U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 08-21-2009, 12:06 AM
 
2,050 posts, read 3,924,553 times
Reputation: 815
OP, you have no idea what you're talking about. I've traveled a fair bit around the US and world.. and each city has it's own uniqueness and qualities to them.. but the cities you listed are NOT the only interesting cities. There were some cities that were absolutely boring.. ironically it's the city you are from. Don't even compare Cleveland and Milwaukee to Kansas City..

 
Old 08-21-2009, 01:37 AM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
13,856 posts, read 13,450,547 times
Reputation: 6448
I haven't traveled enough to know, but I think there would be more unique US cities than named. (Although I think small towns would be more where uniqueness lay and many here go by their own odd definitions of what counts as cities)

Just to guess

Anchorage, Alaska - Lots of gun owners and a relatively high percentage of American Indians. Canada might have cities like that, but probably not so far North.

Lafayette, Louisiana - As I recall it has a fairly strong Cajun culture and most of its residents are from Louisiana.

Provo, Utah - Mormon and highly conservative. Maybe you can find that in parts of the South Pacific, but it's pretty rare outside the US.
 
Old 08-21-2009, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Lansing Metro
2,729 posts, read 2,863,240 times
Reputation: 3428
Quote:
American cities not as unique as some claim....
One of the more ridiculous posts that I've seen.

I have never visited a city or town, big or small, that wasn't unique.

I mean, yeah, if you want to oversimplify... ALL cities are the same worldwide. A bunch of people living by each other, mixed in with commerce and industry. Buildings, trees, streets and people. Good Lord, I'm getting bored already. All cities are the same.

Could there maybe be something on Mars that I'd find interesting? Maybe. But I hear they are largely intolerant of other life forms and lack public transportation.
 
Old 08-21-2009, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
1,661 posts, read 2,561,321 times
Reputation: 987
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I haven't traveled enough to know, but I think there would be more unique US cities than named. (Although I think small towns would be more where uniqueness lay and many here go by their own odd definitions of what counts as cities)

Just to guess

Anchorage, Alaska - Lots of gun owners and a relatively high percentage of American Indians. Canada might have cities like that, but probably not so far North.

Lafayette, Louisiana - As I recall it has a fairly strong Cajun culture and most of its residents are from Louisiana.

Provo, Utah - Mormon and highly conservative. Maybe you can find that in parts of the South Pacific, but it's pretty rare outside the US.
I live in Lafayette, and hesitated to put it forth as truly unique because of New Orleans, but this town really does things quite differently. Architecturally its nothing to look at, but the huge amount of Cajun culture sort of makes it seem very special in that this is a growing city that retains its smaller town feel and really seems to fight big change. There are very few high rises, and yet downtown is bustling with club/cuisine activity without really looking much like a downtown. Instead of a bunch of suburbs, Lafayette kind of grew southward into a mixed community and somehow it also tries to go more upscale with projects like River Ranch, and a citywide fiber optic network. Its almost like the Cajuns are trying to make a modern city, but stubbornly stick to their rural roots and so the city is a weird hybrid of traditional ideas and high technology, while still retaining odd rurality even in the heart of the city (horse farms and open tracts around town and such). Its also kind of odd how its built away from the interstates in terms of residential and retail zones, and yet the most busy streets have direct access to the interstate and several exits. Its almost as though you could drive I10 by the city, and completely miss the fact that theres a hub city right there with 120k people in it.
 
Old 08-21-2009, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Mequon
6,810 posts, read 11,805,934 times
Reputation: 2958
As much as I love the south and it's weather, it's all very much the same feel.
 
Old 08-21-2009, 08:43 AM
 
9,044 posts, read 13,208,750 times
Reputation: 7093
I think there are a select few unique cities, or the word I was thinking was niche.

New York
Miami
New Orleans
Las Vegas
San Francisco
 
Old 08-21-2009, 08:45 AM
 
13,318 posts, read 13,017,603 times
Reputation: 3415
Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
Honestly your list is too long

There are only two "truly unique" American cities:

New York City
New Orleans


I know people will start chiming in with stuff about urbanity, density, diversity, history and other things, but I've been all around the world on every continent and there are no other cities in this country or else where even close to them. You may find places similar in size and cultural scope, but it's mainly superficial.

Now before everyone gets upset, keep in mind that not being "truly unique" does not equal not being important. If you take all the other major economic and cultural cities in America you can very easily match them to other places in this country. For example:

Philly and Boston for their role in the revolution and the industrialization of America.

The sunbelt cities of Los Angeles, Dallas, Houston and Atlanta

The port cities of Baltimore, Charleston, and Savannah (think historical here people before you start a wee-wee contest about populations)

The western costal cities of San Francisco and Seattle

The midwestern cities of Chicago, Detroit and St. Louis

The rustbelt cities.

They all developed along similar patterns and purposes at about the same time even if some were more successful than their counterparts.

Now try doing the same matching game with New Orleans and New York City and watch the epic fail.
NYC and Chicago match EASILY. Same demographics(Italians and Puerto Ricans) Pizza, the mob, alot of tall brick public housing, skyscrapers, northern, both are BIG cities in rather RURAL states. NYC and Chicago are EERILY similar to me. Almost everything I said for CHI and NYC, could also apply to Philly.
 
Old 08-21-2009, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
505 posts, read 825,459 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
Like I said, there are only two "truly unique" cities in America. Of course every city in America is unique. Heck, even the Twin Cities are unique. You entirely missed the point though. As different as Chicago and Detroit may seem, they were both started to exploit the Great Lakes and Prairie. Both San Francisco and Seattle started off as port towns and experienced booms from Gold Rushes. In each case however both city pairings took off in their own direction at some point.

And again, not being "truly unique" does not equal not being unique or important.
OK. We could also say something similar for the two cities you listed as unique: New York City and New Orleans.

-As different as New York City may seem from Boston, Charleston, and Savannah, they were all started as colonial cities in order to exploit the natural resources of America and ship goods across the Atlantic
-As different as New Orleans may seem from St. Louis, both were settled by the French as colonial cities along the Mississippi River before being transferred to the United States

And in both of those cases, the city pairings took off in their own direction at some point.

The same thing you have done with San Francisco and Chicago can also be done with New York City and New Orleans.

Last edited by dem3456; 08-21-2009 at 08:55 AM..
 
Old 08-21-2009, 08:50 AM
 
13,318 posts, read 13,017,603 times
Reputation: 3415
Unique
Miami.
Since according to people on C-D, Miami is a 3rd world city, and there aren't many third world cities in the US. So Miami.
And New Orleans is unique also.
 
Old 08-21-2009, 08:51 AM
 
13,318 posts, read 13,017,603 times
Reputation: 3415
Is it me, or is NYC and Chicago VERY similar characteristically?
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top