charlotte. There are so many people in Raleigh from other states and many of them either don't know where Charlotte is or haven't been there.
The two cities have different economies and that is really what sets the stage for any competition.
I will say this though. There is a general amusement in the Triangle for how important Charlotte thinks it is or important it wants to be. Also, the general sentiment is that Charlotte wants to be Atlanta. And, for the life of me and others, we can't understand why.
I have been to Charlotte and I think it's a nice place. I wouldn't live there but I think it's nice.
I wish the city luck in its future and I hope it has a bright future.

Last edited by rnc2mbfl; 06-20-2009 at 09:56 AM..
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:44 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,689,470 times
Reputation: 11096
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Are you upset that Raleigh is not in the running on this thread?

BTW (like I have told MANY others) the videos labeled "Urban Charlotte" (three of them) were normal nights. Three were this past New Years and one was the Bobcats train leaving uptown. In other words, what you thought was a special night half of the time was not LOL!!! Thanks for the compliment!!!
Frankly, I didn't watch them all.
And, if one was a crowd leaving a bball game...well....that's no big deal. It's a special event. Special event crowds move like herds.
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:48 AM
 
Location: State College,PA
275 posts, read 541,396 times
Reputation: 220
Definitely, Miami.
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:51 AM
 
6,269 posts, read 9,979,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Frankly, I didn't watch them all.
And, if one was a crowd leaving a bball game...well....that's no big deal. It's a special event. Special event crowds move like herds.
You have no clue what a weekend in Charlotte is like do you?LOL It's ok Raleigh will get there in about 30 years. Just be patient grasshopper.
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Old 06-20-2009, 10:05 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,210,681 times
Reputation: 2779
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Ok DeaconJ. lol
And I'm wrong how again? Oh, because you said so.

You're right though when you say this shouldn't be argued. NOLA denser than ATL should be common sense.



He actually proved my point, not yours.

And you still don't get it. Atlanta has areas of high and areas of low (the majority of which is inhabitable/developable land.) New Orleans has areas of high density or no density at all. (all inhabitable land is developed, the other 3/4 of the city is water and swamp.) Compared to NO, atlanta is uniform. (spread out vs. squeezed in a corner.) The lowest density of NO's developed areas would rank with the mid-high density ares in developed ATL.

As stupid as arguing this point is, I think I'll continue. Can you even name a major city in this country that is less dense than Atlanta. Statistics are faulty on this one because the majority of them measure the total size of the area, not where the actual people are.

What in the Atlanta area is even dense other than Buckhead, Midtown, and Downtown?
NO....you said "New Orleans SUBURBS are more dense than the city of Atlanta" - that is just a ridiculous statement. Don't try to change the argument...New Orleans suburbs ARE NOT more dense than the city of Atlanta. Period. You may know what you're talking about when it comes to New Orleans, but you don't have a clue what you're talking about when it come to Atlanta.


And this is what he said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780
Atlanta has low density numbers because while it has small city limits (131 right?) it can be very spread out and empty in parts unlike NO where the city is built very dense and compact.
Atlanta can be very spread out AND EMPTY IN PARTS. So...its density is not uniform, as you stated earlier. It's dense in some parts, not so much in others. How did he support YOUR point?
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Old 06-20-2009, 10:12 AM
 
1,201 posts, read 1,978,938 times
Reputation: 717
Talking three little pigs, chkicken little, and the big, bad wolf take a trip around the world.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
I can agree with that. Charlotte is without a doubt closer to Atlanta in layout. Houston is more urban due to uptown and downtown Houston. It is almost like two cities in one.

When I brought up Houston, I was only using it as an example of why it is not wise to make bold statements about the downtown areas of tier 1 southern cities (especially when there is a top 25 downtown thread going on that ranks Nashville and Charlotte's downtowns ahead of Houston and Dallas). The difference to me is the development outside of downtown. I called that development sprawl because the points of interests are rather far apart (too far for walking and tend to have tooooo much surface parking). You called that development urban because it can compete with the downtowns of cities like Charlotte. Trust me, I understand the difference between tier 1 and tier 2 southern cities. The difference is outside of downtown. You call it urban. I call it sprawl. Either way, we are talking about the same thing.

There is a poster here who suggested that the difference was within downtown and I called him out on it because I knew from first hand experience that he was wrong. Before I saw tier 1 southern cities in person, I would have foolishly agreed with this poster simply because I would not have known any better.
i've just gotten to this post, as i have been away for a few days, and i am just now playing "catch up." if, by chance, you are referring to me, and, if you take the offensive position of "calling me out", i would take issue w/ your inaccurate perception. first, anyone who travels in the u.s./world knows, when one gets off the plane, they are in a tier one city. these folks don't have to stumble around blindly, like a chicken hit in the head w/ a wet cob or as if lost in a hail storm, looking for evidence of such. tier one cities in the u.s. have existed, for the most part, for at least 50 years. their downtowns are established and are not going away. their downtowns are significant to the city as a whole---sprawl does not diminish nor marglinalize the downtowns of these tier one cities. tier ones, simply, "are!" tier 1 cities exist in all sections of the u.s. they have for years.

miami, atlanta, houston, and dallas are in a league separate from all tier 2 cities, regardless of the area of the country. they qualify for tier 1 cities because of their downtowns, their metro populations, their city amenities, their extensive urban histories, and their recognition factors. like it or no, that is the reality. for those who travel, you clearly see the difference, as you come into the sanctity of these hallowed places. now, genuflect to the urbanites and their world experiences.

it is embarassing and ludicrous---and a bit more than hokey--to put forth an argument that austin, charlotte, and nashville are near the dipping pool of tier 1 cities. st. louis, kansas city, new orleans, memphis, and louisville stand quite firmly before these little gals could seriously be ranked. i know there are cheerleaders who want so badly to put them in that league---SORRY! ain't happening for a number of reasons. city data and bought forums help to skew an advance of their buzz agendas; however, careful dissection puts them squarely into the realm of tier 2. like a fine wine, they cannot be considered before their time. attacking and/or killing a messenger will not prevent the delivery of an accurate message. truth and reality are always the best defense.

Last edited by kingchef; 06-20-2009 at 10:28 AM..
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Old 06-20-2009, 10:15 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,100,125 times
Reputation: 1405
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
NO....you said "New Orleans SUBURBS are more dense than the city of Atlanta" - that is just a ridiculous statement. Don't try to change the argument...New Orleans suburbs ARE NOT more dense than the city of Atlanta. Period.
You changed the argument not me.

New Orleans suburbs are denser than the suburbs of ATLANTA period.
Your web browser and the Maps site are incompatible
MapQuest Maps - Driving Directions - Map
Google Maps
Yahoo! Maps, Driving Directions, and Traffic

Take a look. If that's not enough, there are two big colorful maps a couple pages back with density of both areas.

New Orleans suburbs are crammed in just like the city itself. There are simply more people per sq mi in those developed areas with the exception of Mandeville.
In the Atlanta suburbs you get, cul de sacs, pine trees and open space. In the New Orleans suburbs you get concrete, endless lines of apartments and houses stacked among each other until you hit the lake or river, hardly no grass or trees. The actual city of NO is greener then the suburbs.

Unless Atlanta metro has a couple of 1000 people living in those trees and in the hills, there is no way it can be denser.

Looking at Metairie, Kenner, Gretna, Harvey, Marrero, Westwego, etc. (some cities for you to view on the sites above) you would think you were in a dirty version of Houston.

Why do you think Atlanta's area is so wide? Because it is so spread out. (spread= less dense)

Last edited by WestbankNOLA; 06-20-2009 at 10:24 AM..
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Old 06-20-2009, 10:15 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,689,470 times
Reputation: 11096
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Miami is a southern city...it's culture is a variation of general southern culture, much like the cultures of southern Louisiana, the Outer Banks of North Carolina, the D.C. suburbs of Northern Virginia, and other specific areas that have become culturally different from what most consider "southern culture".

This list could go on and on, but some of the southern culture that is found in Miami:

1. a major NASCAR presence at the Homestead-Miami Motor Speedway
2. a huge college football following, along with a college football powerhouse team
3. over 200 Baptist Church congregations (baptist churches in Miami, FL on Yahoo! Local)
4. 151 barbecue restaurants (Miami Barbecue Restaurants | Urbanspoon)
5. 71 southern and soul food restaurants (Miami Southern & Soul Restaurants | Urbanspoon)
6. more than 23,000 people directly involved in agriculture in South Florida(Everglades Restoration: Agriculture Affected by South Florida Program?)
7. over 1,000 farms in Dade County alone in 1997:


Number of Farms

First of all, Homestead (where the speedway is) is so far South of the city of Miami that it doesn't even feel like it belongs in the County. The motorspeedway is there. The farms are also there (including the alligator ones). The very southern part of MiamiDade County feels decidely different than the rest of the county. And, while it definitely has more Southern culture than the rest of the county, its influence is neglible to non-existent once you are out of that specific area. And, since that area of the county is more rural and less populated, its ability to influence a county of 2.4 million people is an uphill battle at best.
Regarding football, I have to completely disagree. In my opinion, the fan support sucks for the local teams (Dolphins & Miami Hurricanes). This is especially true for the Hurricanes. I have been to many, many games there where the old stadium was half empty. Their fans don't go to games unless it's a big rivalry game like FSU, UF or a powerhouse program.
While "American" culture is definitely secondary to the variety and totality of Latin cultures in Miami, there is a fairly significant African American Culture in Miami. And, like AA's in other parts of the South, they are heavily represented in the Baptist Church. But, I'd guess that their numbers don't even come close the number of Catholics in the Miami. Catholicism is decidedly NOT Southern outside some very specific areas like NOLA. There's also a huge Jewish community in Miami: another very non-southern religion. MiamiDade has the highest percentage of foreign born residents. It's over 50%. I could go on and on....
So, what I am trying to say is: even though Miami has some Southern influences in its culture, those influences are not nearly strong enough to cultivate a Southern Culture for the city.

Last edited by rnc2mbfl; 06-20-2009 at 11:24 AM..
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