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View Poll Results: Which is LESS southern, Austin or NOVA(North Virginia)?
Austin 34 21.38%
North Virginia 125 78.62%
Voters: 159. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-01-2009, 09:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frodo2008 View Post
You're right. N. VA and Austin are both blue places and not so southern anymore. Yes Richmond was the headquarters of the Confederacy and 87% of Virginians identify themselves as southerners. That's a pretty overwhelming majority. N. VA still has southern qualities. It's a long way from NYC.
I agree. Liberal doesn't mean Northern. NoVa may be liberal, but it still looks somewhat Southern to me. As far as accents go, it's not very Southern. But geographically, and with all the pine trees and what not, it still looked Southern when I drove through, as compared to Austin in which CACTUS grows wild in the Austin area.
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Old 10-01-2009, 09:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
I agree. Liberal doesn't mean Northern. NoVa may be liberal, but it still looks somewhat Southern to me. As far as accents go, it's not very Southern. But geographically, and with all the pine trees and what not, it still looked Southern when I drove through, as compared to Austin in which CACTUS grows wild in the Austin area.
My neighbors have cactus in their yard, and I have a yucca. Neither is uncommon, especially as you go further south from Atlanta into South Fulton and Clayton Counties. Of course they are more common around Austin, but not uncommon in other states around the South, particularly in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal regions.

I do agree with you that NOVA is much more like the South that most people stereotypically imagine. All of Virginia has a funky accent...it sounds almost Canadian-like compared to Alabama. There are all kinds of different accents throughout the South, but they are still southern. NOVA is no exception.

Last edited by DeaconJ; 10-01-2009 at 10:06 PM..
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Old 10-01-2009, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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If NOVA is Southern, the residents of Fairfax County, Arlington, and Alexandria do not know it.
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Old 10-01-2009, 10:32 PM
 
Location: At the center of the universe!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
I agree. Liberal doesn't mean Northern. NoVa may be liberal, but it still looks somewhat Southern to me. As far as accents go, it's not very Southern. But geographically, and with all the pine trees and what not, it still looked Southern when I drove through, as compared to Austin in which CACTUS grows wild in the Austin area.
East of Austin is pretty green but yeah in the immediate Austin area you don't have a pine forest like you do in most of the south. You do have the Lost Pines though between Smithville and Bastrop. Those towns are in the Austin area and they have a nice pine forest like the south. Bastrop is only 29 miles from Austin so you have the "southern landscape" nearby.

http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/mc...s/pines-sm.jpg

http://www.bastroptexas.net/around_b...statepark5.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2473/...b5a57293a9.jpg

http://pix.tx.travelingmorgans.com/T...040355-LRG.JPG

I don't know about you but the scenery in the lost pines is pretty good.
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Old 10-01-2009, 10:38 PM
 
Location: At the center of the universe!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
My neighbors have cactus in their yard, and I have a yucca. Neither is uncommon, especially as you go further south from Atlanta into South Fulton and Clayton Counties. Of course they are more common around Austin, but not uncommon in other states around the South, particularly in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal regions.

I do agree with you that NOVA is much more like the South that most people stereotypically imagine. All of Virginia has a funky accent...it sounds almost Canadian-like compared to Alabama. There are all kinds of different accents throughout the South, but they are still southern. NOVA is no exception.
Yes they definitely have southern accents in VA and some in N. VA. A lot of people from VA that I have heard have pretty big southern accents. Yes I agree there are different types of southern accents. Probably most people in central and east TX have southern accents but they sound different than people from TN, GA, AL, those states.
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Old 10-01-2009, 10:40 PM
 
Location: At the center of the universe!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
If NOVA is Southern, the residents of Fairfax County, Arlington, and Alexandria do not know it.
There are definitely southerners in N. VA but yeah I agree most people there probably don't consider themselves southern. Most people in Austin probably don't consider themselves southern either. Especially since a lot of Austinites came from CA, up north, etc.
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Old 10-02-2009, 06:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frodo2008 View Post
You're right. N. VA and Austin are both blue places and not so southern anymore. Yes Richmond was the headquarters of the Confederacy and 87% of Virginians identify themselves as southerners. That's a pretty overwhelming majority. N. VA still has southern qualities. It's a long way from NYC.
Just to note -- with all due respect -- this figure is not quite accurate...and may be confusing another question on the same survey.

The background is that a twice yearly poll was taken over a 7 year period by John Shelton Reed of the "Southern Studies" dept at the U. of N.C. The intent was to "find the South" by where a majority of the residents considered their community to be in the South, and also considered themselves Southerners. Here were the aggregate results of this Southern Focus Poll study:

************

Percent who say their community is in the South (percentage base in parentheses)

Alabama 98 (717) South Carolina 98 (553) Louisiana 97 (606) Mississippi 97 (431) Georgia 97 (1017) Tennessee 97 (838) North Carolina 93 (1292) Arkansas 92 (400) Florida 90 (1792) Texas 84 (2050) Virginia 82 (1014) Kentucky 79 (582) Oklahoma 69 (411)

West Virginia 45 (82) Maryland 40 (173) Missouri 23 (177) Delaware 14 (21) D.C. 7 (15)

Percent who say they are Southerners (percentage base in parentheses)

Mississippi 90 (432) Louisiana 89 (606) Alabama 88 (716) Tennessee 84 (838) South Carolina 82 (553) Arkansas 81 (399) Georgia 81 (1017) North Carolina 80 (1290) Texas 68 (2053) Kentucky 68 (584) Virginia 60 (1012) Oklahoma 53 (410) Florida 51 (1791)

West Virginia 25 (84) Maryland 19 (192) Missouri 15 (197) New Mexico 13 (68) Delaware 12 (25) D.C. 12 (16)

************

One can note the "gap" between the percentages of affirmative answers to the two questions in both Texas and Virginia (and even more noteable in Florida). Undoubtably, a large part of the reason for this is the number of non-Southern migrants to these states (as the poll did not ask respondents if they were natives of the area). That is, many transplants from other regions may acknowlege they live in the South, but not personally consider themselves to be Southerners.

Anyway, just something in the FWIW department. Carry on!
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Old 10-02-2009, 11:18 PM
 
Location: At the center of the universe!
1,176 posts, read 1,681,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Just to note -- with all due respect -- this figure is not quite accurate...and may be confusing another question on the same survey.

The background is that a twice yearly poll was taken over a 7 year period by John Shelton Reed of the "Southern Studies" dept at the U. of N.C. The intent was to "find the South" by where a majority of the residents considered their community to be in the South, and also considered themselves Southerners. Here were the aggregate results of this Southern Focus Poll study:

************

Percent who say their community is in the South (percentage base in parentheses)

Alabama 98 (717) South Carolina 98 (553) Louisiana 97 (606) Mississippi 97 (431) Georgia 97 (1017) Tennessee 97 (838) North Carolina 93 (1292) Arkansas 92 (400) Florida 90 (1792) Texas 84 (2050) Virginia 82 (1014) Kentucky 79 (582) Oklahoma 69 (411)

West Virginia 45 (82) Maryland 40 (173) Missouri 23 (177) Delaware 14 (21) D.C. 7 (15)

Percent who say they are Southerners (percentage base in parentheses)

Mississippi 90 (432) Louisiana 89 (606) Alabama 88 (716) Tennessee 84 (838) South Carolina 82 (553) Arkansas 81 (399) Georgia 81 (1017) North Carolina 80 (1290) Texas 68 (2053) Kentucky 68 (584) Virginia 60 (1012) Oklahoma 53 (410) Florida 51 (1791)

West Virginia 25 (84) Maryland 19 (192) Missouri 15 (197) New Mexico 13 (68) Delaware 12 (25) D.C. 12 (16)

************

One can note the "gap" between the percentages of affirmative answers to the two questions in both Texas and Virginia (and even more noteable in Florida). Undoubtably, a large part of the reason for this is the number of non-Southern migrants to these states (as the poll did not ask respondents if they were natives of the area). That is, many transplants from other regions may acknowlege they live in the South, but not personally consider themselves to be Southerners.

Anyway, just something in the FWIW department. Carry on!
I see what you're saying here but the first question has TX at 84% and VA at 82%. So the vast majority of the people in both states think their state is a southern state. So that definitely puts VA and TX in the south. This set of statistics shows VA at 82%. A while back I saw a statistic that put VA at 87% for this question. So it looks like Texans and Virginians realize their state is in the south.
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Old 10-03-2009, 12:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
My neighbors have cactus in their yard, and I have a yucca. Neither is uncommon, especially as you go further south from Atlanta into South Fulton and Clayton Counties. Of course they are more common around Austin, but not uncommon in other states around the South, particularly in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal regions.

I do agree with you that NOVA is much more like the South that most people stereotypically imagine. All of Virginia has a funky accent...it sounds almost Canadian-like compared to Alabama. There are all kinds of different accents throughout the South, but they are still southern. NOVA is no exception.
Wow. I didn't know that about cactus in ATL. You learn something new everyday. And yes I have heard the VA accents, they are very strange. They don't really pronounce there R's.
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Old 10-03-2009, 12:41 AM
 
13,997 posts, read 21,832,338 times
Reputation: 4065
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frodo2008 View Post
East of Austin is pretty green but yeah in the immediate Austin area you don't have a pine forest like you do in most of the south. You do have the Lost Pines though between Smithville and Bastrop. Those towns are in the Austin area and they have a nice pine forest like the south. Bastrop is only 29 miles from Austin so you have the "southern landscape" nearby.

http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/mc...s/pines-sm.jpg

http://www.bastroptexas.net/around_b...statepark5.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2473/...b5a57293a9.jpg

http://pix.tx.travelingmorgans.com/T...040355-LRG.JPG

I don't know about you but the scenery in the lost pines is pretty good.
I have indeed seen the lost pines in Bastrop. It's quite strange.
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