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Old 11-11-2009, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,604,387 times
Reputation: 7259

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdvaden View Post
Again, I think that the west coast states are the answer. We are not just talking favorite here, but diversity. Many people posted states that have impressive features, but if we are talking about the number for landscape features in an area ...

Probably California, but maybe Washington or Oregon.

They have:

Forests
Rainforests
Mountains
Rivers
Marsh or bog areas
Desert area
Canyons
Waterfalls
Prairies
Caves
Volcanoes
Beaches
Dunes
Lava Beds
Lakes
Hardwood forests
Monoliths
Rocky Buttes
Lava Tubes
Urban centers
Agricultural areas
Orchards
Vineyards
River rapids
Gorges
Fossil beds



Some of the features are not huge, though some are, but they are virtually all there.
I never knew the West Coast was a state.
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Old 11-12-2009, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Oregon
1,458 posts, read 5,252,552 times
Reputation: 1410
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
I never knew the West Coast was a state.
I didn't either. Did your read the post? Because I did not edit "states" at any time. California was my first mention. But either Washington, or Oregon, have virtually everything on that list as individuals. Take monoliths - Beacon Rock for WA and Haystack Rock for OR. And El Capitan for CA. CA and WA have rainforests, and I'm pretty sure Oregon has one temperate rainforest too.

Lava Tubes > One mile cave in Oregon, Lava Beds Nat. Monument in CA, and Ape Cave in WA. Mt. Hood in OR is a dormant volcano, St. Helens in WA is active, and CA has some too.

So that list was not Oregon, Washington and California combined. That list for the more part, is applicable to each individual state - OR, WA and CA

What's the deal, you never been out to the Pacific coast states before?
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Old 11-12-2009, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,204,765 times
Reputation: 1802
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdvaden View Post
I didn't either. Did your read the post? Because I did not edit "states" at any time. California was my first mention. But either Washington, or Oregon, have virtually everything on that list as individuals. Take monoliths - Beacon Rock for WA and Haystack Rock for OR. And El Capitan for CA. CA and WA have rainforests, and I'm pretty sure Oregon has one temperate rainforest too.

Lava Tubes > One mile cave in Oregon, Lava Beds Nat. Monument in CA, and Ape Cave in WA. Mt. Hood in OR is a dormant volcano, St. Helens in WA is active, and CA has some too.

So that list was not Oregon, Washington and California combined. That list for the more part, is applicable to each individual state - OR, WA and CA

What's the deal, you never been out to the Pacific coast states before?
I agree that the West Coast states are the most diverse in terrain\ topography. BTW, I don't think California has what would be considered "rainforests." Oregon is more likely to have rainforests than California but Washington has the most extensive rainforests of any state.
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Old 11-12-2009, 09:02 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,231,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
I agree that the West Coast states are the most diverse in terrain\ topography. BTW, I don't think California has what would be considered "rainforests." Oregon is more likely to have rainforests than California but Washington has the most extensive rainforests of any state.
Are we counting Hawaii as a state? They have some major rainforests there.
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Old 11-12-2009, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,204,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Are we counting Hawaii as a state? They have some major rainforests there.
You might be right about Hawaii but Washington is a much larger state.
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Old 11-12-2009, 09:28 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,231,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
You might be right about Hawaii but Washington is a much larger state.
True...but I do think that Hawaii has more expansive rainforests. I could be wrong.
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Old 11-12-2009, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Spain
1,855 posts, read 4,278,702 times
Reputation: 943
Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
I agree that the West Coast states are the most diverse in terrain\ topography. BTW, I don't think California has what would be considered "rainforests." Oregon is more likely to have rainforests than California but Washington has the most extensive rainforests of any state.
For the record, California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska all have temperate rainforest.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific...(WWF_ecoregion)
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Old 11-12-2009, 09:44 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,231,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
True...but I do think that Hawaii has more expansive rainforests. I could be wrong.
Yep, I think I was wrong. I learned something new - plus I learned that there are rainforests in GA/NC/TN/VA! Temperate rainforest - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


A map showing the areas of temperate rain forests
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Old 11-13-2009, 01:22 AM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,691,882 times
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Can anybody post some Texas pics?
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Old 11-13-2009, 01:57 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 6,870,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthmoreAve View Post
Keep your (nice) volcanoes and "rainforests"(air quote because not a tropical rainforest), but here in Texas, its like a whole 'nother country.
It's like a whole 'nother country here too.

And the Pacific Northwest is home to the areas that have the highest annual rainfall totals of any state outside of Hawaii. 12 to 14 FEET of rain in the Hoh temperate rain forest and other smaller areas in Oregon and Washington (and possible the parts of the Humboldt County?). About 50 inches (a little over 4 feet) of annual precipitation is required to be considered a temperate rain forest. I think we can say safely that we DO have rain forest here... 14 feet of rain is quite a bit.
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