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Old 07-08-2009, 10:12 AM
 
44 posts, read 67,133 times
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Charlotte is NOT a major city. It's metro is not bigger than most mid-sized cities. The only reason it has a large city population is because it has much larger boundaries then other cities. It is a major SUBURB, but not a major city. It is nothing but America's largest independent suburb, well along with Phoenix.

Charlotte's core is laughable to most cities (even smaller mid-size cities). Even downtown feels like a suburb with skyscrapers.
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Old 07-08-2009, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Winter Park, FL
1,878 posts, read 2,642,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ihatemorons View Post
Charlotte's core is laughable to most cities (even smaller mid-size cities). Even downtown feels like a suburb with skyscrapers.
Laughable? A downtown that is more walkable than most, has dozens of restaurants and nightlife locales, and seems to be doing a good job of growing is laughable? Not everyone likes gentrified old buildings with 'character'. Personally, I like new buildings and new storefronts.
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Old 07-08-2009, 10:36 AM
 
536 posts, read 867,118 times
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Denver.
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Old 07-08-2009, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
548 posts, read 1,382,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ihatemorons View Post
Charlotte is NOT a major city. It's metro is not bigger than most mid-sized cities. The only reason it has a large city population is because it has much larger boundaries then other cities. It is a major SUBURB, but not a major city. It is nothing but America's largest independent suburb, well along with Phoenix.

Charlotte's core is laughable to most cities (even smaller mid-size cities). Even downtown feels like a suburb with skyscrapers.
I am hardly a Charlotte supporter (I'm a Northeast guy) but Charlotte is BUILDING itself into being a major city. There wasn't much infrastructure to build around so of course it's going to have a new, gentrified feel.

I prefer my cities old and established (NYC, Philly, Boston, Chicago) but jsut because "newer" cities don't have that historical infrastructre doesn't discount it or it's "major" status.
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Old 07-08-2009, 11:22 AM
 
44 posts, read 67,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maestro View Post
I am hardly a Charlotte supporter (I'm a Northeast guy) but Charlotte is BUILDING itself into being a major city. There wasn't much infrastructure to build around so of course it's going to have a new, gentrified feel.

I prefer my cities old and established (NYC, Philly, Boston, Chicago) but jsut because "newer" cities don't have that historical infrastructre doesn't discount it or it's "major" status.
I know. However, people on here are saying cities that have much larger metro populations, and more established urban areas are not Major cities, but Charlotte is.... Charlotte does not have a large metro population, and it has a very very small actual urban core. Most of it is a very large suburb. Cities like Cincinatti, Pittsburgh, St. louis, Kansas City, and others have larger or about equal metro populations, much larger and much more dense urban cores, and are not considered by most? These cities may have a smaller city population, but you city populations can't tell anything. They always vary among city areas. The cities mentioned all have more dense populations with smaller city areas.
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Old 07-08-2009, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,284 posts, read 3,974,641 times
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Definition of a City -

Per Merriam-Webster:

1 a: an inhabited place of greater size, population, or importance than a town or village

Per The Free Dictionary:

1. A center of population, commerce, and culture; a town of significant size and importance.

Per Answers.com

# A center of population, commerce, and culture; a town of significant size and importance.
#

1. An incorporated municipality in the United States with definite boundaries and legal powers set forth in a charter granted by the state.

Per Brainy Quote:

A corporate town; in the United States, a town or collective body of inhabitants, incorporated and governed by a mayor and aldermen or a city council consisting of a board of aldermen and a common council;
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Old 07-08-2009, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
7,812 posts, read 9,664,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
If Kansas City is to grow in the future in needs to get much more density in the Downtown, Plaza, and inner ring suburbs. The current model of "progress" and development in suburban KC is extremely unsustainable. I think KC is making progress over the past 8-10 years.
I agree with your premise there. However, many younger people leave KC because it just does not offer much at all for single people outside of a few small areas. The suburban culture is just much to encompassing.
I think the big growth players and economic drivers in the future will continue to be Denver, Omaha, Des Moines, Minneapolis, Sioux Falls, and Indianapolis.
Can you please stop trying to be an expert on KC, I don't think you really know much about the city and you are doing more harm than good in all your KC posts on this forum.

Although KC has a very large suburban population, the urban core is as vibrant and interesting and appealing to younger people as just about any city out there, especially in the midwest. You have to actually live there to know that though. KC is not a city that people "want" to move to. It's a not a city people even think about. It's sort of a secret really. But if you live there and gave the city a chance, it’s really an amazing urban and cosmopolitan city surrounded by many of the country’s nicest suburbs and lots of rural farmland.

With the River Market, P&L District, Quality Hill, Crossroads, Union Hill, Westport, Midtown, Plaza, Hyde Park and many more urban neighborhoods as well as a very strong arts scene, top theater, symphony, world class museums etc, the city is fine and as a single person, I don’t se why you would be any worse off in KC than most other large towns.

OK, having said that…

I don’t’ think KC will ever be a major boom town like Denver or Atlanta or Dallas. Mostly because the city is in a vaccum. Nobody knows about it and it has an image of rural, Kansas etc. Nobody strives to live in “Kansas”. Actually it’s the last place most people would want to live.

That “Kansas” rural stigma has and will continue to keep KC a national secret. People that live in the KC area (both MO and KS sides), know the city is a large metropolitan area of over two million with lots of things to do and see. It’s a city not in the middle of flat treeless oz, but a very hilly city built into forests, river valleys, and around lakes. Although the metro can spread out, the urban core of the city is quite dense and even though the metro takes up many square miles, 90% of the population live in a pretty small urbanized area similar to any other major metro area. The city will continue to grow at a good, modest clip. A healthy clip.

OK, back on topic. Sorry.

I’m not sure there are any new boom cities. Seems like the same ones to me and even Denver has really slowed down.

The big ones are still Vegas, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta and Phoenix. A few cities are entering into bigger league cities like Charlotte, Oklahoma City, Nashville etc, but I wouldn’t call them boom cities and some like Charlotte may not recover well from the recession.
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Old 07-08-2009, 01:36 PM
 
44 posts, read 67,133 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
Definition of a City -

Per Merriam-Webster:

1 a: an inhabited place of greater size, population, or importance than a town or village

Per The Free Dictionary:

1. A center of population, commerce, and culture; a town of significant size and importance.

Per Answers.com

# A center of population, commerce, and culture; a town of significant size and importance.
#

1. An incorporated municipality in the United States with definite boundaries and legal powers set forth in a charter granted by the state.

Per Brainy Quote:

A corporate town; in the United States, a town or collective body of inhabitants, incorporated and governed by a mayor and aldermen or a city council consisting of a board of aldermen and a common council;
Go look up the definition of "Urban", then come back and tell me how that relates to cities genius.
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Old 07-08-2009, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,284 posts, read 3,974,641 times
Reputation: 2016
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ihatemorons View Post
Go look up the definition of "Urban", then come back and tell me how that relates to cities genius.
I believe this thread was about cities NOT urban, but since you insist:

Merriam-Webster:

ur·ban Listen to the pronunciation of urban
Pronunciation:
\ˈər-bən\
Function:
adjective
Etymology:
Latin urbanus, from urbs city
Date:
1619

: of, relating to, characteristic of, or constituting a city
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Old 07-08-2009, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
548 posts, read 1,382,961 times
Reputation: 115
this was a good conversation until the Webster's dictionary talk showed up.
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