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View Poll Results: Which region do you belong to?
New England 11 6.96%
Foundry 50 31.65%
Dixie 27 17.09%
Breadbasket 16 10.13%
Islands 3 1.90%
Mexamerica 18 11.39%
Ecotopia 17 10.76%
Empty Quarter 4 2.53%
Quebec 0 0%
None/Other 12 7.59%
Voters: 158. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-15-2009, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Toronto
1,658 posts, read 3,204,143 times
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Quote:
Garreau argues that North America can be divided into nine regions, or "nations", which have distinctive economic and cultural differences. He argues that conventional national and state borders are largely artificial and irrelevant, and that his "nations" provide a more accurate way of understanding the true nature of North American society. Paul Meartz of Mayville State University called it "a classic text on the current regionalization of North America".
According to this man, so called state and international borders are completely irrelevant due to the vast cultural and economic (trade) features. Which one has been the most influential/successful according to you? And do you agree with his breakdown?

Do you think the same regional boundaries can apply today?



* New England — an expanded version including not only Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut (although omitting the Connecticut suburbs of New York City), but also the Canadian Atlantic provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Although some have later placed the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec in this extended "New England", Garreau did not. Capital: Boston.

* The Foundry — the by-then-declining industrial areas of the northeastern United States and Great Lakes region stretching from New York City to Milwaukee, and including Chicago and Philadelphia as well as industrial Southern Ontario centering on Toronto. Capital: Detroit.

* Dixie — the former Confederate States of America (today the southeastern United States) centered on Atlanta, and including most of eastern Texas. Garreau's "Dixie" also includes Kentucky (which had both Federal and Confederate governments); southern portions of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana; and the "Little Dixie" region of southeastern Oklahoma. Finally, the region also includes most of Florida, as far south as the cities of Fort Myers and Naples. Capital: Atlanta.

* The Breadbasket — most of the Great Plains states and part of the Prairie provinces: Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, the Dakotas, almost all of Oklahoma, most of western Missouri, western Wisconsin, eastern Colorado, the eastern edge of New Mexico, parts of Illinois and Indiana, and North Texas. Also included are some of Northern Ontario and southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Capital: Kansas City.

* The Islands — The South Florida metropolitan area, the Everglades and Florida Keys, the Caribbean, and parts of Venezuela. Garreau's original book also placed the area between Fort Myers and Naples in The Islands, but recent migration patterns have made it more distinct from the South Florida metropolitan area. Capital: Miami.

* Mexamerica — the southern and Central Valley portions of California as well as southern Arizona, the portion of Texas bordering on the Rio Grande, most of New Mexico and all of Mexico, centered on either Los Angeles or Mexico City (depending on whom you ask), which are significantly Spanish-speaking. Garreau's original book did not place all of Mexico within Mexamerica, but only Northern Mexico and the Baja California peninsula. Capital: Los Angeles.

* Ecotopia — the Pacific Northwest coast west of the Cascade Range, stretching from Alaska down through coastal British Columbia, Washington state, Oregon and into California just north of Santa Barbara. Capital: San Francisco.

* The Empty Quarter — most of Alaska, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana and Colorado from Denver west, as well as the eastern portions of Oregon, California, Washington, all of Alberta and Northern Canada (including what is now Nunavut), northern Arizona, parts of New Mexico (mainly the area controlled by the Navajo Nation), and British Columbia east of the Coast Ranges. Capital: Denver.

* Quebec — the primarily French-speaking province of Canada, which held referenda on secession in 1980 and 1995, the latter of which the "separatists" lost narrowly. Capital: Quebec City.

Exceptions


Garreau also discussed several areas that he termed "aberrations":
* Washington, D.C. and its surrounding area, specifically referring to the area "inside the Beltway".
* Manhattan south of Harlem (he placed Harlem, and by extension the Manhattan neighborhoods to its north, clearly within The Foundry).
* Hawaii, which he considered an Asian aberration as much as a North American aberration.
* Northern Alaska, despite its categorization on the front cover as part of the Empty Quarter, was listed in the aberrations section of book.

Last edited by ThroatGuzzler; 08-15-2009 at 11:47 PM..
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Old 08-15-2009, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Spain
1,856 posts, read 2,805,950 times
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How does he break it down...?
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Old 08-15-2009, 10:59 PM
 
1,108 posts, read 1,925,541 times
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I feel bad for people who live in Empty Quarter LOL.
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Old 08-15-2009, 11:07 PM
 
13,336 posts, read 13,365,256 times
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Islanders/Breadbasket/Dixie.
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Old 08-15-2009, 11:07 PM
 
786 posts, read 933,079 times
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I think a number of changes have happened since Garreau wrote his book in '81. For one, Denver seems more like Mexamerica nowadays, IMO.
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Old 08-15-2009, 11:19 PM
 
3,973 posts, read 7,274,752 times
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Yeah, "empty quarter" includes some of the fastest growing areas of the US, with the best economies, too. Salt Lake, Denver, Las Vegas, Idaho, etc. 1981 seems an eternity ago.
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Old 08-15-2009, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Toronto
1,658 posts, read 3,204,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
Yeah, "empty quarter" includes some of the fastest growing areas of the US, with the best economies, too. Salt Lake, Denver, Las Vegas, Idaho, etc. 1981 seems an eternity ago.
Do you think the other areas have maintained sort of the same persona, or is it just the empty quarter that has changed?
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Old 08-15-2009, 11:22 PM
 
13,336 posts, read 13,365,256 times
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^^^I agree, I think things have DRAMTICALLY changed since 81. Now days, I would include Islanders to go ALL the way up to Orlando and Tampa. From Orlando on down TODAY would EASILY be considered islanders. Both Orlando and Tampa are around 25-30% Hispanic. And BOTH cities have a HIGH Haitian population. And I agree about Denver. Now days it would be considered Meximerica.
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Old 08-15-2009, 11:24 PM
 
2,677 posts, read 5,697,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
Yeah, "empty quarter" includes some of the fastest growing areas of the US, with the best economies, too. Salt Lake, Denver, Las Vegas, Idaho, etc. 1981 seems an eternity ago.
Agreed. Mexamerica could include all of the Southwestern states. This is an interesting look at the regions of the continent as a whole, and not just the U.S. I do notice parts of Ontario near the Great Lakes can be culturally similar to the Midwestern U.S., and likewise Vancouver B.C. in the same category as Seattle and Portland.
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Old 08-15-2009, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
2,917 posts, read 5,229,671 times
Reputation: 1145
0 for Empty Quarter so far! What a surprise...
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