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Old 01-14-2018, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
I like cities with one major university because then the college becomes the city's trademark. By going to the college, you become part of the college community and the city community. Cities with one major university are the classic college towns.

But in cities like Boston that have multiple colleges, you're just a student at one of many colleges in the city. The multiple colleges each have their own community and are more isolated.
Yes.
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Old 01-14-2018, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
undergrad in college town, then do your grad school in a big city where u plan to work...
I took that approach and I'm glad that I did. I got the isolated "college town" atmosphere for four years of college, and then went to grad school in the NYC area where I could land internships that I could maintain throughout the year. I think being here, the program/I benefitted from a large pool of local alumni, guest speakers and presenters, etc., as well. Grad school was much more "about business" than enjoying another couple of years of "college."
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Old 01-15-2018, 01:21 AM
 
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Nashville's profile (there are a number of small colleges/universities not listed):

In the city:
Vanderbilt University - 12,592 (6,885/5,707)
Tennessee State University 9,027 (7,073/1,954)
Belmont University - 8,080 (6,569/1,511)
Lipscomb University - 4,632 (2,986/1,646)
Trevecca Nazarene University - 3,221 (2,092/1,129)
Meharry Medical College - 831
Fisk University - 800

In the metro:
Middle Tennessee State University - 22,050 (19,693/2,357)

Community colleges:
Nashville State Technical Community College - 9,853
Volunteer State Community College - 8,193
Columbia State Community College - 5,297

Notes:
Vanderbilt and Belmont are adjacent to each other, which effectively forms a college district with more than 20,000 total students. Vanderbilt has been fairly stagnant, but Belmont has hit a major growth spurt. That area of town (Midtown/Hillsboro Village/12 South) probably has the most overall college vibe in the city.

Tennessee State, Fisk, and Meharry are all HBCUs. Fisk and Meharry are adjacent to one another. TSU is right down the street. It is another sort of college cluster (all along Jefferson St).

MTSU is 30 miles down the road, but is the defacto large state university in the region. While it is obviously not the premier state university, it has gained a lot of prominence in the last 20-30 years.

The Nashville metro is home to 5 Division 1 sports programs (Vanderbilt, Belmont, TSU, Lipscomb, MTSU). Vanderbilt (SEC) and MTSU (C-USA) compete in the FBS, while TSU (OVC) competes in the FCS. Belmont competes in basketball (OVC) while Lipscomb is in the Atlantic Sun.

Vanderbilt is definitely the school of note, but Nashville does have a pretty good variety of colleges and universities.
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Old 10-28-2018, 10:55 AM
 
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I would say the big power college cities are going to be New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington DC, and Boston. Most major cities have a number of colleges and universities, even if they are small. But across the Northeast and Midwest there are smaller midsize cities that actually have large universities over some man or cities. Like for example Ann Arbor, Michigan has over 65, 000 college students, with two two major universities in the area ( Univ of Michigan, and Eastern Michigan university ). Now compare Ann Arbor against man or cities like Jacksonville or Memphis. Those cities dontbeven have 30,000 college students in their metropolitan areas.
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Old 10-28-2018, 11:02 AM
 
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In the Southeast three cities standout as major cities with good number of colleges/ universities. Atlanta, Nashville, and Raleigh-Durham. Notice these three cities has all been the most desirable in the Southeast for Amazon to open their 2nd headquarters. All three have ample college educated students.
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Old 10-28-2018, 11:52 AM
 
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On the surface, Seattle feels like a "one big university" city. The UW dominates.

But we do have some under-the-radar universities in Seattle U and Seattle Pacific U within city limits. Seattle U is actually a decent size, and both are good for academics. What we lack is a good private university that's not religion-based.

Outside of city limits it's pretty sparse too. The UW has growing branch campuses is Bothell and Downtown Tacoma which are filling much of this gap. Tacoma also has the University of Puget Sound and Pacific Lutheran University, both fairly small. Bellevue College recently elevated to four-year from its CC past.

Community colleges are much bigger here than usual. One reason is that many F/S students go there for two years then transfer to the universities. This means your basic classes are 25 people vs. 150 people, and it also saves a ton of money, both in tuition and since many people can stay with their parents since CCs can be close to home. Also these have a lot of technical programs, whether you're going to assemble airplane parts or be a nurse.

The big university in our case also pulls in one of the largest research grant totals in the country. Whether you do that with big public universities or elite private ones, that's an essential ingredient to being a center of some industries, biotech for example.
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamalc View Post
I would say the big power college cities are going to be New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington DC, and Boston. Most major cities have a number of colleges and universities, even if they are small. But across the Northeast and Midwest there are smaller midsize cities that actually have large universities over some man or cities. Like for example Ann Arbor, Michigan has over 65, 000 college students, with two two major universities in the area ( Univ of Michigan, and Eastern Michigan university ). Now compare Ann Arbor against man or cities like Jacksonville or Memphis. Those cities dontbeven have 30,000 college students in their metropolitan areas.
Doesn’t San Francisco belong with the cities you mentioned. The Bay Area’s two powerhouses, Stanford and Cal, cement’ SF’s status of a university super star.
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Old 10-28-2018, 09:01 PM
 
108 posts, read 38,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
Doesn’t San Francisco belong with the cities you mentioned. The Bay Area’s two powerhouses, Stanford and Cal, cement’ SF’s status of a university super star.
I agree 100% with you. You also cannot forget UCSF which has one of the best medical schools in the US.
Another interresting thing will be if Athens is eventually added to the ATL MSA. I think it is unlikely, but if it did happen Atlanta could definitely make a claim for being in the elite.
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Old 10-29-2018, 08:21 AM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
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Austin has
University of Texas,
Huston-Tillotson University
St. Edwards University
Concordia
Austin Community College.

In Austin metro there's,
Texas State University in San Marcos (with a branch in Round Rock)
Southwestern University in Georgetown

There are close to 200,000 college students in Austin metro.
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Old 10-29-2018, 11:55 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamalc View Post
I would say the big power college cities are going to be New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington DC, and Boston. Most major cities have a number of colleges and universities, even if they are small. But across the Northeast and Midwest there are smaller midsize cities that actually have large universities over some man or cities. Like for example Ann Arbor, Michigan has over 65, 000 college students, with two two major universities in the area ( Univ of Michigan, and Eastern Michigan university ). Now compare Ann Arbor against man or cities like Jacksonville or Memphis. Those cities dontbeven have 30,000 college students in their metropolitan areas.
Eastern Michigan University is in Ypsilanti. Believe me, people from Ann Arbor do not consider the two the same city, nor should they. They also donít like to be considered part of Metro Detroit, which for all intents and purposes they are. The Detroit CSA has the two you mentioned along with U of M Dearborn, a private Jesuit school in the University of Detroit Mercy, and two more state schools with Wayne State University and Oakland University. While not on the level of some of the power cities for higher education, it shouldnít be overlooked either. I am a bit biased though.

As others have mentioned San Francisco should be with your cities listed, as should Atlanta. Technically theyíre both ahead of Washington D.C.. Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, San Diego, and Seattle are up there too, but not quite on the same level.

This link has the cities with the most top 200 University in the world. Boston, LA, NYC, San Francisco, Chicago, and Atlanta are amongst the top 20 cities in the world.

https://www.timeshighereducation.com...versity-cities

Personally speaking itís best to go to school, whether itís big or small, public or private, near a major city. Not to say going to school in the middle of nowhere is a bad idea, but the access to internships, and quality jobs while in school will put you well ahead in the game come graduation time.
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