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Old 05-09-2009, 06:51 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,771 posts, read 21,080,213 times
Reputation: 9358

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By Portland OR meaning an environmentally conscious metro area with a strict urban growth boundary (which limits sprawl), and where cycling and hiking are popular activities

For the "True": side...

- Areas immediately south and east of Downtown Louisville are very "San Francisco-esque" - tons of coffee houses, pubs, oddity shops along the city's Victorian era turnpikes

- Bicycles are extremely popular in Louisville. The city is currently constructing 150 miles of new bike trails, including a 110 miles loop around the city (40 miles of it are already complete)

- Louisville features one of the nation's best park systems with three 400+ acre parks connect by 40 miles of tree lined "parkways", most of which have bike/ jogging lanes. This original park system was designed by Frederick Olmstead, the creator of NYC's Central Park. L'ville also has the largest municipal forest in the nation, which has 50 miles of hiking trails

- Louisville is ending suburban sprawl within its boundaries by making all land not already developed part of a series of city parks and wildlife management areas. When complete nearly one FOURTH of Jefferson County will be parkland

What thinkest thou? Is Louisville the next Portland, even a mini San Francisco -- or -- is it just Birmingham AL with some new bike trails?
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Old 05-09-2009, 07:21 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,771 posts, read 21,080,213 times
Reputation: 9358
For people that haven't been to "The 'Ville" here are some photos highlighting the "San Francisco lite" qualities of Louisville

New urban developments





L'ville's urban shopping corridors

















Great Victorian architecture







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Old 05-10-2009, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,916,282 times
Reputation: 2124
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
By Portland OR meaning an environmentally conscious metro area with a strict urban growth boundary (which limits sprawl), and where cycling and hiking are popular activities

For the "True": side...

- Areas immediately south and east of Downtown Louisville are very "San Francisco-esque" - tons of coffee houses, pubs, oddity shops along the city's Victorian era turnpikes

- Bicycles are extremely popular in Louisville. The city is currently constructing 150 miles of new bike trails, including a 110 miles loop around the city (40 miles of it are already complete)

- Louisville features one of the nation's best park systems with three 400+ acre parks connect by 40 miles of tree lined "parkways", most of which have bike/ jogging lanes. This original park system was designed by Frederick Olmstead, the creator of NYC's Central Park. L'ville also has the largest municipal forest in the nation, which has 50 miles of hiking trails

- Louisville is ending suburban sprawl within its boundaries by making all land not already developed part of a series of city parks and wildlife management areas. When complete nearly one FOURTH of Jefferson County will be parkland

What thinkest thou? Is Louisville the next Portland, even a mini San Francisco -- or -- is it just Birmingham AL with some new bike trails?
I don't know about the East side but around here you hardly see anyone on bikes on that trail, they are there but few and far between. As far as keeping sprawl down, the majority of the Greenbelt is up for sale for residences and commercial use. They'll have to change the name when they cut down all the green. Yet another reason I don't believe in the so-called "merger".
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Old 05-10-2009, 08:23 AM
 
4,570 posts, read 6,530,457 times
Reputation: 2537
What Louisville needs thought is a light rail system.
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Old 05-10-2009, 09:19 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,288,069 times
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Louisville is a historic city with its own vibe, so it should be creating its own brand.
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Old 05-10-2009, 10:01 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,493,959 times
Reputation: 5656
false, the west coast version of liberal and what is going on in portland is so far ahead and so far to the left of the cities in the southeast that claim to have "liberal vibes" like athens, asheville, austin, tallahassee, gainesville it isn't even in same city league... so maybe louisville could become another austin or asheville... but not portland. the cities over here are moderate at best due to what they are surrounded by.
I don't think Louisville is anything like SF either.
You can have all the coffee shops and pubs and stuff you want...but its the people who make up the city. Pretty much every decent size cities have a lot of pubs and coffee shops at this point. The southeast midsize cities are largely playing catch up to the coasts and north like chi/minny/milwaukee.

That being said, Louisville is fine on its own and has tons of its own history, I went down there a few times while living in Chicago... I think it should promote that instead of trying to be another city.
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Old 05-10-2009, 10:17 AM
 
Location: yeah
5,716 posts, read 14,539,114 times
Reputation: 2822
1. That looks nothing like San Francisco.

2. Appearance is not the essence of being.

3. Why bring up SF when Portland is the gauge by which you measure? Other than fashionable radicalism, those two aren't very similar.
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Old 05-10-2009, 10:47 AM
 
Location: SF,CA
186 posts, read 382,041 times
Reputation: 222
I like Louisville but I have to ask, have you ever spent time in SF or Portland?
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Old 05-10-2009, 11:50 AM
 
Location: NJ
327 posts, read 946,801 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
By Portland OR meaning an environmentally conscious metro area with a strict urban growth boundary (which limits sprawl), and where cycling and hiking are popular activities

For the "True": side...

- Areas immediately south and east of Downtown Louisville are very "San Francisco-esque" - tons of coffee houses, pubs, oddity shops along the city's Victorian era turnpikes

- Bicycles are extremely popular in Louisville. The city is currently constructing 150 miles of new bike trails, including a 110 miles loop around the city (40 miles of it are already complete)

- Louisville features one of the nation's best park systems with three 400+ acre parks connect by 40 miles of tree lined "parkways", most of which have bike/ jogging lanes. This original park system was designed by Frederick Olmstead, the creator of NYC's Central Park. L'ville also has the largest municipal forest in the nation, which has 50 miles of hiking trails

- Louisville is ending suburban sprawl within its boundaries by making all land not already developed part of a series of city parks and wildlife management areas. When complete nearly one FOURTH of Jefferson County will be parkland

What thinkest thou? Is Louisville the next Portland, even a mini San Francisco -- or -- is it just Birmingham AL with some new bike trails?
thank you for posting this, i had no idea Louisville is so environmentally conscious about its sprawl. I have a new found liking to Louisville. good thread
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Old 05-10-2009, 08:09 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,771 posts, read 21,080,213 times
Reputation: 9358
Quote:
Originally Posted by nature's message View Post
What Louisville needs thought is a light rail system.
I think what American cities need is to bring street cars back and get rid of all those diesel belching buses . Light rail is an expensive way to move rich White people from the suburbs to downtown. Street cars are what the areas in the pictured areas of Louisville originally grew around anyway (the so called "Street Car Suburb") so the infrastructure is already suited to it
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