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Old 09-02-2009, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,241,149 times
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What are the advantages of each?

Say, for ex., a place like Columbus, that has a powerhouse in OSU

vs a place like Kansas City, that doesnt have one big college, but a number of smaller good schools.


obvious advantage I see is the powerhouse school will have the name recognition.

IF you can get it.

The smaller schools might offer easier access, but less interesting lectures (if any)


any other advantages/disadvantages?
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 29,784,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
What are the advantages of each?

Say, for ex., a place like Columbus, that has a powerhouse in OSU

vs a place like Kansas City, that doesnt have one big college, but a number of smaller good schools.


obvious advantage I see is the powerhouse school will have the name recognition.

IF you can get it.

The smaller schools might offer easier access, but less interesting lectures (if any)


any other advantages/disadvantages?
Having multiple smaller ones give you more options and varieties to choose from. Having one huge one creates great publicity and attracts more out of state and country students.

You do have cities with one major universities and lots of smaller ones such as Atlanta, NYC, LA, etc
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:35 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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big state universities aren't always known for their academics...I'd much rather go to a smaller school with a better academic reputation.

^nyc and la have lots of big ones and small ones and medium size ones...atlanta is not even close to matching, if u were using that as example.

I mean what kind of name recognition do you want? That they have a nice football program and you see a lot of t-shirts? Most competent HR people know the difference in Amherst vs. University of Nebraska for example, as do graduate advisors...

The smaller schools, usually private are actually harder access, smaller class sizes and better lectures, not the other way around where you have 1st year grad students teaching the course, you might not even come into contact with a professor until your junior year. which is how it works at a lot of the big state research schools, that happen to have big name recognition, but not necesarily the same quality of education.

So really, size doesn't matter, it is the quality of the institution, even down to the junior college level in some cases. For instance Santa Rosa Junior College has professors who used to lecture at Stanford, Berkeley etc. but prefer being in a different location. It was actually modeled after Berkeley and a big feeder school and has 40K students.

Last edited by grapico; 09-02-2009 at 12:46 PM..
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 29,784,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
big state universities aren't always known for their academics...I'd much rather go to a smaller school with a better academic reputation.

^nyc and la have lots of big ones and small ones and medium size ones...atlanta is not even close to matching, if u were using that as example.

I mean what kind of name recognition do you want? That they have a nice football program and you see a lot of t-shirts? Most competent HR people know the difference in Amherst vs. University of Nebraska for example, as do graduate advisors...

The smaller schools, usually private are actually harder access, smaller class sizes and better lectures, not the other way around where you have 1st year grad students teaching the course, which is how it works at a lot of the big state research schools, that happen to have big name recognition, but not necesarily the same quality of education.
ATL: Georgia Tech, Georgia State, Spelman, Morehouse, Clark, Emory, etc

The first two and Emory would probably be considered major depending on how you look at it.
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,241,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Having multiple smaller ones give you more options and varieties to choose from. Having one huge one creates great publicity and attracts more out of state and country students.

You do have cities with one major universities and lots of smaller ones such as Atlanta, NYC, LA, etc
true. but usually they are much bigger areas...

and would answers change if your talking bout graduate level?
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:50 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 23,766,008 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
ATL: Georgia Tech, Georgia State, Spelman, Morehouse, Clark, Emory, etc

The first two and Emory would probably be considered major depending on how you look at it.
don't do this man... I know what ATL has. Just don't compare ATL institutions with what is in NYC/LA it is going to get clobbered. I just thought it was rather odd you said NYC/LA then ATL.
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 29,784,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
true. but usually they are much bigger areas...
Correct. If cities like Austin didn't have UT or Boulder didn't have UCB. They probably wouldn't be as known today.
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Seattle & Bellevue
253 posts, read 826,398 times
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ATL in the same .edu league as NY? LA? What?
This is a joke...
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Old 09-02-2009, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Haddonfield New Jersey
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I think cities with a variety of colleges to choose from are best. Being in New Jersey gave me the option of choosing between schools in college cities and towns in New Jersey, Philadelphia, and New York City.
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Old 09-02-2009, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 29,784,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
don't do this man... I know what ATL has. Just don't compare ATL institutions with what is in NYC/LA it is going to get clobbered. I just thought it was rather odd you said NYC/LA then ATL.
I wasn't aware we were comparing schools. To my understanding I was just listing major and smaller schools.
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